Provera for bleeding of cervical polyps? 
Author Message
 Provera for bleeding of cervical polyps?

Sorry for the repost but I sure could use some feedback and info to take
with me as I go for a second opinion in a week and a half....I went in for
irregular bleeding and the doc discovered cervical polyps as a possible
cause. U/S ruled out fibroids and pap was normal. I am 43 and not yet
experiencing any menopausal symptoms and my {*filter*}work is normal. The doctor
wants me to try Provera for the bleeding. I can't find any references for
this use of Provera. I am also VERY prone to depression. I read all I can
find on polyps and understand that it is rather simple to remove them. Is
there ANY reason for the trial of Provera?? I told her I would rather go
ahead with the surgery, but she said it was "not allowed" without trying
medical therapy first. Does this make any sense??
Any input appreciated!
Deb



Wed, 11 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Provera for bleeding of cervical polyps?

Provera (progesterone) will cause the uterine lining to atrophy, basically
stopping any future menstruation. It could be that the polyps are being
stimulated just like the lining of the uterus to bleed cyclically. As for it
not being an indicated use for Provera, their must be some clinical evidence in
the medical literature to support this. Try a medline search.
Also, the reason for trying the provera first before surgery is probably a
Medical Insurance cost-saving issue, try the cheapest thing first!
Note - the Provera will throw you into a pseudomenopause, complete with all the
symptoms of  natural menopause - hot flashes, etc.

Good luck

Duane

Quote:

> Sorry for the repost but I sure could use some feedback and info to take
> with me as I go for a second opinion in a week and a half....I went in for
> irregular bleeding and the doc discovered cervical polyps as a possible
> cause. U/S ruled out fibroids and pap was normal. I am 43 and not yet
> experiencing any menopausal symptoms and my {*filter*}work is normal. The doctor
> wants me to try Provera for the bleeding. I can't find any references for
> this use of Provera. I am also VERY prone to depression. I read all I can
> find on polyps and understand that it is rather simple to remove them. Is
> there ANY reason for the trial of Provera?? I told her I would rather go
> ahead with the surgery, but she said it was "not allowed" without trying
> medical therapy first. Does this make any sense??
> Any input appreciated!
> Deb



Wed, 11 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Provera for bleeding of cervical polyps?

Quote:

> Sorry for the repost but I sure could use some feedback and info to
> take
> with me as I go for a second opinion in a week and a half....I went in
> for
> irregular bleeding and the doc discovered cervical polyps as a
> possible
> cause. U/S ruled out fibroids and pap was normal. I am 43 and not yet
> experiencing any menopausal symptoms and my {*filter*}work is normal.

There's no such thing as normal {*filter*}work at thius point in our lives.
Hormone levels change from minute to minute and all the {*filter*}work tells
your doctor is that at that particular moment your hormone levels were
within normal limits. My advice would be to insist on the surgery to
remove the polyps unless the doctor can come up with specific cites that
you can research showing that provera is indicated in the case of
bleeding polyps. Tell him/her that you have found nothing despite
diligent searching and that no one you have asked for info has been able
to find anything showing that this is an indicated procedure. If worst
comes to worst, (I think you said the bleeding was slight and only a bit
annoying?), accept the prescription, don't take the pills and after the
requisite time has elapsed present him/her with unchanged symptoms. I'm
going over to medline now to see if I can find anything on using Provera
this way. Will report back later, if you like. BTW do NOT allow your
doctor to use injectible depo- provera, no matter what. If you have a
bad reaction you'll just have to wait it out and it can take 2-3 months
to get the stuff out of your system. I'll let you know if i find
anything.

Terri
posted and emailed

Quote:
> The doctor
> wants me to try Provera for the bleeding. I can't find any references
> for
> this use of Provera. I am also VERY prone to depression. I read all I
> can
> find on polyps and understand that it is rather simple to remove them.
> Is
> there ANY reason for the trial of Provera?? I told her I would rather
> go
> ahead with the surgery, but she said it was "not allowed" without
> trying
> medical therapy first. Does this make any sense??
> Any input appreciated!
> Deb



Wed, 11 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Provera for bleeding of cervical polyps?

Quote:


> > Sorry for the repost but I sure could use some feedback and info to
> > take
> > with me as I go for a second opinion in a week and a half....I went
> in
> > for
> > irregular bleeding and the doc discovered cervical polyps as a
> > possible
> > cause. U/S ruled out fibroids and pap was normal. I am 43 and not
> yet
> > experiencing any menopausal symptoms and my {*filter*}work is normal.

> There's no such thing as normal {*filter*}work at thius point in our lives.

> Hormone levels change from minute to minute and all the {*filter*}work
> tells
> your doctor is that at that particular moment your hormone levels were

> within normal limits. My advice would be to insist on the surgery to
> remove the polyps unless the doctor can come up with specific cites
> that
> you can research showing that provera is indicated in the case of
> bleeding polyps. Tell him/her that you have found nothing despite
> diligent searching and that no one you have asked for info has been
> able
> to find anything showing that this is an indicated procedure. If worst

> comes to worst, (I think you said the bleeding was slight and only a
> bit
> annoying?), accept the prescription, don't take the pills and after
> the
> requisite time has elapsed present him/her with unchanged symptoms.
> I'm
> going over to medline now to see if I can find anything on using
> Provera
> this way. Will report back later, if you like. BTW do NOT allow your
> doctor to use injectible depo- provera, no matter what. If you have a
> bad reaction you'll just have to wait it out and it can take 2-3
> months
> to get the stuff out of your system. I'll let you know if i find
> anything.

> Terri
> posted and emailed

> > The doctor
> > wants me to try Provera for the bleeding. I can't find any
> references
> > for
> > this use of Provera. I am also VERY prone to depression. I read all
> I
> > can
> > find on polyps and understand that it is rather simple to remove
> them.
> > Is
> > there ANY reason for the trial of Provera?? I told her I would
> rather
> > go
> > ahead with the surgery, but she said it was "not allowed" without
> > trying
> > medical therapy first. Does this make any sense??

Okay, it seems that provera is used a diagnostic tool. If the provera
doesn't stop the bleeding after a trial of several months then your
doctor is allowed to look further to treat what you say is already clear
- bleeding polyps. Maybe he/she is misunderstanding or generalizing from
the wrong guidelines? If bleeding polyps are visisble and you say they
are, why would there be any need to use provera to diagnose the cause of
dysfunctional bleeding.

Terri

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> > Any input appreciated!
> > Deb



Wed, 11 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Provera for bleeding of cervical polyps?


Quote:

> > There's no such thing as normal {*filter*}work at thius point in our lives.
> > Hormone levels change from minute to minute and all the {*filter*}work tells
>   ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

> Now, I thought shelly said this was a myth? I'm confused. (I wondered
> why she said this, but I thought I must have missed some crucial
> information along the way.)

        This is mixing apples and oranges, I think.

        I said that the image of "wild, out of control, raging" hormones
is a myth when it has been objectively studied. Hormones -flucuate- but
the image of a woman being a "victim" of her out of control hormones seems
to play into the hands of those who choose that state of existence for
what ever purposes they need to use this excuse for their lives.

        The "hormone" {*filter*} tests are more than worthless primarily
because there are no standards for what is "normal." And I believe it is
the FSH level test that is what is so notoriously unreliable. Has the FSH
level, "wild and out of control" as it may be, ever been implicated in
victimizing the lives of meno women?  This I do not know.

        But there is a ready acceptance among many that estrogen and
progesterone go out of control at meno and are to be cursed for all of our
problems and that they need to be "balanced" some how, and all of our
problems would somehow go away. This is the present mythology I was
referring to.

        The only hormones ...according to the studies in the first NAMS
archives .....that got out of control during a hot flash were the stress
-fight or flight- hormones. The estrogen levels did not show any variation
at all. The measurements were taken during the time of the hot flash. Dr.
Susan Love also referred to this research on a panel discussion I
attended. She claimed that it seems to be the flucuations of hormones that
occur that lead to the somatic changes at meno, but no raging out of
control scenario, appealing as that is for some.

        And then there was that recent PMS study where hormones were
"objectively"  manipulated to see if they could trigger PMS and they found
that only -some- women were sensitive to the re-introduction of the
hormones, but that the hormones themselves were not universally
responsible for the PMS. Much still needs to be learned before there is
any factual validity to the catch-all image of women being victims of "out
of control, raging"  hormones.  I fear this can be a self-fullfilling
cosmology for the unaware.

        But yes, we are responsive to fluctuations in hormones. How could
we not be. We all had periods, did we not? I would sure say that the body
was being responsive to changes in hormone levels then. But, I do believe
it is widely accepted that it is normal to have periods.

shelly



Thu, 12 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Provera for bleeding of cervical polyps?

Yes, the polyps were seen at the pelvic exam. She was unable to grasp them
or "twist them off" but did say they were bleeding and quite likely my
problem. She did EMB, Pap and U/S...all within normal with "benign cervical
changes" and no fibroids. I suspect that the Provera is a cost saving option
as our clinic (military) has just become an HMO. She indicated that if the
Provera regulated  the bleeding, I would stay on it indefinitely. Since I
know the bleeding does not have a serious cause, I have opted to put up with
it rather than risk the side effects of the Provera. Thank you so much for
the input.
Debbie Harris



Sat, 14 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Provera for bleeding of cervical polyps?


Quote:

> Over age 43 many physicians recommend an endometrial biopsy in the office
> (could be done at same time as cerical polyp removal) before going to D&C.
> Rick Jelovsek MD
> Woman's Diagnostic {*filter*}

        We had a woman MD a while back tell us that you could detect
uterine cancer from a PAP exam ...seems there was some sort of more
invasive PAP than just the cervical smear that she was talking about. What
do you know about this?

        Needless to say the male doctor that told us you could detect
early ovarian cancer from an annual pelvic exam was a little off base, but
you hear it all on this newsgroup.  But both of these recommendation came
from MDs. (Or they said they were.)

shelly



Sat, 14 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Provera for bleeding of cervical polyps?

Quote:
> We had a woman MD a while back tell us that you could detect
>uterine cancer from a PAP exam ...seems there was some sort of more
>invasive PAP than just the cervical smear that she was talking about. What
>do you know about this?

Could she be talking about the EMB? (endometrial biopsy) Mine was done at
the same time as the PAP. A little scrub brush looking thing is inserted
into the cervix and cells are scraped away from inside the uterus and put on
a slide just like the scrapings from the cervix. It is a check for cancer on
the uterine lining.
Debbie


Sat, 14 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Provera for bleeding of cervical polyps?

Quote:

> > We had a woman MD a while back tell us that you could detect
> >uterine cancer from a PAP exam ...seems there was some sort of more
> >invasive PAP than just the cervical smear that she was talking about. What
> >do you know about this?

> Could she be talking about the EMB? (endometrial biopsy) Mine was done at
> the same time as the PAP. A little scrub brush looking thing is inserted
> into the cervix and cells are scraped away from inside the uterus and put on
> a slide just like the scrapings from the cervix. It is a check for cancer on
> the uterine lining.
> Debbie

Hi Deb: that's what I had done as a supposedly "regular" pap smear last
year, and the year before that (the previous year I'd had an
"old-fashioned" q-tip type one done).  The brush *hurts* me, but it
apparently gives a better sample of cervical (ouch) tissue).  RuthJ


Sat, 14 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Provera for bleeding of cervical polyps?

Hi Ruth,
I have a very *high* theshold for pain, but I found the EMB to be extremely
painful. Thankfully, the doctor warned me ahead of time that it was quite
painful, but it caused my favorite curse word to fly out of my mouth!
Yikes!! I sure hope that is not to be part of a regular PAP or I will not be
having them very often :-) The doctor did explain that it can often prevent
the necessity of a D&C for diagnostic purposes.
Debbie



Sat, 14 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Provera for bleeding of cervical polyps?

Quote:

> Hi Ruth,
> I have a very *high* theshold for pain, but I found the EMB to be extremely
> painful. Thankfully, the doctor warned me ahead of time that it was quite
> painful, but it caused my favorite curse word to fly out of my mouth!
> Yikes!! I sure hope that is not to be part of a regular PAP or I will not be
> having them very often :-) The doctor did explain that it can often prevent
> the necessity of a D&C for diagnostic purposes.
> Debbie

Hi Deb: no, an endometrial biopsy is something different, or at least it
was when one was recommended by my then-nurse practitioner 3 years ago
when I started spotting between periods (that stopped very quickly).
When I saw the instruments she planned to use I freaked out!  (And did
not have it done).  I would imagine they have improved the procedure now
to be less invasive.  Just as I am very drug sensitive, I have virtually
no threshhold for pain, something I recently read somewhere, probably in
a headache newsletter, that people who get migraines have less tolerance
for pain.  I have one today, which is subsiding.  I guess that means a
period's somewhere in the neighborhood (day 32...)  RuthJ


Sun, 15 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Provera for bleeding of cervical polyps?


Quote:

>> Hi Ruth,
>> I have a very *high* theshold for pain, but I found the EMB to be
extremely
>> painful. Thankfully, the doctor warned me ahead of time that it was quite
>> painful, but it caused my favorite curse word to fly out of my mouth!
>> Yikes!! I sure hope that is not to be part of a regular PAP or I will not
be
>> having them very often :-) The doctor did explain that it can often
prevent
>> the necessity of a D&C for diagnostic purposes.
>> Debbie

>Hi Deb: no, an endometrial biopsy is something different, or at least it
>was when one was recommended by my then-nurse practitioner 3 years ago
>when I started spotting between periods (that stopped very quickly).
>When I saw the instruments she planned to use I freaked out!  (And did
>not have it done).  I would imagine they have improved the procedure now
>to be less invasive.  Just as I am very drug sensitive, I have virtually
>no threshhold for pain, something I recently read somewhere, probably in
>a headache newsletter, that people who get migraines have less tolerance
>for pain.  I have one today, which is subsiding.  I guess that means a
>period's somewhere in the neighborhood (day 32...)  RuthJ

Not to deny anyone else's experience, but the only endometrial biopsy I've
had done was not really painful for me - though I did
get some period-pain-like cramps after. The Dr said something to the effect
of "this may be a little uncomfortable", which usually
means it will hurt like hell. I'm not generally a stoic and I do get
migraines. Does it depend on how it's done, I wonder ?
Kate

PS Ruth, surely you shouldn't be on a computer if you have a migraine ?
Doesn't the flickering of the screen make things worse ?



Sun, 15 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Provera for bleeding of cervical polyps?

I had an endometrial biopsy done 15 years ago
to help diagnose mid-cycle bleeding. I found it
very painful, but it was at a tense time in my
life. I would hope techniques have improved.
At the time, I swore I would never have another.
So far, never needed to test that resolve...

Linda, now 45



Sun, 15 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 
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