Over Dose: Jay Cohen on statins and marketing hype 
Author Message
 Over Dose: Jay Cohen on statins and marketing hype

"Pharmaceutical companies are waging aggressive campaigns to change
prescribers' habits and to distinguish their products from competing
ones, even when products are virtually indistinguishable. Victory in
these therapeutic-class wars can mean millions [billions today] of
dollars for a drug company. But for patients and providers it can mean
misleading promotions, conflicts of interest, increased costs for
health care, and ultimately, inappropriate prescribing.18"

From: http://www.***.com/

THE TRUTH ABOUT CRESTOR: IS CRESTOR DANGEROUS AND, IF SO, WHY? The
Intensive Marketing of This New, Super-Strong, Cholesterol-Lowering
Statin Drug Raises Questions and Concerns. Are Crestor Users in
Jeopardy? Is Crestor Especially Dangerous for Asians? Who Should Take
Crestor and When? A Lower, Safer Approach That Most Doctors and
Patients Don't Know About.

What is Crestor and What Is the Problem?

Crestor is the newest statin and the strongest statin yet. Statins are
the highly touted {*filter*} for reducing cholesterol. Studies clearly show
that statins improve cholesterol numbers (by lowering LDL and raising
HDL) and may reduce C-reactive protein. Statins impede
atherosclerosis, reduce heart attacks and strokes, and cardiac death.
Thus, the statins Lipitor and Zocor are not only the #1 and #2
top-selling {*filter*} in America, but also household names.

Other statins include Pravachol, Mevacor, and Lescol -- and now
ultra-potent Crestor. Until 2001, there was another statin: Baycol. It
was then the newest statin and a potent statin -- until it was
withdrawn because of dozens of deaths. Is Crestor another Lipitor or
another Baycol? Although Crestor has been on the market only a year,
it has already been linked to numerous cases of severe muscle
breakdown, kidney toxicity, and deaths. Public Citizen recently
petitioned the FDA to ban Crestor.

The Marketing of Super-Strong Crestor
Crestor's introduction in August 2003 provides a textbook example of
how marketing strategies can supersede medical science and common
sense. Taking a page from Lipitor's highly successful marketing
campaign in 1997, Crestor is now being aggressively marketed as the
strongest statin of all.

The manufacturer's recommended initial dose of Crestor is 10 mg/day
(except for people with kidney problems). This dosage is so strong
that Crestor's advertising can boast it is stronger than equivalent
doses of any other statin. This is quite a claim, because Lipitor and
Zocor are pretty strong themselves. Indeed, their top-selling status
has been built on their own advertising about their power to reduce
cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels.

But more isn't necessarily better with most medications, including
statins. As I've written in medical journal articles and in my
upcoming book (What You Need To Know About Statin {*filter*} And Their
Natural Alternatives),1 the standard starting doses of Lipitor and
Zocor are often double or quadruple the amounts that millions of
people actually need, triggering many avoidable side effects. So what
can we say about super-strong Crestor, which is even stronger? We can
say that the drug company-recommended, super-strong initial 10-mg dose
of Crestor has already been linked to severe toxicities.1A This should
not surprise anyone.

Excessive Doses = More Side Effects
One of my basic principles is: The best dose of any medication is the
least amount that works. Medical science agrees. Most people with
elevated cholesterol or LDL-C have mild-to-moderate elevations. For
many, dietary interventions are enough. For others, modest statin
doses are often plenty. But the recommended initial doses of Lipitor,
Zocor, and Pravachol are strong, yet that's what doctors prescribe to
most people, even to people who don't need such strong statin therapy.
This is the crux of the problem of statin side effects such as muscle
aches, joint pains, abdominal discomfort, memory and cognitive
impairment.2-6 Side effects are a major reason that 60%-75% of people
started on statins quit treatment.7,8 The average time until they
discontinue treatment: 8 months. Many people quit within a few months.

Liver injury, liver toxicity, and death are also concerns with
statins. Like other statin side effects, these reactions are
dose-related: the greater the dose, the greater the risk. Dr. W.C.
Roberts, the editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Cardiology,
warns: "With each doubling of the [statin] dose, the frequency of
liver enzyme elevations [indicating liver irritation or injury] also
doubles.9"

Nerve injuries have now been documented in people taking statins
long-term.10, 11 The incidence is low, perhaps 1 in 2000 to 5,000, but
with millions taking statins, this adverse effect will afflict
thousands of people each year. These injuries can be severe and
permanent, and even mild nerve injuries can take months to fade away.

Doctors cannot anticipate who will develop a long-term side effect
with statins, but doctors should (but usually don't) anticipate that
they will occur in some people. The only defense: using the least
amount of medication you need.

Do We Need a Stronger Statin?
The standard starting dose of Crestor is 10 mg, which reduces LDL-C a
whopping 46%-52%.12 Some people, especially those with serious
coronary disease, require this degree of LDL-C reduction, but most
people with elevated cholesterol require only 20%-30% reductions --
and therefore much less medication.

Crestor's manufacturer does recommend a lower 5-mg dose for people
requiring "less aggressive LDL-C reductions.12" Yet, 5-mg Crestor
reduces LDL-C 42%, still far more than most people with elevated
cholesterol need.

And remember, this 42% LDL-C reduction represents the average among
study subjects. Many people get even greater reductions with this
dosage. In one study, 5 mg of Crestor reduced LDL-C as much as 71% in
subjects.13 This is an impressive number, but reducing cholesterol too
aggressively is believed to be a trigger for cognitive, memory, and
mood problems with statins. And too low cholesterol levels aren't good
either, because cholesterol is a necessary building block in human
cells and a substrate of many of our hormones.

So contrary to Crestor's marketing, we shouldn't be overly impressed
with which statin is strongest. You don't want the strongest statin.
You want the mildest statin that works for you.

Lower, Safer Doses of Crestor Work --
But Your Doctor Doesn't Know About Them
The lowest marketed dose of Crestor is 5 mg. Yet, studies show that
2.5 mg of Crestor reduces LDL-C 40%, and just 1 mg reduces LDL-C 34%,
on average.13, 14 These doses are still stronger than the standard
initial doses of Pravachol, Mevacor, Zocor, and Lescol, and they would
certainly be strong enough for most people with elevated cholesterol.
Indeed, the lead author of one Crestor study stated: "Even at 1
mg/day, rosuvastatin [Crestor] reduced LDL-C by 35%, the same
percentage reduction seen with simvastatin [Zocor] 20 and 40 mg.14"

Yet, you won't find any information about this in the Crestor package
insert,12 pharmacy slips, or the Physicians' Desk Reference.2
Crestor's manufacturer isn't going to inform you or your doctor about
lower Crestor doses that aren't available, even if they are effective
-- and safer. This goes right to the heart of the issue of informed
consent. Your right of informed consent is denied if you aren't given
enough information to make an intelligent choice.15 You aren't alone:
one study showed that only 9% of office patients receive enough
information to fulfill their right of informed consent .16 No wonder
medication side effects continue to be one of the leading causes of
death in America.

The Marketing of Crestor
Why isn't Crestor marketed at lower, safer doses? Drug companies like
to keep dosing simple, because simple dosing makes doctors' job
easier. The fact is, doctors are inadequately trained about
medications. Their one pharmacology course covers hundreds upon
hundreds of {*filter*}, but not deeply. Doctors assume that drug companies
and the FDA are providing complete information with the best doses,
when in fact they aren't. That's why doctors rarely question
irrational drug company guidelines even when the guidelines tell
doctors to prescribe the same strong doses to young and old, big and
small, healthy and frail.

I could list hundreds of quotes about problems with drug research and
marketing, but the following two will suffice. The first is from Dr.
Andrew Herxheimer, the highly respected expert at Britain's renowned
Cochrane Coalition:

"{*filter*} are often introduced at a dose that will be effective in around
90% of the target population, because this helps market penetration.
The 25% of patients who are most sensitive to the drug get much more
than they need.17"

Actually, with statins, the number is probably much higher. Dr. David
Kessler, when he was FDA commissioner, wrote this about marketing
strategies vs. medical science:

"Pharmaceutical companies are waging aggressive campaigns to change
prescribers' habits and to distinguish their products from competing
ones, even when products are virtually indistinguishable. Victory in
these therapeutic-class wars can mean millions [billions today] of
dollars for a drug company. But for patients and providers it can mean
misleading promotions, conflicts of interest, increased costs for
health care, and ultimately, inappropriate prescribing.18"

My articles and books contain dozens of examples of excessively dosed
{*filter*}. Crestor is another. In October 2003, Dr. Richard Horton, editor
of the British Medical Journal, published a scathing critique of
Crestor's marketing, stating that the manufacturer's tactics "raise
disturbing questions about how {*filter*} enter clinical practice and what
measures exist to protect patients from inadequately investigated
medicines...." Yet, Horton added, the manufacturer will "do whatever
it takes to persuade doctors to prescribe rosuvastatin, ...

read more »



Wed, 27 Dec 2006 03:13:58 GMT
 Over Dose: Jay Cohen on statins and marketing hype
Let me ask you a stupid question. If all Statins are the same then why do
they make a distinction in this article? If all Statins are the same then
why switch from one to the other? If all Statins cause damage at all levels
then why mention dosage effects?
You are so desperate to find negative articles of statins that you don't
even care if it is contradictory to your own views.

"Who actually needs Crestor? Hardly anyone. Other statins have much
longer track records and should be used first. The respected Medical
Letter on {*filter*} and Therapeutics agrees, recommending Crestor only for
"non-Asian patients who have not responded adequately to statins with
a longer record.21"
If you are feeling bold, ask your doctor why he/she is suggesting the
least-known, most-powerful statin that already has been linked to
multiple toxicities, rather than better known, apparently safer other
statins. Until we hold our own doctors accountable for their
thoughtless decisions, nothing will change and our children will be
subjected to the same drug-company controlled health care system."

Good advice switch to the better known, safer statin. You better ask your
thoughtless doctors first and check to see if they have stock in a drug
company also. Nice!!!!!!
Don't forget to buy his book and read about horror stories.



Wed, 27 Dec 2006 04:31:41 GMT
 Over Dose: Jay Cohen on statins and marketing hype
Should doctors be required to post a sign in their office listing which drug
companies they own stock in?
I know as a stockholder in various companies that stock ownership influences
me where I purchase  items and what brands of items I use.

There are certain drug companies that exist because they sold their stock
directly to doctors who then prescribed their products. Often the companies
started by selling branded copies of {*filter*} that were available as generics.
Their so-called branded generics were then sold to pharmacies at prices
equal to many brand name products that were developed by basic research.

Eventually unless the drug companies control their prices we will all be
taking every generic drug made as the HMO's , State and Federal government
will get tired of paying the bill. The Fed needs that money for the great
and glorious war of the month program.


<snip>

Quote:
> Good advice switch to the better known, safer statin. You better ask your

thoughtless doctors first and check to see if they have stock in a drug
Quote:
> company also. Nice!!!!!!> Don't forget to buy his book and read about
horror stories.



Wed, 27 Dec 2006 05:10:36 GMT
 Over Dose: Jay Cohen on statins and marketing hype
Trollpost

Clue: crossposting all over the show
Action: DO NOT FEED the troll.


Quote:
> "Pharmaceutical companies are waging aggressive campaigns to change
> prescribers' habits and to distinguish their products from competing
> ones, even when products are virtually indistinguishable. Victory in
> these therapeutic-class wars can mean millions [billions today] of
> dollars for a drug company. But for patients and providers it can mean
> misleading promotions, conflicts of interest, increased costs for
> health care, and ultimately, inappropriate prescribing.18"

> From: http://www.***.com/

> THE TRUTH ABOUT CRESTOR: IS CRESTOR DANGEROUS AND, IF SO, WHY? The
> Intensive Marketing of This New, Super-Strong, Cholesterol-Lowering
> Statin Drug Raises Questions and Concerns. Are Crestor Users in
> Jeopardy? Is Crestor Especially Dangerous for Asians? Who Should Take
> Crestor and When? A Lower, Safer Approach That Most Doctors and
> Patients Don't Know About.

> What is Crestor and What Is the Problem?

> Crestor is the newest statin and the strongest statin yet. Statins are
> the highly touted {*filter*} for reducing cholesterol. Studies clearly show
> that statins improve cholesterol numbers (by lowering LDL and raising
> HDL) and may reduce C-reactive protein. Statins impede
> atherosclerosis, reduce heart attacks and strokes, and cardiac death.
> Thus, the statins Lipitor and Zocor are not only the #1 and #2
> top-selling {*filter*} in America, but also household names.

> Other statins include Pravachol, Mevacor, and Lescol -- and now
> ultra-potent Crestor. Until 2001, there was another statin: Baycol. It
> was then the newest statin and a potent statin -- until it was
> withdrawn because of dozens of deaths. Is Crestor another Lipitor or
> another Baycol? Although Crestor has been on the market only a year,
> it has already been linked to numerous cases of severe muscle
> breakdown, kidney toxicity, and deaths. Public Citizen recently
> petitioned the FDA to ban Crestor.

> The Marketing of Super-Strong Crestor
> Crestor's introduction in August 2003 provides a textbook example of
> how marketing strategies can supersede medical science and common
> sense. Taking a page from Lipitor's highly successful marketing
> campaign in 1997, Crestor is now being aggressively marketed as the
> strongest statin of all.

> The manufacturer's recommended initial dose of Crestor is 10 mg/day
> (except for people with kidney problems). This dosage is so strong
> that Crestor's advertising can boast it is stronger than equivalent
> doses of any other statin. This is quite a claim, because Lipitor and
> Zocor are pretty strong themselves. Indeed, their top-selling status
> has been built on their own advertising about their power to reduce
> cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels.

> But more isn't necessarily better with most medications, including
> statins. As I've written in medical journal articles and in my
> upcoming book (What You Need To Know About Statin {*filter*} And Their
> Natural Alternatives),1 the standard starting doses of Lipitor and
> Zocor are often double or quadruple the amounts that millions of
> people actually need, triggering many avoidable side effects. So what
> can we say about super-strong Crestor, which is even stronger? We can
> say that the drug company-recommended, super-strong initial 10-mg dose
> of Crestor has already been linked to severe toxicities.1A This should
> not surprise anyone.

> Excessive Doses = More Side Effects
> One of my basic principles is: The best dose of any medication is the
> least amount that works. Medical science agrees. Most people with
> elevated cholesterol or LDL-C have mild-to-moderate elevations. For
> many, dietary interventions are enough. For others, modest statin
> doses are often plenty. But the recommended initial doses of Lipitor,
> Zocor, and Pravachol are strong, yet that's what doctors prescribe to
> most people, even to people who don't need such strong statin therapy.
> This is the crux of the problem of statin side effects such as muscle
> aches, joint pains, abdominal discomfort, memory and cognitive
> impairment.2-6 Side effects are a major reason that 60%-75% of people
> started on statins quit treatment.7,8 The average time until they
> discontinue treatment: 8 months. Many people quit within a few months.

> Liver injury, liver toxicity, and death are also concerns with
> statins. Like other statin side effects, these reactions are
> dose-related: the greater the dose, the greater the risk. Dr. W.C.
> Roberts, the editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Cardiology,
> warns: "With each doubling of the [statin] dose, the frequency of
> liver enzyme elevations [indicating liver irritation or injury] also
> doubles.9"

> Nerve injuries have now been documented in people taking statins
> long-term.10, 11 The incidence is low, perhaps 1 in 2000 to 5,000, but
> with millions taking statins, this adverse effect will afflict
> thousands of people each year. These injuries can be severe and
> permanent, and even mild nerve injuries can take months to fade away.

> Doctors cannot anticipate who will develop a long-term side effect
> with statins, but doctors should (but usually don't) anticipate that
> they will occur in some people. The only defense: using the least
> amount of medication you need.

> Do We Need a Stronger Statin?
> The standard starting dose of Crestor is 10 mg, which reduces LDL-C a
> whopping 46%-52%.12 Some people, especially those with serious
> coronary disease, require this degree of LDL-C reduction, but most
> people with elevated cholesterol require only 20%-30% reductions --
> and therefore much less medication.

> Crestor's manufacturer does recommend a lower 5-mg dose for people
> requiring "less aggressive LDL-C reductions.12" Yet, 5-mg Crestor
> reduces LDL-C 42%, still far more than most people with elevated
> cholesterol need.

> And remember, this 42% LDL-C reduction represents the average among
> study subjects. Many people get even greater reductions with this
> dosage. In one study, 5 mg of Crestor reduced LDL-C as much as 71% in
> subjects.13 This is an impressive number, but reducing cholesterol too
> aggressively is believed to be a trigger for cognitive, memory, and
> mood problems with statins. And too low cholesterol levels aren't good
> either, because cholesterol is a necessary building block in human
> cells and a substrate of many of our hormones.

> So contrary to Crestor's marketing, we shouldn't be overly impressed
> with which statin is strongest. You don't want the strongest statin.
> You want the mildest statin that works for you.

> Lower, Safer Doses of Crestor Work --
> But Your Doctor Doesn't Know About Them
> The lowest marketed dose of Crestor is 5 mg. Yet, studies show that
> 2.5 mg of Crestor reduces LDL-C 40%, and just 1 mg reduces LDL-C 34%,
> on average.13, 14 These doses are still stronger than the standard
> initial doses of Pravachol, Mevacor, Zocor, and Lescol, and they would
> certainly be strong enough for most people with elevated cholesterol.
> Indeed, the lead author of one Crestor study stated: "Even at 1
> mg/day, rosuvastatin [Crestor] reduced LDL-C by 35%, the same
> percentage reduction seen with simvastatin [Zocor] 20 and 40 mg.14"

> Yet, you won't find any information about this in the Crestor package
> insert,12 pharmacy slips, or the Physicians' Desk Reference.2
> Crestor's manufacturer isn't going to inform you or your doctor about
> lower Crestor doses that aren't available, even if they are effective
> -- and safer. This goes right to the heart of the issue of informed
> consent. Your right of informed consent is denied if you aren't given
> enough information to make an intelligent choice.15 You aren't alone:
> one study showed that only 9% of office patients receive enough
> information to fulfill their right of informed consent .16 No wonder
> medication side effects continue to be one of the leading causes of
> death in America.

> The Marketing of Crestor
> Why isn't Crestor marketed at lower, safer doses? Drug companies like
> to keep dosing simple, because simple dosing makes doctors' job
> easier. The fact is, doctors are inadequately trained about
> medications. Their one pharmacology course covers hundreds upon
> hundreds of {*filter*}, but not deeply. Doctors assume that drug companies
> and the FDA are providing complete information with the best doses,
> when in fact they aren't. That's why doctors rarely question
> irrational drug company guidelines even when the guidelines tell
> doctors to prescribe the same strong doses to young and old, big and
> small, healthy and frail.

> I could list hundreds of quotes about problems with drug research and
> marketing, but the following two will suffice. The first is from Dr.
> Andrew Herxheimer, the highly respected expert at Britain's renowned
> Cochrane Coalition:

> "{*filter*} are often introduced at a dose that will be effective in around
> 90% of the target population, because this helps market penetration.
> The 25% of patients who are most sensitive to the drug get much more
> than they need.17"

> Actually, with statins, the number is probably much higher. Dr. David
> Kessler, when he was FDA commissioner, wrote this about marketing
> strategies vs. medical science:

> "Pharmaceutical companies are waging aggressive campaigns to change
> prescribers' habits and to distinguish their products from competing
> ones, even when products are virtually indistinguishable. Victory in
> these therapeutic-class wars can mean millions [billions today] of
> dollars for a drug company. But for patients and providers it can mean
> misleading promotions, conflicts of interest, increased costs for
> health care, and ultimately, inappropriate prescribing.18"

> My articles and

...

read more »



Wed, 27 Dec 2006 06:44:21 GMT
 Over Dose: Jay Cohen on statins and marketing hype

Quote:

> Let me ask you a stupid question. If all Statins are the same then why do
> they make a distinction in this article? If all Statins are the same then
> why switch from one to the other? If all Statins cause damage at all levels
> then why mention dosage effects?
> You are so desperate to find negative articles of statins that you don't
> even care if it is contradictory to your own views.

> "Who actually needs Crestor? Hardly anyone. Other statins have much
> longer track records and should be used first. The respected Medical
> Letter on {*filter*} and Therapeutics agrees, recommending Crestor only for
> "non-Asian patients who have not responded adequately to statins with
> a longer record.21"
> If you are feeling bold, ask your doctor why he/she is suggesting the
> least-known, most-powerful statin that already has been linked to
> multiple toxicities, rather than better known, apparently safer other
> statins. Until we hold our own doctors accountable for their
> thoughtless decisions, nothing will change and our children will be
> subjected to the same drug-company controlled health care system."

> Good advice switch to the better known, safer statin. You better ask your
> thoughtless doctors first and check to see if they have stock in a drug
> company also. Nice!!!!!!
> Don't forget to buy his book and read about horror stories.

Dr. Joel Cohen is a highly respected authority on {*filter*} over dose. His
web site and his book Over Dose are thoughtful explorations of how
{*filter*} might be used to best advantage, of how the doses we and our
physicians have been told are necessary are not only NOT necessary but
harmful. His point of view is rational, and mature, from an academic
pharmacologist. He is not a proponent of no {*filter*} but responsible use
and marketing of {*filter*}.

Posting this article in no way implies I agree with every dot and
word, or that you have to. It is meant to spur thoughtful, reasonable
and mature discussion on a topic that is of vital importance to us
all.

Zee



Wed, 27 Dec 2006 11:57:38 GMT
 Over Dose: Jay Cohen on statins and marketing hype


Quote:
> Should doctors be required to post a sign in their office listing which
drug
> companies they own stock in?
> I know as a stockholder in various companies that stock ownership
influences
> me where I purchase  items and what brands of items I use.

Does a doctor have a right to know what stocks a patient owns? What if there
is a financial conflict of interest in which a lawsuit can be made if a drug
interaction or complicaton occurs. Should a doctor have a right to ask if
patients have ever filed a lawsuit against health care providers?
Quote:

> There are certain drug companies that exist because they sold their stock
> directly to doctors who then prescribed their products. Often the
companies
> started by selling branded copies of {*filter*} that were available as
generics.
> Their so-called branded generics were then sold to pharmacies at prices
> equal to many brand name products that were developed by basic research.

Is there something illegally implied there? If so what is it? Do you think
that the other competing drug manufacturers are going to do nothing? Is it
really that easy to start a drug company and start paying doctors to
prescribe your drug in competition with the large companies? Many doctors
use many different {*filter*} by many different companies. Many {*filter*} are not
tolerated well and quite often the first drug one starts off with is not the
one tolerated the best. Just because a doctor prescribes it doesn't mean you
will tolerate it.
Quote:

> Eventually unless the drug companies control their prices we will all be
> taking every generic drug made as the HMO's , State and Federal government
> will get tired of paying the bill. The Fed needs that money for the great
> and glorious war of the month program.

Thers's nothing wrong with generic {*filter*} and prices are controlled like any
other product on the market.

Quote:



> <snip>
> > Good advice switch to the better known, safer statin. You better ask
your
> thoughtless doctors first and check to see if they have stock in a drug
> > company also. Nice!!!!!!> Don't forget to buy his book and read about
> horror stories.



Wed, 27 Dec 2006 15:05:12 GMT
 Over Dose: Jay Cohen on statins and marketing hype

Quote:

> Trollpost

> Clue: crossposting all over the show
> Action: DO NOT FEED the troll.

The only Troll here is one who would advice ignoring a matter of vital
importance to millions of {*filter*} consumers.

"Liver injury, liver toxicity, and death are also concerns with
statins. Like other statin side effects, these reactions are
dose-related: the greater the dose, the greater the risk. Dr. W.C.
Roberts, the editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Cardiology,
warns: "With each doubling of the [statin] dose, the frequency of
liver enzyme elevations [indicating liver irritation or injury] also
doubles.9"

Nerve injuries have now been documented in people taking statins
long-term.10, 11 The incidence is low, perhaps 1 in 2000 to 5,000, but
with millions taking statins, this adverse effect will afflict
thousands of people each year. These injuries can be severe and
permanent, and even mild nerve injuries can take months to fade away.

***************************************************************

Zee

Quote:



> > "Pharmaceutical companies are waging aggressive campaigns to change
> > prescribers' habits and to distinguish their products from competing
> > ones, even when products are virtually indistinguishable. Victory in
> > these therapeutic-class wars can mean millions [billions today] of
> > dollars for a drug company. But for patients and providers it can mean
> > misleading promotions, conflicts of interest, increased costs for
> > health care, and ultimately, inappropriate prescribing.18"

> > From: http://www.***.com/

> > THE TRUTH ABOUT CRESTOR: IS CRESTOR DANGEROUS AND, IF SO, WHY? The
> > Intensive Marketing of This New, Super-Strong, Cholesterol-Lowering
> > Statin Drug Raises Questions and Concerns. Are Crestor Users in
> > Jeopardy? Is Crestor Especially Dangerous for Asians? Who Should Take
> > Crestor and When? A Lower, Safer Approach That Most Doctors and
> > Patients Don't Know About.

> > What is Crestor and What Is the Problem?

> > Crestor is the newest statin and the strongest statin yet. Statins are
> > the highly touted {*filter*} for reducing cholesterol. Studies clearly show
> > that statins improve cholesterol numbers (by lowering LDL and raising
> > HDL) and may reduce C-reactive protein. Statins impede
> > atherosclerosis, reduce heart attacks and strokes, and cardiac death.
> > Thus, the statins Lipitor and Zocor are not only the #1 and #2
> > top-selling {*filter*} in America, but also household names.

> > Other statins include Pravachol, Mevacor, and Lescol -- and now
> > ultra-potent Crestor. Until 2001, there was another statin: Baycol. It
> > was then the newest statin and a potent statin -- until it was
> > withdrawn because of dozens of deaths. Is Crestor another Lipitor or
> > another Baycol? Although Crestor has been on the market only a year,
> > it has already been linked to numerous cases of severe muscle
> > breakdown, kidney toxicity, and deaths. Public Citizen recently
> > petitioned the FDA to ban Crestor.

> > The Marketing of Super-Strong Crestor
> > Crestor's introduction in August 2003 provides a textbook example of
> > how marketing strategies can supersede medical science and common
> > sense. Taking a page from Lipitor's highly successful marketing
> > campaign in 1997, Crestor is now being aggressively marketed as the
> > strongest statin of all.

> > The manufacturer's recommended initial dose of Crestor is 10 mg/day
> > (except for people with kidney problems). This dosage is so strong
> > that Crestor's advertising can boast it is stronger than equivalent
> > doses of any other statin. This is quite a claim, because Lipitor and
> > Zocor are pretty strong themselves. Indeed, their top-selling status
> > has been built on their own advertising about their power to reduce
> > cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels.

> > But more isn't necessarily better with most medications, including
> > statins. As I've written in medical journal articles and in my
> > upcoming book (What You Need To Know About Statin {*filter*} And Their
> > Natural Alternatives),1 the standard starting doses of Lipitor and
> > Zocor are often double or quadruple the amounts that millions of
> > people actually need, triggering many avoidable side effects. So what
> > can we say about super-strong Crestor, which is even stronger? We can
> > say that the drug company-recommended, super-strong initial 10-mg dose
> > of Crestor has already been linked to severe toxicities.1A This should
> > not surprise anyone.

> > Excessive Doses = More Side Effects
> > One of my basic principles is: The best dose of any medication is the
> > least amount that works. Medical science agrees. Most people with
> > elevated cholesterol or LDL-C have mild-to-moderate elevations. For
> > many, dietary interventions are enough. For others, modest statin
> > doses are often plenty. But the recommended initial doses of Lipitor,
> > Zocor, and Pravachol are strong, yet that's what doctors prescribe to
> > most people, even to people who don't need such strong statin therapy.
> > This is the crux of the problem of statin side effects such as muscle
> > aches, joint pains, abdominal discomfort, memory and cognitive
> > impairment.2-6 Side effects are a major reason that 60%-75% of people
> > started on statins quit treatment.7,8 The average time until they
> > discontinue treatment: 8 months. Many people quit within a few months.

> > Liver injury, liver toxicity, and death are also concerns with
> > statins. Like other statin side effects, these reactions are
> > dose-related: the greater the dose, the greater the risk. Dr. W.C.
> > Roberts, the editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Cardiology,
> > warns: "With each doubling of the [statin] dose, the frequency of
> > liver enzyme elevations [indicating liver irritation or injury] also
> > doubles.9"

> > Nerve injuries have now been documented in people taking statins
> > long-term.10, 11 The incidence is low, perhaps 1 in 2000 to 5,000, but
> > with millions taking statins, this adverse effect will afflict
> > thousands of people each year. These injuries can be severe and
> > permanent, and even mild nerve injuries can take months to fade away.

> > Doctors cannot anticipate who will develop a long-term side effect
> > with statins, but doctors should (but usually don't) anticipate that
> > they will occur in some people. The only defense: using the least
> > amount of medication you need.

> > Do We Need a Stronger Statin?
> > The standard starting dose of Crestor is 10 mg, which reduces LDL-C a
> > whopping 46%-52%.12 Some people, especially those with serious
> > coronary disease, require this degree of LDL-C reduction, but most
> > people with elevated cholesterol require only 20%-30% reductions --
> > and therefore much less medication.

> > Crestor's manufacturer does recommend a lower 5-mg dose for people
> > requiring "less aggressive LDL-C reductions.12" Yet, 5-mg Crestor
> > reduces LDL-C 42%, still far more than most people with elevated
> > cholesterol need.

> > And remember, this 42% LDL-C reduction represents the average among
> > study subjects. Many people get even greater reductions with this
> > dosage. In one study, 5 mg of Crestor reduced LDL-C as much as 71% in
> > subjects.13 This is an impressive number, but reducing cholesterol too
> > aggressively is believed to be a trigger for cognitive, memory, and
> > mood problems with statins. And too low cholesterol levels aren't good
> > either, because cholesterol is a necessary building block in human
> > cells and a substrate of many of our hormones.

> > So contrary to Crestor's marketing, we shouldn't be overly impressed
> > with which statin is strongest. You don't want the strongest statin.
> > You want the mildest statin that works for you.

> > Lower, Safer Doses of Crestor Work --
> > But Your Doctor Doesn't Know About Them
> > The lowest marketed dose of Crestor is 5 mg. Yet, studies show that
> > 2.5 mg of Crestor reduces LDL-C 40%, and just 1 mg reduces LDL-C 34%,
> > on average.13, 14 These doses are still stronger than the standard
> > initial doses of Pravachol, Mevacor, Zocor, and Lescol, and they would
> > certainly be strong enough for most people with elevated cholesterol.
> > Indeed, the lead author of one Crestor study stated: "Even at 1
> > mg/day, rosuvastatin [Crestor] reduced LDL-C by 35%, the same
> > percentage reduction seen with simvastatin [Zocor] 20 and 40 mg.14"

> > Yet, you won't find any information about this in the Crestor package
> > insert,12 pharmacy slips, or the Physicians' Desk Reference.2
> > Crestor's manufacturer isn't going to inform you or your doctor about
> > lower Crestor doses that aren't available, even if they are effective
> > -- and safer. This goes right to the heart of the issue of informed
> > consent. Your right of informed consent is denied if you aren't given
> > enough information to make an intelligent choice.15 You aren't alone:
> > one study showed that only 9% of office patients receive enough
> > information to fulfill their right of informed consent .16 No wonder
> > medication side effects continue to be one of the leading causes of
> > death in America.

> > The Marketing of Crestor
> > Why isn't Crestor marketed at lower, safer doses? Drug companies like
> > to keep dosing simple, because simple dosing makes doctors' job
> > easier. The fact is, doctors are inadequately trained about
> > medications. Their one pharmacology course covers hundreds upon
> > hundreds of {*filter*}, but not deeply. Doctors assume that drug companies
> > and the FDA are providing complete information with the best doses,
> > when in fact they

...

read more »



Thu, 28 Dec 2006 03:27:38 GMT
 Over Dose: Jay Cohen on statins and marketing hype



Quote:
> > Trollpost

> > Clue: crossposting all over the show
> > Action: DO NOT FEED the troll.

> The only Troll here is one who would advice ignoring a matter of vital
> importance to millions of {*filter*} consumers.

Your web site is not only about statins is it?
I think your agenda is clearly anti-drug at all cost to the detrement of
those in need of them. It is intended to scare people off of every single
drug out there by implying that all doctors are on the take. Having the
doctor sign anything does not decrease the drug interactions and side
effects nor the prescibing patterns of any given doctor. In short it does
nothing as it is not inforciable in court or is that your entire agenda is
money?

Quote:

> "Liver injury, liver toxicity, and death are also concerns with
> statins. Like other statin side effects, these reactions are
> dose-related: the greater the dose, the greater the risk. Dr. W.C.
> Roberts, the editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Cardiology,
> warns: "With each doubling of the [statin] dose, the frequency of
> liver enzyme elevations [indicating liver irritation or injury] also
> doubles.9"

Keep on scaring people off their medicine. Maybe your next step would be to
tell them to stop taking their insulin. Insulin deaths are pretty common not
only because of the direct effects on {*filter*} sugar coma but on what the
person is doing at the time. They can pass out on the highway and kill
somebody else as well. Maybe they should ban insulin or have the doctor sign
a statement they don't have any financial interests to the insulin
manufacturer who manufacturers many other {*filter*} as well.

Quote:

> Nerve injuries have now been documented in people taking statins
> long-term.10, 11 The incidence is low, perhaps 1 in 2000 to 5,000, but
> with millions taking statins, this adverse effect will afflict
> thousands of people each year. These injuries can be severe and
> permanent, and even mild nerve injuries can take months to fade away.

So the only solution is no longer dosage effects but if only one person gets
nerve damage at any dose then everybody should stop taking the drug.
Your message is loud and clear.

Your extreme bizarre position is like peeing into the wind. Nobody will come
close to you and for all practical purposes makes you a troll.



Thu, 28 Dec 2006 04:13:38 GMT
 Over Dose: Jay Cohen on statins and marketing hype
I understand your need to justify the fact that you are poisoning
yourself with pharmaceuticals but you are not convincing anyone else.
Why dont you give it up?  If you want to destroy your own body that is
fine but stop trying to  rationalize your self destruction and stop
trying to legitamize those doing the destroying.  Im sure it makes you
feel better and probably keeps you sane and of course missery loves
company but stop trying to doop others into joining you in self
delusion self destruction.


Thu, 28 Dec 2006 05:45:17 GMT
 Over Dose: Jay Cohen on statins and marketing hype

Quote:





> > > Trollpost

> > > Clue: crossposting all over the show
> > > Action: DO NOT FEED the troll.

> > The only Troll here is one who would advice ignoring a matter of vital
> > importance to millions of {*filter*} consumers.

> Your web site is not only about statins is it?
> I think your agenda is clearly anti-drug at all cost to the detrement of
> those in need of them. It is intended to scare people off of every single
> drug out there by implying that all doctors are on the take. Having the
> doctor sign anything does not decrease the drug interactions and side
> effects nor the prescibing patterns of any given doctor. In short it does
> nothing as it is not inforciable in court or is that your entire agenda is
> money?

> > "Liver injury, liver toxicity, and death are also concerns with
> > statins. Like other statin side effects, these reactions are
> > dose-related: the greater the dose, the greater the risk. Dr. W.C.
> > Roberts, the editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Cardiology,
> > warns: "With each doubling of the [statin] dose, the frequency of
> > liver enzyme elevations [indicating liver irritation or injury] also
> > doubles.9"

> Keep on scaring people off their medicine. Maybe your next step would be to
> tell them to stop taking their insulin. Insulin deaths are pretty common not
> only because of the direct effects on {*filter*} sugar coma but on what the
> person is doing at the time.

Interesting that you bring up insulin. For the last couple decades
diabetics have been forced to use human derived insulin, which causes
multiple problems to control {*filter*} sugar. Pig insulin was off patent
you see and there was no money to be made on it. Pharmas began
research and development of something they could patent. It's human
insulin. Pharma reps push it, people who want pig insulin again
because they are better controlled on it, and it costs pennies, can't
get it. Pharma won't make it. So diabetics suffer and die.

Stockholders share not healthcare.

As to your assertion no one will discuss the topics I start: four
threads on the topic of statins, pharma marketing and research,
combined posts over 100 in only three days.

Including several from you!

Zee



Thu, 28 Dec 2006 14:03:47 GMT
 Over Dose: Jay Cohen on statins and marketing hype


Quote:
> I understand your need to justify the fact that you are poisoning
> yourself with pharmaceuticals but you are not convincing anyone else.

Which is it? Most people as they get older eventually will be on some
chronic meds. I am the norm and you are the one needing justification to
avoid {*filter*} at all costs. I hope it works for you but keep in mind that when
you collapse and are taken to hospital then get ready to get filled with all
kinds of {*filter*}.

Quote:
> Why dont you give it up?  If you want to destroy your own body that is
> fine but stop trying to  rationalize your self destruction and stop
> trying to legitamize those doing the destroying.  Im sure it makes you
> feel better and probably keeps you sane and of course missery loves
> company but stop trying to doop others into joining you in self
> delusion self destruction.

I don't need others to join me. There are plenty rational people out there
who know better than to not take meds when they need them. I am here to warn
little children from lunatics like you.


Thu, 28 Dec 2006 15:24:43 GMT
 Over Dose: Jay Cohen on statins and marketing hype



Quote:




> > > > Trollpost

> > > > Clue: crossposting all over the show
> > > > Action: DO NOT FEED the troll.

> > > The only Troll here is one who would advice ignoring a matter of vital
> > > importance to millions of {*filter*} consumers.

> > Your web site is not only about statins is it?
> > I think your agenda is clearly anti-drug at all cost to the detrement of
> > those in need of them. It is intended to scare people off of every
single
> > drug out there by implying that all doctors are on the take. Having the
> > doctor sign anything does not decrease the drug interactions and side
> > effects nor the prescibing patterns of any given doctor. In short it
does
> > nothing as it is not inforciable in court or is that your entire agenda
is
> > money?

> > > "Liver injury, liver toxicity, and death are also concerns with
> > > statins. Like other statin side effects, these reactions are
> > > dose-related: the greater the dose, the greater the risk. Dr. W.C.
> > > Roberts, the editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Cardiology,
> > > warns: "With each doubling of the [statin] dose, the frequency of
> > > liver enzyme elevations [indicating liver irritation or injury] also
> > > doubles.9"

> > Keep on scaring people off their medicine. Maybe your next step would be
to
> > tell them to stop taking their insulin. Insulin deaths are pretty common
not
> > only because of the direct effects on {*filter*} sugar coma but on what the
> > person is doing at the time.

> Interesting that you bring up insulin. For the last couple decades
> diabetics have been forced to use human derived insulin, which causes
> multiple problems to control {*filter*} sugar. Pig insulin was off patent
> you see and there was no money to be made on it. Pharmas began
> research and development of something they could patent. It's human
> insulin. Pharma reps push it, people who want pig insulin again
> because they are better controlled on it, and it costs pennies, can't

Nobody ask'd the pigs did they?

Quote:
> get it. Pharma won't make it. So diabetics suffer and die.

Insulin is a drug remember and it must therefore be bad. It is made as you
mentioned by the pharm's and that proves that it is bad. The only drug one
can trust is one not produced by the pharm's.
Quote:

> Stockholders share not healthcare.

> As to your assertion no one will discuss the topics I start: four
> threads on the topic of statins, pharma marketing and research,
> combined posts over 100 in only three days.

> Including several from you!

> Zee

Now that I know who and what you are then it is pointless to continue.


Thu, 28 Dec 2006 15:37:28 GMT
 Over Dose: Jay Cohen on statins and marketing hype

Quote:









> > > > > Trollpost

> > > > > Clue: crossposting all over the show
> > > > > Action: DO NOT FEED the troll.

> > > > The only Troll here is one who would advice ignoring a matter of vital
> > > > importance to millions of {*filter*} consumers.

> > > Your web site is not only about statins is it?
> > > I think your agenda is clearly anti-drug at all cost to the detrement of
> > > those in need of them. It is intended to scare people off of every
>  single
> > > drug out there by implying that all doctors are on the take. Having the
> > > doctor sign anything does not decrease the drug interactions and side
> > > effects nor the prescibing patterns of any given doctor. In short it
>  does
> > > nothing as it is not inforciable in court or is that your entire agenda
>  is
> > > money?

> > > > "Liver injury, liver toxicity, and death are also concerns with
> > > > statins. Like other statin side effects, these reactions are
> > > > dose-related: the greater the dose, the greater the risk. Dr. W.C.
> > > > Roberts, the editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Cardiology,
> > > > warns: "With each doubling of the [statin] dose, the frequency of
> > > > liver enzyme elevations [indicating liver irritation or injury] also
> > > > doubles.9"

> > > Keep on scaring people off their medicine. Maybe your next step would be
>  to
> > > tell them to stop taking their insulin. Insulin deaths are pretty common
>  not
> > > only because of the direct effects on {*filter*} sugar coma but on what the
> > > person is doing at the time.

> > Interesting that you bring up insulin. For the last couple decades
> > diabetics have been forced to use human derived insulin, which causes
> > multiple problems to control {*filter*} sugar. Pig insulin was off patent
> > you see and there was no money to be made on it. Pharmas began
> > research and development of something they could patent. It's human
> > insulin. Pharma reps push it, people who want pig insulin again
> > because they are better controlled on it, and it costs pennies, can't
>  Nobody ask'd the pigs did they?
> > get it. Pharma won't make it. So diabetics suffer and die.

> Insulin is a drug remember and it must therefore be bad. It is made as you
> mentioned by the pharm's and that proves that it is bad. The only drug one
> can trust is one not produced by the pharm's.

> > Stockholders share not healthcare.

> > As to your assertion no one will discuss the topics I start: four
> > threads on the topic of statins, pharma marketing and research,
> > combined posts over 100 in only three days.

> > Including several from you!

> > Zee
> Now that I know who and what you are then it is pointless to continue.

Your responses were always pointless.

Zee



Fri, 29 Dec 2006 15:23:40 GMT
 Over Dose: Jay Cohen on statins and marketing hype

what you are then it is pointless to continue.

Quote:

> Your responses were always pointless.

> Zee

I will report you to the animal rights groups because of your insistence on
using and abusing pigs. Pigs have rights too. You want to experiment on
little animals for fun. Just as there are people dedicating their lives to
stopping the use of Statins, there are also those dedicating their lives in
the cause of protecting animals.
Did you pull the wings off of fly's as a little girl?


Sat, 30 Dec 2006 01:51:11 GMT
 
 [ 14 post ] 

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