Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report #16 (6/13/97) 
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 Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report #16 (6/13/97)

[Downloaded from ftp.hq.nasa.gov]

Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report
Mission Control Center, Korolev, Russia
Monday, June 30, 1997, 10:00 a.m.. EDT

The Russian Space Station Mir continues to orbit the Earth in stable condition,
with Mir 23 cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev, Flight Engineer Alexander
Lazutkin and U.S. astronaut Mike Foale, reporting that they are all in good
condition.  Ten of the 11 operational Mir gyrodynes are now spun up and
providing automatic attitude control for thte station.  The Mir requires eight
to nine of these gyrodynes to be operational in order to control the orientation
of the station.  With the gyrodynes spun up, the crew will not have to use the
Mir thruster jets to maintain a stable orientation in orbit.  Spektr was damaged
last Wednesday when a Progress resupply ship collided with one of Spektr's solar
panels.

The Progress capsule carrying the needed repair equipment to Mir is tentatively
scheduled for launch July 5, with a July 7 Mir docking.  The crew is scheduled
to practive the internal spacewalk July 9, in preparation for a spacewalk
possibly as early as July 11.  This week, also in preparation for the spacewalk,
the crew will begin closing off the other Mir modules.  On July 4, the power
cables to the Priroda and Kristall modules will be disconnected and the Priroda
hatch will be closed.  The Kristall hatch will be closed July 10, along with the
hatch to the Kvant-2 module. On July 11, the day of the spacewalk, the remaining
module, the Core, will be disconnected and closed, leaving the Mir node section
isolated from the rest of Mir.

According to Russian space officials, the crew will have enough supplies to do
three spacewalks, if required. During the currently planned spacewalk, the two
cosmonauts will reattach more than 20 cables from the Spektr module, including
power cables from the three functioning solar arrays.  This will be done via a
specially-equipped palte that will be attached to a replacement Spektr hatch
which is already aboard Mir.  The internal spacewalk will take place the night
of July 11 through the morning of July 12, Moscow time, to ensure that the Mir
to ensure that the Mir will be over Russian ground stations during the activity.
The Russian specialists have already started to write the procedures for the
internal spacewalk, which, when complete, will be sent to the Mir crew.  Russian
technical experts have been working with NASA specialists to refine all the
procedures for the repair effort.

Over the weekend, the new Progress resupply ship was removed from its launch pad
at the Baikonur Cosmodrome and moved to the Assembly Integration Building at the
Kazakstan launch site to be reloaded.  To make room for the necessary repair
equipment, 140 kilograms of material (approximately 308 pounds) was removed from
the Progress.  Monday afternoon, the repair supplies, including several pieces
of U.S. spacewalk equipment and all the personal items Foale requested, were
flown to Baikonur.  The U.S.-supplied equipment weighs slightly more than 20 kg
(approximately 44 pounds).  The Progress will also bring a transmitter for the
Antares satellite communications system aboard Mir.  This new transmitter will
will allow the cosmonauts to expand their comunications with the Russian Mission
Control Center.

Environmental conditions aboard the station are all within normal range.  The
Vozdukh carbon dioxide scrubbing system is on, and today the crew activated the
new Elektron oxygen-generating unit in Kvant-1 brought to Mir by Atlantis in
during the last Shuttle docking mission in May).  The crew will continue to use
oxygen-producing candles, however, to augment oxygen levels.  The Mir batteries
are also fullly charged, which enabled the crew to turn on the urine processing
system this weekend.  The main cooling loop, which provides cooling for various
Core module systems, is also operational, as is the Mir's air conditioning unit.

Russian space officials and NASA technical specialists met again today to
discuss their plans for the recovery of power from the three undamaged Spektr
solar arrays.  Meanwhile, Russian controllers continue their tests of the
Progress vehicle wich collided with the Mir.  The Progress will be commanded to
deorbit later this week after all of the tests have been completed.  As it falls
back to Earth, the Progress capsule will burn up in the atmosphere.  More than a
More than a dozen Russian working groups are now investigating the Progress/Mir
collision incident with the assistance of NASA technical specialists.  U.S.
astronaut John Blaha, who served aboard Mir from Sept. 18, 1996 to Jan. 19,
1997, arrived in Russia today to begin working on the Progress collision
investigation team.  Blaha was joined by astronaut Leroy Chiao, who will work
with the Russian spacewalkig team.  Chiao has conducted two spacewalks on a
preevious Shuttle mission, and has also trained in the hydrolab facility at the
Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, outside Moscow in a Russian
spacesuit to simulate Mir spacewalks.

In science activities, Foale restarted the greenhouse experiment in the Priroda
module, offering the plants needed light and water. Foale will harvest the
mature plants and seeds later this week.  Foale will also move several pieces of
U.S. science equipment from the Priroda module into other modules so he can
continue his science research when not assisting the crew in spacewalk
preparation.



Fri, 17 Dec 1999 03:00:00 GMT
 Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report #16 (6/13/97)


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report #16 (6/13/97)

[Downloaded from NASA Spacelink]

Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report
Mission Control Center, Korolev, Russia
Tuesday, July 1, 1997,  10:30 a.m. EDT

The Russian Space Station Mir continues to orbit the Earth in stable
condition, with Mir 23 cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev, Flight
Engineer Alexander Lazutkin and U.S. astronaut Mike Foale reporting that
they are all in good condition. Today the crew continued their
preparations for a planned internal spacewalk to connect power cables
from the solar arrays on the damaged Spektr module to the batteries in
Mir's Core Module. The Spektr was hit by a Progress resupply ship last
Wednesday during a redocking test. The spacewalk, to be conducted by
Tsibliev and Lazutkin, is currently scheduled to begin at 9 p.m. EDT
July 11, if preparations for the activity are complete. If the crew is
not ready by July 11, Russian space officials said today that the crew
would conduct the spacewalk the night of July 14. The internal spacewalk
is scheduled to last five hours. Russian officials say the cosmonauts'
spacesuits can support work for six hours or more. A practice session is
scheduled for July 9, with July 10 set aside as a rest day for the crew.

NASA specialists, including veteran astronaut and Mir crewmember John
Blaha, are working with Russian technicians to fine-tune procedures for
the repair effort. The Progress resupply capsule carrying the needed
repair equipment to Mir is scheduled for launch at 12:11 a.m. EDT July
5, with a docking to Mir planned at 1:58 a.m. EDT on July 7. The 44
pounds of U.S.-supplied equipment delivered to the Progress included a
space shuttle medical kit; U.S. spacewalk tools such as a connector
tool, flashlight, and helmet visor anti-fog wipes, a personal hygiene
kit, batteries, and several computer hard drives, optical disks, cables,
a video card and a memory module. Russian managers will fly to the
Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakstan Thursday in preparation for Saturday's
launch.

Environmental conditions aboard the Mir remain stable and within normal
ranges. With the activation of gyrodyne #1 in the Kvant-2 module
yesterday, all the operational Mir gyrodynes (five in Kvant-1 and six in
Kvant-2) are spun up and providing automatic attitude control for the
station. The urine water recovery system was restarted Monday, but the
system's distillator, which turns the urine into water, is turned off to
conserve power for gyrodyne operations. The urine is currently being
stored with the brine left over from the normal distillation process.
The crew will also be working on the condensate recovery system.

The new Elektron oxygen-generating unit in Kvant-1 was turned off last
night due to overheating in the VGK cooling loop.  A faulty flow control
valve on the coolant loop is believed to be causing the temperature
increase.  This is being investigated.  Today, the crew will burn three
oxygen-generating candles to supplement their oxygen supply. The
Russians still hope to run the new Elektron oxygen-generating unit in
the Kvant-1 module for up to 10 hours a day to maintain normal oxygen
levels for the crew members. Longer operations would cause overheating
because the station's solar arrays must be pointed in such a way so as
to produce enough power for the Elektron, yet this same attitude can
cause overheating of the Kvant-1 module's docking node and potentially
overheat Kvant-1 systems. This problem will be eliminated, however, with
the docking of the new Progress capsule in that docking node.

The Mir Antares satellite receiver delivered by Atlantis in mid-May was
successfully installed Monday. The Mir satellite communication system
should be operational again after the installation of a second
transmitter/receiver unit which will be delivered on the new Progress.
The satellite system will enable the cosmonauts to expand their
communications capability with the Russian Mission Control Center.

Russian controllers continue their tests of the Progress vehicle which
collided with the Mir and plan to deorbit the capsule later this week,
where it will burn up in the atmosphere.

In science activities, Foale worked on the greenhouse experiment today
and the U.S./Russian science team will have him harvest the mature
plants and seeds when the plants have yellowed. Foale also assisted his
cosmonaut colleagues in initial preparations for the upcoming internal
spacewalk.
     _________________________________________________________________
           NASA Spacelink is a service of the Education Division
           of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.



Sat, 18 Dec 1999 03:00:00 GMT
 Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report #16 (6/13/97)


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report #16 (6/13/97)

[Downloaded from ftp.hq.nasa.gov]

Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report
Mission Control Center, Korolev, Russia
Wednesday, July 2,  1997,  9:30 a.m. EDT

The Russian Space Station Mir continues to orbit the Earth in stable condition,
with Mir 23 cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev, Flight Engineer Alexander
Lazutkin and U.S. astronaut Mike Foale, reporting that they are all in good
condition.  Today the crew continued their preparations for the internal
spacewalk to extend power cables from the damaged Spektr module into Mir's Core
module.  That spacewalk is scheduled for no earlier than July 11.  Tsibliev and
Lazutkin spent the morning preparing their spacesuits for the activity, which
could last about five hours.  Today, the cosmonauts replaced consumables such
water and oxygen in the space suits and recharged the suits' batteries.

The Progress resupply ship which collided with the Spektr a week ago was
commanded to deorbit at about 2 A.M. Eastern time this morning.  Russian flight
controllers reported a normal deorbit of the craft.  Data had been collected
from the ship over the past week to provide Russian officials any additional
insight into what may have caused the collision.

The new Progress resupply capsule carrying the needed repair equipment to Mir is
scheduled for launch at 12:11 a.m. EDT July 5 (11:11 p.m. CDT July 4), with a
docking to the Mir planned at 1:58 a.m. EDT  on July 7.

Environmental conditions aboard the Mir remain stable and within normal ranges.
As planned gyrodyne #3 in the Kvant-2 module was turned off overnight to
conserve power, but all other operational Mir gyrodynes (five in Kvant-1 and
five in Kvant-2) are spun up and are providing automatic attitude control for
the station.

The new Elektron oxygen-generating unit in Kvant-1 was turned off for a time
Monday due to a closed valve in the main cooling loop for the device.  Yesterday
the crew burned three oxygen-generating candles to supplement their oxygen
supply.  Earlier today, when the crew reopened the valve connecting that cooling
loop to the Core module, air that had been trapped in the loopp was introduced
into an adjacent cooling loop, creating a drop in differential pressure across
the two loop pumps.  Today the crew performed an air-to-water separation on the
joint loop.  The Elektron is expected to be restarted later today once
functionality of the loop has been restored.

The Mir Antares satellite receiver delivered by Atlantis in mid-May was
successfully installed Monday.  The Mir satellite communication system will be
operational once again to work in conjunction with Russian ground stations after
the installation of a second transmitter/receiver unit which will be delivered
on the new Progress.  The satellite system will enable the cosmonauts to expand
their communications capability with the Russian Mission Control Center.

Foale has been helping his Russian cosmonauts colleagues in the preparation for
the internal spacewalk.  Foale has assisted in systems activities such as the
routing of air vents and air tubes and spent part of his day checking out the
new Antares transmitter.  Foale also performed science activities, continuing to
work on the greenhouse experiment and the beetle experiment.  The greenhouse
experiment will run for most of the day today.



Sun, 19 Dec 1999 03:00:00 GMT
 Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report #16 (6/13/97)


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report #16 (6/13/97)

[Downloaded from NASA Spacelink]

Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report
Mission Control Center, Korolev, Russia
Thursday, July 3, 1997

Eight days after a collision with a Progress resupply craft, the Russian
Space Station Mir continues to orbit the Earth in stable condition, with
Mir 23 cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev, Flight Engineer Alexander
Lazutkin and U.S. astronaut Mike Foale, reporting that they are all in
good condition. Environmental conditions aboard the Mir remain stable and
within normal ranges.

The space station is stable and continues to maintain an attitude to
maximize solar power generation despite the spindown of of the Mir's
Kvant-1 module gyrodynes due to an apparent problem with a data interface
unit which sends commands from the station's attitude control computer to
the electrically-powered gyrodynes. Late Wednesday, the crew reported that
the five gyrodynes in Kvant-1 were spinning down, and that the Mir was
back on its reaction control thruster jets for attitude control. No jets
on the Soyuz capsule have been fired to support attitude control and the
Soyuz jets are not expected to be used for control of the complex. Two and
a half hours after the Kvant-1 gyrodynes spun down, the gyrodynes in
Kvant-2 also were spun down as a power saving measure.  Russian flight
controllers say the Mir is holding pinpoint stability in its orientation
to the sun. No problems are reported with Mir's solar arrays. The Mir will
remain in attitude through the use of its thruster jet system until the
cosmonauts troubleshoot the gyrodyne interface problem. Russian officials
believe the problem may be solved in a day or two.

Otherwise, the crew spent the day continuing to prepare for a possible
internal spacewalk to route solar array power cables housed in the sealed
off Spektr module to the Core module. Preparations today included
continuing checkouts of the spacesuits which will be worn by Tsibliev and
Lazutkin during the procedure. Foale will be housed in the Soyuz capsule
during the internal spacewalk. The spacewalk is currently planned for
around Mid- July, following the arrival of the next Progress resupply
ship. That Progress, which is carrying the needed repair equipment to Mir,
is scheduled for launch at 12:11 a.m. EDT July 5, with a docking to the
Mir planned at 1:58 a.m. EDT on Monday, July 7.

Tsibliev, Lazutkin and Foale successfully reactivated the Elektron
oxygen-generation unit in Kvant-1 today after reconfiguring cooling loops
associated with the device. The Elektron's oxygen's production and
performance is being monitored by the cosmonauts, who are continuing to
burn occassional oxygen candles to augment the Elektron's output of O2.

Today is the 144th day aboard Mir for Tsibliev and Lazutkin. Foale is
nearing the completion of his seventh week aboard the outpost.

     _________________________________________________________________
           NASA Spacelink is a service of the Education Division
           of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.



Mon, 20 Dec 1999 03:00:00 GMT
 Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report #16 (6/13/97)


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report #16 (6/13/97)

[Downloaded from NASA Spacelink]

Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report
Mission Control Center, Korolev, Russia
Friday, July 4, 1997

Nine days after a collision with a Progress resupply craft, the Russian
Space Station Mir continues to orbit the Earth in stable condition. The
Mir 23 cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev, Flight Engineer Alexander
Lazutkin and U.S. astronaut Mike Foale, report that they are all in good
condition. Environmental conditions aboard the Mir also remain stable and
within normal ranges.

The Elektron oxygen-generation unit in Kvant-1 has been active since
Thursday afternoon, providing the primary oxygen production capability for
the Mir. Its performance is being augmented by the occasional burning of
oxygen-generating candles to maintain the proper oxygen level on board.
Tsibliev, Lazutkin and Foale successfully reactivated the Elektron
yesterday after reconfiguring its associated cooling loops.

Today, the cosmonauts continued work to replace a faulty data processing
unit between the Mir's attitude control computer and the
electrically-powered gyrodynes which provide the main method for orienting
Mir to the sun to capture solar energy through its solar arrays. Through
the use of its reaction control system jets, however, Mir remains in a
steady attitude to maximize solar power generation. No jets on the Soyuz
capsule have been fired to maintain attitude control.

Late Wednesday, the crew reported that the five gyrodynes in Kvant-1 were
spinning down and that the Mir was using its thruster jets for attitude
control. The gyrodynes in Kvant-2 were later shut down to conserve power.
Russian officials said today that using the thruster jets to maintain
attitude control rather than through the use of the gyrodynes will have no
affect on Saturday's launching of a Progress resupply ship carrying repair
equipment for the Mir or Monday's docking of the new Progress to the
station. That Progress, which is carrying gear to enable Tsibiliev and
Lazutkin to relocate power cables from the solar arrays on the sealed-off
Spektr module, is still scheduled for launch at 12:11 a.m. EDT tomorrow
morning, with a docking to the Mir planned at 1:58 a.m. EDT on Monday,
July 7.

At the Russian Mission Control Center today, chief Russian Flight Director
Vladimir Solovyev said that the internal spacewalk into Spektr to recover
the solar array power cables is now tentatively scheduled for no earlier
than July 17 or 18 to ensure that all preparations and procedures are in
place for the activity, and to give the cosmonauts more time to unload the
new Progress resupply craft in a methodical manner. Solovyev also said
Russian flight controllers are considering connecting only two of the
three operational solar arrays on the Spektr module to Core module
batteries during the internal spacewalk.

A fourth array which is located parallel to the Mir's Kristall module was
damaged during the June 25th Progress collision. Today, several
cosmonauts, including Mir and Space Shuttle veteran Sergei Krikalev, began
refining the procedures for the internal spacewalk in the Hydrolab
facility at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, in Star City, just
outside Moscow. The Hydrolab is similar to the Neutral Buoyancy Facility
at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, in which astronauts train for
upcoming spacewalks.

Today is the 145th day aboard the Mir for Tsibliev and Lazutkin, who are
due to be replaced by another pair of Russian cosmonauts in early August.
Foale has completed seven weeks of his four-month mission aboard the
Russian outpost.

###
     _________________________________________________________________
           NASA Spacelink is a service of the Education Division
           of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.



Tue, 21 Dec 1999 03:00:00 GMT
 Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report #16 (6/13/97)


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report #16 (6/13/97)

[Downloaded from ftp.hq.nasa.gov]

Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report
Mission Control Center, Korolev, Russia
Saturday, July 5, 1997

Ten days after a collision with a Progress resupply craft, the Russian Space
Station Mir continues to orbit the Earth in stable condition.  At 12:11 a.m.
EDT, a Progress resupply vehicle was successfully launched from the Baikonur
Cosmodrome in Kazakstan with supplies for the three cosmonauts on board Mir and
hardware and tools for an internal spacewalk later this month to conduct
repairs as a result of the Progress collision.  The new Progress contains
additional power cables and a hermetic plate to modify the hatch to the sealed-
off Spektr module, which was damaged in the June 25th Progress collision.  Power
cables in Spektr which transfer electricity from its remaining operational solar
arrays are scheduled to be routed to the Mir's Core module through the modified
hatch during the internal spacewalk.

The new Progress also is carrying scientific equipment and computers, as well as
personal items for U.S. astronaut Mike Foale.  Russian flight controllers say
all systems are functioning normally aboard the Progress.  The craft is
scheduled to dock automatically to the Mir at about 1:58 a.m. EDT on Monday.

The Mir 23 cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev, Flight Engineer Alexander
Lazutkin and Foale, report that they are all in good condition.  Environmental
condirions aboard the Mir also remain stable and within normal ranges.  Over the
weekend the crew will continue its preparations for the internal spacewalk and
to prepare for the docking of the Progress.  Russian officials say the
spacewalk is tentatively planned for no earlier than July 17th or 18th.

The Elektron oxygen-generation unit in Kvant-1 continues to operate in normal
fashion, providing the primary oxygen production capability for the Mir.  Its
performance is being augmented by the occasional burning of oxygen-generating
candles to maintain the proper oxygen level on board.  Tsibliev, Lazutkin and
Foale successfully reactivated the Elektron after reconfiguring its associated
cooling loops.

Yesterday, the cosmonauts replaced a faulty data processing unit which routes
commands from the Mir's attitude control computer to the electrically-powered
gyrodynes which provide the main method for orienting Mir to the sun to capture
solar energy through its solar arrays.  A glitch with the data unit Thursday
resulted in the Mir returning to thruster jet control for a brief time to
remain oriented to the sun.  Once the unit was replaced, the gyrodynes were spun
up once again and the Mir returned to automatic attitude control earlier today.

At the Russian Mission Control Center today, chief Russian Flight Director
Vladimir Solovyev reported that everything is ready for the Progress docking on
Monday.  The Progress will dock using the "Kurs" system, the automatic docking
mode for the Mir station.  On Monday, veteran Russian cosmonauts will continue
to refine the procedures for the internal spacewalk in Spektr in the Hydrolab
facility at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, in Star City, just outside
Moscow.  The Hydrolab is similar to the Neutral Buoyancy Facility at the Johnson
Space Center in Houston, in which astronauts train for upcoming spacewalks.

Today is the 146th day aboard the Mir for Tsibliev and Lazutkin, who are due to
be replaced by another pair of Russian cosmonauts in early August.  Foale is now
in the eighth week of his four-month mission aboard the Russian outpost.



Wed, 22 Dec 1999 03:00:00 GMT
 Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report #16 (6/13/97)

<< Russian flight controllers say
all systems are functioning normally aboard the Progress>>

So the press reports about one Progress solar array not unfolding fully
are erroneous? It didn't appear to be a show-stopper anyway. This
operation, all the way through docking, is NOT one of those that worry me.



Wed, 22 Dec 1999 03:00:00 GMT
 Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report #16 (6/13/97)


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report #16 (6/13/97)

[Downloaded from ftp.hq.nasa.gov]

Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report
Mission Control Center, Korolev, Russia
Sunday, July 6, 1997

The Russian Space Station Mir continues to orbit the Earth in stable condition
as its crew awaits the planned docking of a Progress resupply capsule to the
station.  the Mir 23 cosmonauts Commander Vasily Tsibliev, Flight Engineer
Alexander Lazutkin and U.S. astronaut Mike Foale, report that they are all in
good condition.  The crew spent the day exercising and speaking to their
families.

The Progress resupply vehicle, which was launched Saturday morning from the
Baikonur Cosmodrome, is expected to link up to Mir through an automated docking
system at 1:58 A.M. EDT Monday, carrying supplies for a mid-July internal
spacewalk into the damaged Spektr module.  The supplies aboard the new Progress
include additional power cables and a hermetic hatch plate for the entrance to
the Spektr module.  Cables from the Spektr module will be attached to the
specially modified plate, allowing the crew to regain power from the three
Spektr solar arrays which were not damaged in the collision of another Progress
vehicle with the Mir during a manual docking test on June 25th.  The internal
spacewalk is tentatively planned for no earlier than July 17 or 18.

Russian space officials reported that the Progress' systems are functioning
normally and that a series of rendezvous burns have placed the Progress on a
precise course for the Mir.

On Monday, Russian specialists and veteran cosmonauts with spacewalking
experience plan to continue refining the procedures for the internal spacewalk
in the Hydrolab facility at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, Star City,
just outside Moscow.  The Hydrolab is a large pool, similar to the Neutral
Buoyancy Facility at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, in which astronauts
train for upcoming spacewalks.

Environmental conditions aboard the Mir remain stable and within normal ranges.
The Elektron oxygen-generation unit in Kvant-1 has been active since Thursday
afternoon, providing the primary oxygen production capability for the Mir.  Its
performance is being augmented by the occasional burning of oxygen-generating
candles to maintain the proper oxygen level on board.  The crew reported
comfortable temperatures and humidity levels onboard.

Yesterday, the Mir's gyrodyne attitude control system was fully recovered, with
10 of 11 available gyrodynes operational.  On Friday, the cosmonauts replaced a
faulty power and data processing unit which acts as an interface between the
Mir's attitude control computer and the electrically powered gyrodynes.  The
gyrodynes provide the main method for orienting Mir to the sun to capture
solar energy through its solar arrays.

Today is the 147th day aboard the Mir for Tsibliev and Lazutkin, who are due to
be replace by another pair of Russian cosmonauts in early August.  Foale is in
the eighth week of his four-month mission aboard the Russian outpost.  The crew
was informed of the Pathfinder landing on Mars and wil be sent, electronically,
the first photo taken of the newly named Sagan Memorial Station, the lander from
which the Sojourner rover drove off of early this morning to begin its Martian
surface exploration.



Thu, 23 Dec 1999 03:00:00 GMT
 Mir 23/NASA 5 Status Report #16 (6/13/97)


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 
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