3Ca(Po3)2+10C 
Author Message
 3Ca(Po3)2+10C
3Ca(Po3)2+10C
I would like to know the correct name of this Calcium Phosphate, and what is
the 2+10C at the end?
Your help would be greatly appreciated.


Sun, 25 Dec 2005 07:26:36 GMT
 3Ca(Po3)2+10C
Dear Attila Veres:


Quote:
> 3Ca(Po3)2+10C
> I would like to know the correct name of this Calcium Phosphate, and what
is
> the 2+10C at the end?
> Your help would be greatly appreciated.

Po is Polonium
URL:http://www.webelements.com/webelements/elements/text/Po/key.html

3Ca(PO3)2 is the fomula for calcium phospate.  The final "2" indicates the
number of phosphate "groupings" (the PO3) attached to the calcium.

I suspect the 10C, depending on context, is ten atoms of carbon.

David A. Smith



Sun, 25 Dec 2005 07:45:33 GMT
 3Ca(Po3)2+10C


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 3Ca(Po3)2+10C


Quote:
> Dear Attila Veres:



> > 3Ca(Po3)2+10C
> > I would like to know the correct name of this Calcium Phosphate, and
what
> is
> > the 2+10C at the end?
> > Your help would be greatly appreciated.

> Po is Polonium
> URL:http://www.webelements.com/webelements/elements/text/Po/key.html

> 3Ca(PO3)2 is the fomula for calcium phospate.  The final "2" indicates the
> number of phosphate "groupings" (the PO3) attached to the calcium.

> I suspect the 10C, depending on context, is ten atoms of carbon.

> David A. Smith

Thank you David,
It should be phosphate. PO
In the J.T. Baker catalogue I found only
Monobasic: Ca(H2PO4)2.H2O
Diabasic: CaHPO4
Tribasic: Ca5(OH)(PO4)3
but I couldn't find 3Ca(PO3)2+10C

I did Internet search and I got here,
http://www.thirdclassroom.net/htmlib/400941027994287.html
 cannot read it, could be Chinese, and found this:
Ca3(PO4)2+2H2SO4 == Ca(H2PO4)2+2CaSO4
Ca(H2PO4)2 == Ca(PO3)2+2H2O
3Ca(PO3)2+10C == Ca3(PO4)2+4P+10CO
still not much help to me.

Attila



Sun, 25 Dec 2005 09:23:28 GMT
 3Ca(Po3)2+10C


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 3Ca(Po3)2+10C

Quote:

>3Ca(Po3)2+10C
>I would like to know the correct name of this Calcium Phosphate, and what is
>the 2+10C at the end?
>Your help would be greatly appreciated.

What is the context?

As written, the formula above is nonsensical.

Calcium phosphate is Ca3(PO4)2.  There are other entities which may be
called "calcium phosphate" which contain varying amounts of hydrogen
ion, e.g. CaHPO4.  There is also a calcium phosphite, CaHPO3, but it
is much less common.

The "10C" means nothing as written.  Either this is some sort of a
misprint, or it's taken from an equation.  Are you trying to make
phosphorus?

Steve Turner

Real address contains worldnet instead of spamnet



Sun, 25 Dec 2005 09:26:35 GMT
 3Ca(Po3)2+10C

Quote:

>>3Ca(Po3)2+10C
>>I would like to know the correct name of this Calcium Phosphate, and what is
>>the 2+10C at the end?
>>Your help would be greatly appreciated.

>What is the context?

>As written, the formula above is nonsensical.

>Calcium phosphate is Ca3(PO4)2.  There are other entities which may be
>called "calcium phosphate" which contain varying amounts of hydrogen
>ion, e.g. CaHPO4.  There is also a calcium phosphite, CaHPO3, but it
>is much less common.

>The "10C" means nothing as written.  Either this is some sort of a
>misprint, or it's taken from an equation.  Are you trying to make
>phosphorus?

Agreed  ... but could it be some kind of ore as written ?  (with bits of the
formula missing)

Bruce

--------------------------------------------------------------------
Oook !
NOTE remove the not_ from the address to reply. NO SPAM !



Sun, 25 Dec 2005 10:47:47 GMT
 3Ca(Po3)2+10C


Quote:
> Dear Attila Veres:



> > 3Ca(Po3)2+10C
> > I would like to know the correct name of this Calcium Phosphate, and
what
> is
> > the 2+10C at the end?
> > Your help would be greatly appreciated.

> Po is Polonium
> URL:http://www.webelements.com/webelements/elements/text/Po/key.html

> 3Ca(PO3)2 is the fomula for calcium phospate.  The final "2" indicates the
> number of phosphate "groupings" (the PO3) attached to the calcium.

> I suspect the 10C, depending on context, is ten atoms of carbon.

PO3 is phosphite, not phosphate.  Not sure if that's a typo, but it's not
clear what the OP is trying to communicate with that formula--I can't tell
what's supposed to be subscripted, what might be superscripted, and which
numbers are on the line.  If we had that info, and were sure there are no
typos, it would be infinitely easier to parse the formula.

    Eric Lucas



Sun, 25 Dec 2005 13:28:41 GMT
 3Ca(Po3)2+10C
Dear Eric Lucas:


Quote:



> > Dear Attila Veres:



> > > 3Ca(Po3)2+10C
> > > I would like to know the correct name of this Calcium Phosphate, and
> what
> > is
> > > the 2+10C at the end?
> > > Your help would be greatly appreciated.

> > Po is Polonium
> > URL:http://www.webelements.com/webelements/elements/text/Po/key.html

> > 3Ca(PO3)2 is the fomula for calcium phospate.  The final "2" indicates
the
> > number of phosphate "groupings" (the PO3) attached to the calcium.

> > I suspect the 10C, depending on context, is ten atoms of carbon.

> PO3 is phosphite, not phosphate.  Not sure if that's a typo, but it's not
> clear what the OP is trying to communicate with that formula--I can't
tell
> what's supposed to be subscripted, what might be superscripted, and which
> numbers are on the line.  If we had that info, and were sure there are no
> typos, it would be infinitely easier to parse the formula.

Yes, I made a hasty conclusion.  You are correct about phosphite, in case I
had confused anyone other than myself.

The OP had responded, and somehow usenet had resequenced it, with a
"complete" set of three formulae.  So you don't have to find his post, I
will quote the relevant portion here:

<QUOTE>
I did Internet search and I got here,
http://www.thirdclassroom.net/htmlib/400941027994287.html
 cannot read it, could be Chinese, and found this:
Ca3(PO4)2+2H2SO4 == Ca(H2PO4)2+2CaSO4
Ca(H2PO4)2 == Ca(PO3)2+2H2O
3Ca(PO3)2+10C == Ca3(PO4)2+4P+10CO
still not much help to me.
<END QUOTE>

David A. Smith



Sun, 25 Dec 2005 21:24:10 GMT
 3Ca(Po3)2+10C

Quote:



>>>3Ca(Po3)2+10C
>>The "10C" means nothing as written.  Either this is some sort of a
>>misprint, or it's taken from an equation.  Are you trying to make
>>phosphorus?

>Agreed  ... but could it be some kind of ore as written ?  (with bits of the
>formula missing)

Calcium phosphite in graphite or something?  Possible, I suppose; I'm
not a minerologist.  But the formula:

3Ca(PO3)2

is still problematic.  At the very least, calcium phosphite should be
written Ca3(PO3)2, and I'm not even sure if this form of calcium
phosphite exists.

Again, it would be helpful to know the context of the original.

Steve Turner

Real address contains worldnet instead of spamnet



Mon, 26 Dec 2005 07:28:53 GMT
 3Ca(Po3)2+10C


Quote:
> The OP had responded, and somehow usenet had resequenced it, with a
> "complete" set of three formulae.  So you don't have to find his post, I
> will quote the relevant portion here:

> <QUOTE>
> I did Internet search and I got here,
> http://www.thirdclassroom.net/htmlib/400941027994287.html
>  cannot read it, could be Chinese, and found this:
> Ca3(PO4)2+2H2SO4 == Ca(H2PO4)2+2CaSO4
> Ca(H2PO4)2 == Ca(PO3)2+2H2O
> 3Ca(PO3)2+10C == Ca3(PO4)2+4P+10CO
> still not much help to me.
> <END QUOTE>

Ah, all is now clear.  I jumped to a wrong conclusion, PO3 is *not* a
phosphite (i.e., P(+3)), but rather PO3(-1), some sort of pyrophosphate,
still formally P(+5).  I call it a pyrophosphate because the second reaction
almost certainly involves heat to drive off water.  To the OP, the last line
says that 3 molecules of this calcium pyrophosphate reacts with 10 carbon
atoms to give calcium phosphate, 10 molecules of carbon monoxide and 4 atoms
of some allotrope of elemental phosphorus.

    Eric Lucas



Mon, 26 Dec 2005 08:47:36 GMT
 3Ca(Po3)2+10C

Quote:

>Ah, all is now clear.  I jumped to a wrong conclusion, PO3 is *not* a
>phosphite (i.e., P(+3)), but rather PO3(-1), some sort of pyrophosphate,
>still formally P(+5).

I'll be durned.  I've never heard of such a beast, but the Lewis
structure is actually pretty trivial to draw.  (Whether or not it's
real is another issue.)  Does this really exist as such (i.e., singly
charged monomer)?  Pyrophosphates are usually dimeric or trimeric,
IIRC.

Steve Turner

Real address contains worldnet instead of spamnet



Mon, 26 Dec 2005 11:31:30 GMT
 3Ca(Po3)2+10C


Quote:

> >Ah, all is now clear.  I jumped to a wrong conclusion, PO3 is *not* a
> >phosphite (i.e., P(+3)), but rather PO3(-1), some sort of pyrophosphate,
> >still formally P(+5).

> I'll be durned.  I've never heard of such a beast, but the Lewis
> structure is actually pretty trivial to draw.  (Whether or not it's
> real is another issue.)  Does this really exist as such (i.e., singly
> charged monomer)?  Pyrophosphates are usually dimeric or trimeric,
> IIRC.

I agree, I've never seen such a beast personally.  Ca(PO3)2 may just be a
fictional simplification for didactic purposes.  Maybe in reality some
partially hydrated dimeric anion like CaH2P2O7, or something like that.  On
the other hand, it may be real, with the unstable PO3- anion stabilized by
the Ca ions and lattice energy.  My copies of Cotton & Wilkinson and
Greenwood & Earnshaw are at work at the moment.

    Eric Lucas



Mon, 26 Dec 2005 11:59:49 GMT
 3Ca(Po3)2+10C

Quote:
> > Ca3(PO4)2+2H2SO4 == Ca(H2PO4)2+2CaSO4
> > Ca(H2PO4)2 == Ca(PO3)2+2H2O
> > 3Ca(PO3)2+10C == Ca3(PO4)2+4P+10CO
> > still not much help to me.

> Ah, all is now clear.  I jumped to a wrong conclusion, PO3 is *not* a
> phosphite (i.e., P(+3)), but rather PO3(-1), some sort of pyrophosphate,
> still formally P(+5).  I call it a pyrophosphate because the second reaction
> almost certainly involves heat to drive off water.  To the OP, the last line
> says that 3 molecules of this calcium pyrophosphate reacts with 10 carbon
> atoms to give calcium phosphate, 10 molecules of carbon monoxide and 4 atoms
> of some allotrope of elemental phosphorus.

This sounds a lot like a historical recreation of the synthesis of
phosphorus.  Concentrated horse urine was used as the phosphate source
and I think, charcoal the carbon.

Paddy



Wed, 28 Dec 2005 08:27:02 GMT
 3Ca(Po3)2+10C

Quote:

>> > Ca3(PO4)2+2H2SO4 == Ca(H2PO4)2+2CaSO4
>> > Ca(H2PO4)2 == Ca(PO3)2+2H2O
>> > 3Ca(PO3)2+10C == Ca3(PO4)2+4P+10CO
>This sounds a lot like a historical recreation of the synthesis of
>phosphorus.  Concentrated horse urine was used as the phosphate source
>and I think, charcoal the carbon.

*Horse* urine??!!!  Doubtless you refer to Brandt's original prep?  I
had always assumed that he used his own.

As a youngster (and ignorantster) I once tried making phosphorus by a
fanciful perversion of the Brandt method: boiling pee in a coffee can.
I would discourage anyone from repeating the experience.  It smells
really horrid, especially after the water is gone and the residue
begins to char.

Steve Turner

Real address contains worldnet instead of spamnet



Wed, 28 Dec 2005 10:50:22 GMT
 
 [ 17 post ]  Go to page: [1] [2]

 Relevant Pages 

1. 3Ca(PO3)2+10C story

2. Q: PO3-bond free energies in NAD+

3. The doctor is here ! (advice 10c)

4. Nermag R10-10C


 
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software