FDA getting desperate 
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 FDA getting desperate

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FDA ponders leeches, maggots, old remedies making a comeback
Gardiner Harris, New York Times

Thursday, August 25, 2005

Washington -- Flesh-eating maggots and {*filter*}sucking leeches were once
the tools of medieval doctors and shamans. But they have experienced a
quiet renaissance among high-tech surgeons, and for two days beginning
today, a federal advisory board will discuss how to regulate them.

Leeches, it turns out, are particularly good at draining excess {*filter*}
from surgically reattached or transplanted appendages. As microsurgeons
tackle feats like reattaching hands, scalps and even faces, leeches
have become indispensable.

Maggots clean festering wounds that fail to heal, as happens among
diabetics, better than almost anything in use, although the use of
maggots in the United States has been slight, in part because of
squeamishness.

But neither leeches nor maggots, despite their long histories of use,
have ever been subject to thorough regulation by the cooking.net">food and Drug
Administration. So the medical advisers are being asked to create
general guidelines about how they should be safely grown, transported
and sold.

The meeting could be one of the last of its kind.

Since 1976, the agency has required that makers of medical devices
prove that their products are safe and effective. Those already on the
market had to prove their worth; those invented later had to get
approval before marketing.

But there are unexplored corners of the nation's medical market -- no
one knows how many, but they are certainly a vanishing few -- in which
doctors and manufacturers have been doing business since well before
1976 without much notice from the FDA. The making of maggots, leeches
and bone wax, another oddity being discussed, is one of those corners.
Bone wax -- made from beeswax, olive oil and phenol -- is commonly used
by surgeons to stop bones from bleeding or reknitting.

Officials first had to decide which part of the agency had oversight --
its biological or device division, said Mark Melkerson, acting director
of the FDA's division of general, restorative and neurological devices.

"The primary mode of action for maggots is chewing," Melkerson
explained. "For leeches, it's the eating of {*filter*}. Those are mechanical
processes." Thus, the agency decided that maggots and leeches were
devices, he said.

For centuries, physicians used leeches in the mistaken view that they
would help balance a patient's body fluids, or "humors." George
Washington is said to have died after physicians used leeches to drain
him of quarts of {*filter*} during an illness. With the development of
modern medicine, leeches fell out of favor.

But in the 1970s, leeches again became popular, this time with
microsurgeons.

When reattaching or transplanting an appendage, these surgeons are
often able to stitch together arteries, which deliver {*filter*} to the
appendage and are thick-walled and relatively easy to suture. Far
harder is finding and attaching veins, which collect {*filter*} for exit and
are smaller and more fragile.

With few veins connected, {*filter*} tends to engorge the new attachment
after surgery, clot, turn blue and -- in the worst cases -- kill it,
said Dr. L. Scott Levin, a Duke University hand surgeon. To buy time
for the body to create its own venous attachments, surgeons use
leeches.

Leeches inject victims with a potent chemical{*filter*}tail that includes an
anticoagulant, an anesthetic, an antibiotic and a chemical that dilates
{*filter*} vessels. This{*filter*}tail encourages fast bleeding to empty the
appendage of extra {*filter*}, reducing pressure and allowing veins to form
on their own.

In 20 minutes, a leech is usually engorged and removed. Bleeding from
the wound may continue for up to 24 hours. If an appendage is large,
several leeches are sometimes used at once, said Levin.

"I'll use one to three leeches every couple of hours," Levin said.

As for maggots, they are unparalleled in their ability to clean
festering, gangrenous wounds. For diabetics and others whose wounds
fail to heal, maggots -- pressed into dying flesh -- can save a limb
and speed healing.

Primitive tribes from Australia, the Hill Peoples of Northern Burma and
the Mayans of Central America were known to use maggots to clean
wounds. Napoleon's surgeon in chief noted their effects. During World
War I, a physician described seeing two soldiers who had been left
wounded on the battlefield for days. When they took off their clothes,
thousands of maggots were found in their wounds. Once the maggots were
removed, the physician was astonished to find clean, pink, living
flesh. This doctor, William Baer of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine,
became maggots' modern medical champion.

***

Their oversight of cooking.net">food and {*filter*} has led us to a state where obesity
and disease is becoming overwelming and all they can come up with is
this kind of BS.

TC



Tue, 12 Feb 2008 00:44:18 GMT
 FDA getting desperate
One of the biggest problems in the making of "medicine" today is the
focus on inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism (for example, COX-2
inhibitors and allergy medication aimed at blocking the formation of
certain kinds of LTs).  This will always fail, though temporary
"benefits" are always possible, and often mostly psychological.  The
reason is that arachidonic acid is so unstable and dangerous (and I've
cited scientific papers here that are right on point on this issue)
that blocking one pathway only leads to another one, though the
"disease" can be changed in some cases (sometimes to a more dangerous
condition).  It's like a dam that is falling apart - you can plug a
hole, but the problem is that it's not strong enough to hold the water
for more than a short while.  Arachidonic acid is much too powerful for
the human body to handle, except for trace amounts.  When you eat too
much omega 6 PUFAs (usually in the form of linoleic acid, which oils
such as safflower are very high in), you force your body to make the
arachidonic acid.  "Alternative remedies" often attempt to do the same
thing that the medication does, but again, the problem is not that your
body just "gets sick" for no reason, but that it is a condition of
arachidonic acid overload, which is made even worse by iron overload,
vitamin/mineral deficiencies, etc.  But because Holman and a few others
kept pushing the ludicrous notion of "essential fatty acids" and then
the seed oil industry caught wind of it (so that now they sell the
stuff for much more than they used to as "supplements"), things are
worse than they have ever been, which is why you hear reports of all
the "epidemics" of "chronic disease."  The rise of these "epidemics"
coincides perfectly with the rise in highly polyunsaturated foods and
the drop in the consumption of highly unsaturated foods (on the
mistaken notion that cholesterol causes "heart disease" when in fact
only oxidation can do that, and saturated fatty acids actually resist
oxidation in the dangerous form - lipid peroxdiation).  Pack you body
with saturated fatty acids and don't worry about cholesterol levels -
just stay away from the dangerous foods (use butter and coconut oil as
fat sources, and don't cook cooking.net">food with cholesterol in it while exposed
to air - steaming appears to be especially bad).


Tue, 12 Feb 2008 03:41:25 GMT
 FDA getting desperate

Quote:

> Officials first had to decide which part of the agency had oversight --
> its biological or device division, said Mark Melkerson, acting director
> of the FDA's division of general, restorative and neurological devices.

> "The primary mode of action for maggots is chewing," Melkerson
> explained. "For leeches, it's the eating of {*filter*}. Those are mechanical
> processes." Thus, the agency decided that maggots and leeches were
> devices, he said.

COMMENT:

Sheesh, the FDA's reputation for incompetence remains intact, since
they didn't even get the mechanical MECHANISM right for maggots.
Maggots don't chew. They spit out digestive enzymes like spiders, than
suck up the liquid remaining. Live tissue is simply resistant to this
kind of digestion because the {*filter*} inactivates these enzymes or
carries them away.  <Sigh>.  Will the FDA EVER know WTF they're
doing???

SBH



Tue, 12 Feb 2008 03:43:51 GMT
 FDA getting desperate
If something works, go with it.

Jeff



Tue, 12 Feb 2008 05:58:32 GMT
 FDA getting desperate
So, presumably, the drug companies could develop a mix of enzymes to be
applied to wounds instead of the maggots....


Quote:


> > Officials first had to decide which part of the agency had oversight --
> > its biological or device division, said Mark Melkerson, acting director
> > of the FDA's division of general, restorative and neurological devices.

> > "The primary mode of action for maggots is chewing," Melkerson
> > explained. "For leeches, it's the eating of {*filter*}. Those are mechanical
> > processes." Thus, the agency decided that maggots and leeches were
> > devices, he said.

> COMMENT:

> Sheesh, the FDA's reputation for incompetence remains intact, since
> they didn't even get the mechanical MECHANISM right for maggots.
> Maggots don't chew. They spit out digestive enzymes like spiders, than
> suck up the liquid remaining. Live tissue is simply resistant to this
> kind of digestion because the {*filter*} inactivates these enzymes or
> carries them away.  <Sigh>.  Will the FDA EVER know WTF they're
> doing???

> SBH



Tue, 12 Feb 2008 06:03:03 GMT
 FDA getting desperate


Quote:
> If something works, go with it.

> Jeff

They have to regulate it and tax first and then the price goes up.
That's when natural health alternatives comes in and starts selling
holistically grown, mercury free, all natural maggots feed on mad cow
disease free beef in all the natural cooking.net">food stores. The price goes up again.


Tue, 12 Feb 2008 08:18:11 GMT
 FDA getting desperate

Quote:

> So, presumably, the drug companies could develop a mix of enzymes to be
> applied to wounds instead of the maggots....

Absolutely.

In 1990 you could buy GHB in any good health cooking.net">food store for about a
dollar a gram. Then it got branded a date{*filter*} drug, then outlawed and
classed with LSD and {*filter*}, then finally FDA-approved as a narcolepsy
drug. Now you can buy it in solution as "Xyrem" in the same drug class
as codeine, for 10 times the price that it once sold for. Progress!

THC is now sold in capsules for cancer patients. But it's expansive.
One day they'll genetically engineer the genes to make it in some
plant. Maybe even into a weed. Who knows what Monsanto may come up with
next? And self-igniting microturbo inhalant delivery systems for THC
are in the works, too.

Once we get all these tissue eating enzymes all cloned and made by
bacteria, we're going to need a delivery system for them, as well.
Maybe the pharm companies can build small robot delibery vehicles that
will actually crawl into a wound and squirt them where they're needed.
In the future, anything's possible.

SBH



Tue, 12 Feb 2008 08:30:54 GMT
 FDA getting desperate


Quote:



>> If something works, go with it.

>> Jeff

> They have to regulate it and tax first and then the price goes up.

Actually, the FDA doesn't tax anything.

Quote:
> That's when natural health alternatives comes in and starts selling
> holistically grown, mercury free, all natural maggots feed on mad cow
> disease free beef in all the natural cooking.net">food stores. The price goes up again.

The regulation that the FDA does ensures that {*filter*} work and are safe, and
that they are of high quality.

A large part of the price goes to pay for {*filter*}' development.

If you don't like it, don't buy {*filter*}.

Jeff



Tue, 12 Feb 2008 09:12:20 GMT
 FDA getting desperate

Quote:

> If something works, go with it.

         Or if something doesn't work, stay away from it.

         That is why since dairy (including cow's milk) products is
difficult for humans to digest, I stay away from dairy (& cow's milk)
products.   And thus I also stay away from strep throats; lung congestion;
and common colds.



Fri, 15 Feb 2008 04:15:11 GMT
 FDA getting desperate

Quote:

> If you don't like it, don't buy {*filter*}.

         Which is what I do.   I have not used a pharm drug in ten years
since I deleted dairy (& cow's milk) products from my diet.


Fri, 15 Feb 2008 04:18:15 GMT
 FDA getting desperate


Quote:

>> If you don't like it, don't buy {*filter*}.

>         Which is what I do.   I have not used a pharm drug in ten years
> since I deleted dairy (& cow's milk) products from my diet.

I stay away from conmed (conjecture based medicine, aka alternative
medicine), and I rarely get sick. And,  I drink cow milk.

This just goes to show the plural of anecdote is not data.

Jeff



Fri, 15 Feb 2008 05:07:10 GMT
 
 [ 11 post ] 

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