warning to people considering the excimer operation for myopia 
Author Message
 warning to people considering the excimer operation for myopia

Having had the operation, I want to warn anyone considering it to discuss
in detail with their doctor, in advance, the effect the successful
elimination of their myopia will have on their reading ability -
particularly if you are in your late thirties or early 40s and have not
yet experienced the onset of presbyopia. My doctor "forgot" to mention
this before the operation, and I woke up from the operation with almost
perfect distance vision - but to my horror, I could no longer read! I
needed what are euphemistically called "reading glasses" immediately after
my operation. Since I spend about 90% of my time reading, it turns out I
exchanged attractive minus lenses for unattractive, "fish-eye" producing,
granny-looking glasses! I aged 10 years overnight. Even at 25, you might
think that 40 is a long time away and it does not matter. Well, you may
regret that when the time comes. Had I known then what I know now, I would
have chosen to remain under-corrected by about -1.25. I no longer wanted to
be dependent on a piece of plastic to function - but I am more dependent
than ever. It is of no use to me to be able to see perfectly 20 feet away
when I cannot see clearly what is in front of my nose - or on my desk.

Hope the same won't happen to you.

Ann



Sat, 09 May 1998 03:00:00 GMT
 warning to people considering the excimer operation for myopia
Ann,
did you sign a written informed consent to surgery?  Was this point
elucidated in it?  If not, you have a very valid point.  It saddens me to
hear this story as you should have been informed of this up fron.  This
is one of the first points we make at our clinic before any refractive
surgery.  

M. Wilson, OD



Tue, 12 May 1998 03:00:00 GMT
 warning to people considering the excimer operation for myopia

Quote:

>Having had the operation, I want to warn anyone considering it to discuss
>in detail with their doctor, in advance, the effect the successful
>elimination of their myopia will have on their reading ability -
>particularly if you are in your late thirties or early 40s and have not
>yet experienced the onset of presbyopia. My doctor "forgot" to mention
>this before the operation, and I woke up from the operation with almost
>perfect distance vision - but to my horror, I could no longer read! I
>needed what are euphemistically called "reading glasses" immediately after
>my operation. Since I spend about 90% of my time reading, it turns out I
>exchanged attractive minus lenses for unattractive, "fish-eye" producing,
>granny-looking glasses! I aged 10 years overnight. Even at 25, you might
>think that 40 is a long time away and it does not matter. Well, you may
>regret that when the time comes. Had I known then what I know now, I would
>have chosen to remain under-corrected by about -1.25. I no longer wanted to
>be dependent on a piece of plastic to function - but I am more dependent
>than ever. It is of no use to me to be able to see perfectly 20 feet away
>when I cannot see clearly what is in front of my nose - or on my desk.

>Hope the same won't happen to you.

>Ann

Not a very positive experience report, Ann.  I had PRK on both of my
eyes recently and, though it is clear that this is no "miracle"
treatment, I have been reasonably satisfied with the results.  I do
not have the problems you describe with reading.  I am having some
difficulty with distance.  I can see will enough to drive, but I would
not want to try to find a specific street in an unfamiliar city.  I
may get "driving" glasses, or go for a re-treatment.

When did you have the treatment?  Could it be possible that you are
still healing?  Is it possible for you to be re-trreated to adjust,
say, one eye for distance and one for close up?  Which clinic did you
use?

You make a good point about getting all of the details and risks
explained to you by your doctor.  It is a good idea to talk it over
with your GP, although your GP would probably say that surgery is
surgery, and all surgery has risks.

If you are interested, I have a homepage with a link to a detailed
report on my experience with PRK.  Check it out at
http://www.synapse.net/~hurleyp/.  I'll be updating it within the next
day or two.

Paul



Tue, 12 May 1998 03:00:00 GMT
 warning to people considering the excimer operation for myopia
Ann

What was your pre-op correction numbers?



Mon, 18 May 1998 03:00:00 GMT
 warning to people considering the excimer operation for myopia
I had PRK done on my left eye on Nov 3 (was -6.5D before). My eye went to
20/20 within 2 weeks. I have no difficulty reading now with my left eye. I do
have some hazyness at night, but it doesn't affect my driving at all. I
also had minimum pain. So far, I am quite happy with it. I will get my other
eye done Dec 8 (-4.75D).

I don't know how much variation there is from person to person in terms of
the results. Maybe my results are a best-case scenario. I'll have to see
how well my right eye does, then wait half a year to see how things finalize.

Marc



Wed, 20 May 1998 03:00:00 GMT
 
 [ 5 post ] 

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