switching from a lifetime of hard lenses/rpgs to soft lenses with severe myopia 
Author Message
 switching from a lifetime of hard lenses/rpgs to soft lenses with severe myopia

I am considering switching to softlenses after a lifetime of hard lenses/RPG.

I am very myopic, although I have always been correctable to perfect enough
vision with my contacts.

Someone in my other (presbyobia) thread said something that got me thinking:
Can someone with very strong nearsightedness be corrected with soft lenses?
Is that a factor, or is that irrelevant in this day and age.

Thanks.  (Keep in mind I am looking for bi or multifocal lenses given time is
marching on and with it, presbyopia).

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Thu, 29 Jan 2009 22:09:48 GMT
 switching from a lifetime of hard lenses/rpgs to soft lenses with severe myopia


Quote:
> Someone in my other (presbyobia) thread said something that got me
> thinking:
> Can someone with very strong nearsightedness be corrected with soft
> lenses?
> Is that a factor, or is that irrelevant in this day and age.

For most companies like Acuvue, the upper limit is usually 12 diopters.

Ciba Precision UV is available to -16, and Gelflex to -20.

Quote:
> Thanks.  (Keep in mind I am looking for bi or multifocal lenses given time
> is
> marching on and with it, presbyopia).

Acuvue bifocals stop at -9, several others up to -10, plus many custom
lenses up to -20.

-MT



Fri, 30 Jan 2009 02:17:35 GMT
 switching from a lifetime of hard lenses/rpgs to soft lenses with severe myopia
marcia_jay via MedKB.com schreef:

Quote:
> I am considering switching to softlenses after a lifetime of hard lenses/RPG.

Why the switch, what kind of improvement do you aspect?

Jan (normally Dutch spoken)



Fri, 30 Jan 2009 02:20:57 GMT
 switching from a lifetime of hard lenses/rpgs to soft lenses with severe myopia
Well, it's not so much that I am looking for improvement. I need to do
something, anyway, to take care of the presbyopia.  So some sort of decision
needs to be made.

And it is becoming harder and harder to find solutions for the RPGs, as the
softlense solutions take over the shelves.

Outside of the presbyopia situation, I am happy with my lenses. Oh, the bad
thing is that they are about a million years old and I probably should
replace them anyway.

Quote:

>marcia_jay via MedKB.com schreef:
>> I am considering switching to softlenses after a lifetime of hard lenses/RPG.

>Why the switch, what kind of improvement do you aspect?

>Jan (normally Dutch spoken)

--
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Fri, 30 Jan 2009 02:59:12 GMT
 switching from a lifetime of hard lenses/rpgs to soft lenses with severe myopia
OK, I am not sure what a "diopter" is.  

I went to a guy I ended up not going back to cause I didn't like  him.  I
have a piece of paper, a prescription blank that has these numbers on them.
I have no idea what that means, but if you can tell and they fall within
range that would allow me to at least consider soft lenses, that would be
very helpful:

BC  7.30  - 12.00   The next number has what looks like "Dia" or could be
"Diq" over it, which could be what you are talking about (his handwriting!)...
and it says 8.5.

I don't know what these mean, but maybe someone else does. There is a second
set of numbers that are almost the same.

Quote:

>> Someone in my other (presbyobia) thread said something that got me
>> thinking:
>> Can someone with very strong nearsightedness be corrected with soft
>> lenses?
>> Is that a factor, or is that irrelevant in this day and age.

>For most companies like Acuvue, the upper limit is usually 12 diopters.

>Ciba Precision UV is available to -16, and Gelflex to -20.

>> Thanks.  (Keep in mind I am looking for bi or multifocal lenses given time
>> is
>> marching on and with it, presbyopia).

>Acuvue bifocals stop at -9, several others up to -10, plus many custom
>lenses up to -20.

>-MT

--
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Fri, 30 Jan 2009 03:03:13 GMT
 switching from a lifetime of hard lenses/rpgs to soft lenses with severe myopia

Quote:

> OK, I am not sure what a "diopter" is.

> I went to a guy I ended up not going back to cause I didn't like  him.  I
> have a piece of paper, a prescription blank that has these numbers on them.
> I have no idea what that means, but if you can tell and they fall within
> range that would allow me to at least consider soft lenses, that would be
> very helpful:

> BC  7.30  - 12.00   The next number has what looks like "Dia" or could be
> "Diq" over it, which could be what you are talking about (his handwriting!)...
> and it says 8.5.

> I don't know what these mean, but maybe someone else does. There is a second
> set of numbers that are almost the same.

A diopter is a unit of refractive error. BC of 7.3 is very tight. Soft
contacts usually have a BC of 8.6 but range from 8 to 9. That -12 is
your prescription, you were not kidding about your extremely high
myopia! -12 contacts would be comparable to -15 glasses or around that
depending on the eye. Multiply 1.25(contacts) to arrive at glasses. My
glasses prescription is -5 and I see just as well with -4 soft
contacts. Some -5 glasses eyes may only need -3.5 contacts, others may
need as high as -4.75 contacts! its strange how there is a variance for
that. Even different contact brands dont give the same refractive
power. To compare apples to apples, glasses values are the accurate
ones. 8.5 is the diameter. RGP contacts are small and guys like me with
huge 9mm+ pupils would have problems in low light with RGPs. Id need a
special macro lens or *gasp* a scleral lens! Those things are so big,
it is scary! My eyes arent that horrible at -4.5 and -5 so I correct
quite well with glasses and am getting orthoK.

You might need slightly more than -12 soft contacts. There are very few
brands that go past -12. But I have an idea, why not undercorrect
yourself with contacts so you *dont* need reading glasses all day for
the job you do and only need distance glasses for driving? You can wear
a 2nd pair of full power contacts for distance like when you go out to
a movie. Presbyopia neednt be a problem, a simple undercorrection takes
care of that.



Fri, 30 Jan 2009 05:08:23 GMT
 switching from a lifetime of hard lenses/rpgs to soft lenses with severe myopia
Thanks. But what I am looking for is one set of lenses that I pop in first
thing in the morning, and take out at night before I go to bed.

As it is, I am popping my lenses in and out, putting on glasses (which I HATE)
, all day long.

Can't drive in glasses. My depth perception is drastically different in
glasses, I never set foot out the door with them. Even navagating stairs is
too iffy. I have been in contacts since my t{*filter*}s and learned to drive in
them and am used to the depth perception of the contacts.

I really just want a one-step solution.  Just trying to get myself educated
before I chose and go in to a new optometrist.

Quote:

>> OK, I am not sure what a "diopter" is.

>[quoted text clipped - 10 lines]
>> I don't know what these mean, but maybe someone else does. There is a second
>> set of numbers that are almost the same.

>A diopter is a unit of refractive error. BC of 7.3 is very tight. Soft
>contacts usually have a BC of 8.6 but range from 8 to 9. That -12 is
>your prescription, you were not kidding about your extremely high
>myopia! -12 contacts would be comparable to -15 glasses or around that
>depending on the eye. Multiply 1.25(contacts) to arrive at glasses. My
>glasses prescription is -5 and I see just as well with -4 soft
>contacts. Some -5 glasses eyes may only need -3.5 contacts, others may
>need as high as -4.75 contacts! its strange how there is a variance for
>that. Even different contact brands dont give the same refractive
>power. To compare apples to apples, glasses values are the accurate
>ones. 8.5 is the diameter. RGP contacts are small and guys like me with
>huge 9mm+ pupils would have problems in low light with RGPs. Id need a
>special macro lens or *gasp* a scleral lens! Those things are so big,
>it is scary! My eyes arent that horrible at -4.5 and -5 so I correct
>quite well with glasses and am getting orthoK.

>You might need slightly more than -12 soft contacts. There are very few
>brands that go past -12. But I have an idea, why not undercorrect
>yourself with contacts so you *dont* need reading glasses all day for
>the job you do and only need distance glasses for driving? You can wear
>a 2nd pair of full power contacts for distance like when you go out to
>a movie. Presbyopia neednt be a problem, a simple undercorrection takes
>care of that.

--
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Fri, 30 Jan 2009 05:27:36 GMT
 switching from a lifetime of hard lenses/rpgs to soft lenses with severe myopia

Quote:

> >marcia_jay via MedKB.com schreef:
> >> I am considering switching to softlenses after a lifetime of hard lenses/RPG.

> Message posted via MedKB.com
> http://www.medkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/vision/200608/1

You need to realize that many people switching from
rigid to soft lenses have to get used to their vision not
being quite as "crisp" and many complain about this
difference in vision.

So if you're an engineer or something, I would not
recommend the switch.

frank



Fri, 30 Jan 2009 06:16:14 GMT
 switching from a lifetime of hard lenses/rpgs to soft lenses with severe myopia
I'm an editor, so crisp could be important.  When you say not "crisp" do  you
mean sort of blurry?

Let me put it to you this way, I have to  be 100% sure of each letter I am
reading, that's what being an editor involves.

Will it become crisp over time?  Or is that just the deal with soft lenses?

Quote:

>> >marcia_jay via MedKB.com schreef:
>> >> I am considering switching to softlenses after a lifetime of hard lenses/RPG.

>> Message posted via MedKB.com
>> http://www.medkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/vision/200608/1

>You need to realize that many people switching from
>rigid to soft lenses have to get used to their vision not
>being quite as "crisp" and many complain about this
>difference in vision.

>So if you're an engineer or something, I would not
>recommend the switch.

>frank

--
Message posted via MedKB.com
http://www.medkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/vision/200608/1


Fri, 30 Jan 2009 06:46:50 GMT
 switching from a lifetime of hard lenses/rpgs to soft lenses with severe myopia

Quote:

> Thanks. But what I am looking for is one set of lenses that I pop in first
> thing in the morning, and take out at night before I go to bed.

> As it is, I am popping my lenses in and out, putting on glasses (which I HATE)
> , all day long.

> Can't drive in glasses. My depth perception is drastically different in
> glasses, I never set foot out the door with them. Even navagating stairs is
> too iffy. I have been in contacts since my t{*filter*}s and learned to drive in
> them and am used to the depth perception of the contacts.

> I really just want a one-step solution.  Just trying to get myself educated
> before I chose and go in to a new optometrist.

With your presbyopia, the only way that will be possible is monovision
or a bifocal design. Monovision is not tolerated by most and itll ruin
your depth of perception and make things blurry in one eye at all
times, very annoying, ive tried it and hate it! You do not need to put
on glasses, no point in glasses when contacts can do the job. I have an
idea, what if you pop in your full power contacts in the morning and
when you get to work, pop them out and pop in weaker contacts so you
can do your edit{*filter*}work all day then when you are ready to go home,
pop in your full power contacts? The other alternative I see is pop in
your weaker contacts and only wear a thin pair of glasses(which does
not distort and minify much) for driving to work and back. Much less
hassle than wearing reading glasses all day at work or swapping
contacts. I know several very high myopes who did just that, they wore
weaker contacts to undercorrect them so they can see without reading
glasses and only need distance glasses for driving!


Fri, 30 Jan 2009 08:15:58 GMT
 switching from a lifetime of hard lenses/rpgs to soft lenses with severe myopia


Quote:
> I'm an editor, so crisp could be important.  When you say not "crisp" do
> you
> mean sort of blurry?

Yes.

Quote:
> Let me put it to you this way, I have to  be 100% sure of each letter I am
> reading, that's what being an editor involves.

It doesn't bode well for the success of bifocal soft lenses.

-MT



Fri, 30 Jan 2009 09:07:46 GMT
 switching from a lifetime of hard lenses/rpgs to soft lenses with severe myopia
nor does it bode well for the use of bifocal RGPs, at least
simultaneous vision lenses.

your best luck will likely come with use of readers over distance
corrected contacts, or monovision.  i agree that bifocal contacts will
give you some degree of blurring and that might be unacceptable to you
given your near requirements.

BTW, disregard the remarks of Ace.  he is not a trained eye doctor so
his misunderstanding of RGP base curves, the interaction of lens
curvature and corneal curvature, and the difference between base curves
used for soft versus hard lenses renders his advise useless.  he tries
to help but his understanding is limited to what he has read on the
internet.

knowing your RGP prescription is useful only if we also knew your
corneal K readings.  I would assume that the doctor who fit you in
8.5mm diameter lenses might be fitting them steep to make them center
well and therefore must give you a compensatory higher minus
prescription.  no matter, i am sure that you could be fitted in soft
lenses even if your prescription really is as high -12.00 D.  whether
you believe that your hard lenses give you crisper vision as compared
to the soft lenses is something that you will need to experience for
yourself.  It is indeed true that RGP wearers sometimes claim that
their vision is clearer than they could get in soft lenses.  however i
have also had many RGP wearers who switched to soft lenses remark on
the improved comfort of soft lenses without noting any difference in
visual sharpness.  its an individual thing.

Quote:


> > I'm an editor, so crisp could be important.  When you say not "crisp" do
> > you
> > mean sort of blurry?

> Yes.

> > Let me put it to you this way, I have to  be 100% sure of each letter I am
> > reading, that's what being an editor involves.

> It doesn't bode well for the success of bifocal soft lenses.

> -MT



Fri, 30 Jan 2009 09:29:31 GMT
 switching from a lifetime of hard lenses/rpgs to soft lenses with severe myopia
your best luck will likely come with use of readers over distance
corrected contacts, or monovision.  i agree that bifocal contacts will
give you some degree of blurring and that might be unacceptable to you
given your near requirements.

She already mentioned that reading glasses make her dizzy and caused
blurred vision after short use. You dont read what she says! The other
problem I see is why should she wear glasses all day which she hates
when she can just undercorrect herself with weaker contacts and be
glasses free?



Fri, 30 Jan 2009 10:46:18 GMT
 switching from a lifetime of hard lenses/rpgs to soft lenses with severe myopia

Quote:

> OK, I am not sure what a "diopter" is.

> I went to a guy I ended up not going back to cause I didn't like  him.  I
> have a piece of paper, a prescription blank that has these numbers on them.
> I have no idea what that means, but if you can tell and they fall within
> range that would allow me to at least consider soft lenses, that would be
> very helpful:

> BC  7.30  - 12.00   The next number has what looks like "Dia" or could be
> "Diq" over it, which could be what you are talking about (his handwriting!)...
> and it says 8.5.

> I don't know what these mean, but maybe someone else does. There is a second
> set of numbers that are almost the same.

Those are the specifications for your rigid lenses.  You will need your
glasses prescription to know if soft lenses are an option; it is not
possible to tell from a rigid lens prescription if you have significant
astigmatism.  Soft lenses to correct both presbyopia and astigmatism
are much more difficult to fit and vision is often not as good as with
rigid lenses.

There are multifocal rigid lenses, so you don't need to switch to soft
just to get multifocal correction; although tricky to fit and expensive
they will likely deliver crisper vision to you than soft multifocals.
You will need to find a contact lens fitting specialist with lots of
rigid multifocal fitting experience.

PS:  Ace is a high school student whose advice is based entirely on
what he has read, not on any experience.

Dr Judy



Fri, 30 Jan 2009 11:52:51 GMT
 switching from a lifetime of hard lenses/rpgs to soft lenses with severe myopia
why do you keep butting in Nancy?  you don't understand presbyopia
being nothing more than a kid who has a {*filter*} with vision problems who
likes to read things on the internet when they aren't eating
hallucinogenic mushrooms.

back to the subject, as you would also know if you had any clinical
experience, and would have even read if you read deeper into the
thread, is that dizziness with reading glasses when you first use them
is common in presbyopes.  it will pass.  simply start with the weakest
ones available and within a few days this common problem will go away.
so no-- it didn't ignor it.  i just understood it.

and secondly,. are you really recommending that she wear undercorrected
RGPs in both eyes that are weak enough for her to read with?  of course
you realize that she wouldn't see squat far away and wouldn't be able
to walk around her office building, drive, etc. comfortably.  doesn't
that seem to you to be a rather inadequate solution?

=============

Quote:

> your best luck will likely come with use of readers over distance
> corrected contacts, or monovision.  i agree that bifocal contacts will
> give you some degree of blurring and that might be unacceptable to you
> given your near requirements.

> She already mentioned that reading glasses make her dizzy and caused
> blurred vision after short use. You dont read what she says! The other
> problem I see is why should she wear glasses all day which she hates
> when she can just undercorrect herself with weaker contacts and be
> glasses free?



Fri, 30 Jan 2009 19:17:39 GMT
 
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