More truth about PsYcHiAtRy- Ritalin and cancer 
Author Message
 More truth about PsYcHiAtRy- Ritalin and cancer

Researchers Urge Caution on Ritalin-Cancer Link Finding
By Amanda Gardner
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- As the U.S. cooking.net">food and Drug
Administration moved to examine a potential link between Ritalin and
cancer, the scientists who first unearthed the connection stressed
Friday that the finding was preliminary and should not be cause for
panic.

The concerns about the drug, a stimulant that has been used to treat
attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) for decades, surfaced
during a FDA pediatrics advisory committee meeting Thursday. The
findings, by researchers from the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center at the
University of Texas, showed damage to the chromosomes of 12 children
who had taken Ritalin for three months.

The advisory committee had been called to discuss yet another health
issue surrounding the class of ADHD medications known as
methylphenidates, to which Ritalin belongs: Some psychiatric side
effects have been reported among children using Concerta, Ritalin and
other versions of these {*filter*}.

But the Texas scientists said their Ritalin study was far too small to
prompt the parents of ADHD patients to abandon the drug.

"We're not telling people to all go off their medication because you
don't know what this means," said Melissa L. Bondy, co-author of the
study, which first appeared in the Feb. 16 online issue Cancer Letters.
"You can't base changing practice on 12 patients. Look how many
millions of kids are on this. Do you want to tell all the mothers and
fathers to take their kids off of the {*filter*}?"

Bondy said she and her colleagues have submitted a grant proposal to
the National Institutes of Health for a larger study looking at more
patients and more ADHD {*filter*}.

"We definitely need a larger study," said lead researcher Dr. Randa A.
El-Zein. If approved, the study would not even be funded until March
2006.

The government interest is there, however.

Scientists from the FDA, the NIH and the Environmental Protection
Agency traveled to Texas on May 23 to examine the study methods used by
the researchers. "They thought, 'Yes, we do have a public concern,' and
that a larger study should be performed," El-Zein said.

"We're hoping that they'll see this as a major public health issue, and
as something that needs to be done," Bondy added.

Meanwhile, the question of labeling changes because of possible
psychiatric effects of Ritalin and other methylphenidates have been put
on hold after the advisory committee told FDA officials that it was
hesitant to recommend such changes.

According to an FDA release, committee members suggested waiting until
more safety data have been collected on two other types of {*filter*} used
to treat ADHD -- methamphetamines such as Adderall and the
non-stimulant Strattera, something that won't happen before early 2006.

The FDA should "delay the labeling change until they have a good sense
of class effect," Acting Committee Chairman Robert Nelson, of The
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, told FDA officials according to
the release.

"We heard there is no terrible signal," Office of Pediatric
Therapeutics Director Dianne Murphy sadded.

The FDA had been considering labeling changes to all methylphenidates
with regard to psychiatric events and potential cardiovascular side
effects. A review had found 36 psychiatric events for Concerta,
compared to 16 for Ritalin and other methylphenidates. These side
effects included hallucinations and suicide ideation. Concerta had 20
cardiovascular event reports, while the other methylphenidates had four
such reports.

Despite the committee's advice, Murphy said the agency still may change
labeling about psychiatric side effects to "try to make it clearer what
the situation is with regard to certain adverse events."

The FDA's decision to take a closer look at the psychiatric side
effects of medications for ADHD did not surprise some experts.

"These types of issues theoretically were possible with the medication
because of the way it works. It's not surprising that they've had some
reports that relate to psychiatric side effects... " said Dr. Lenard
Adler, director of the {*filter*} ADHD Program at New York University
Medical Center.

The {*filter*} have been around for 40 years, Adler added, and have a "wide
margin of safety."

"Any medicine that has therapeutic effect can have some side effects,"
Adler continued. "This is appropriate scrutiny by the FDA, but the
benefits are also very clear and clearly outweigh the risks."

Another expert believes labeling changes may not be the answer.

"Labeling is an oversimplification of the problem," said Dr. Eugenio M.
Rothe, director of the child and adolescent psychiatry clinic at
Jackson Memorial Hospital and an associate professor of psychiatry at
the University of Miami School of Medicine. "It scares people, and it
doesn't address the other problems that are affecting the outcome. The
problem is much more complex than that, and has to do primarily with
the stigma associated with mental health conditions."

This is just the latest chapter in the ongoing debate over the safety
of ADHD medications.

In February, Health Canada ordered Adderall XR off the market, after
reports of sudden cardiac death in 20 patients. The FDA, however,
elected at the time only to require the company to update Adderall's
label to warn that it should not be used in anyone with structural
cardiac abnormalities.

Almost 2 million children in the United States have been diagnosed with
ADHD, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.

More information

Visit the National Institute of Mental Health for more on ADHD.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Comments | E-Mail Newsletters | RSS

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Wed, 19 Dec 2007 07:04:11 GMT
 More truth about PsYcHiAtRy- Ritalin and cancer


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 More truth about PsYcHiAtRy- Ritalin and cancer
U.S. officials urged to speak out about ADHD {*filter*}
Thu Jun 30, 2005 11:20 PM BST
Printer Friendly | Email Article | RSS

By Lisa Richwine

ROCKVILLE, Md. (Reuters) - U.S. regulators should publicize concerns
about psychiatric problems in some children who took certain
attention-deficit {*filter*} even though officials are unsure if the
medicines caused the behavior, several members of an advisory panel
said on Thursday.

Many on the panel of outside experts agreed with cooking.net">food and Drug
Administration officials who said it was premature to update warnings
on the {*filter*}, which include Johnson & Johnson's Concerta and Novartis
AG's Ritalin and its generic competitors.

Still, the FDA should not wait to alert parents and physicians until it
reaches a firm conclusion about the potential for suicidal behavior,
aggression and other problems, several panelists said. Questions about
the group of stimulants known as methylphenidates already have received
media attention, and the uncertainty needs to be fully explained, they
said.

"Empower parents to have enough information to truly monitor their
children," said panel member Deborah Dokken.

Concern about potential psychiatric side effects arose from a routine
review of Concerta mandated by law for {*filter*} approved for children.

The FDA received 36 reports over a one-year period of children taking
Concerta who experienced aggression, agitation, abnormal behavior,
anxiety, depression, visual hallucinations or suicidal thoughts or
actions. Six{*filter*} other reports listed Ritalin and other
methylphenidates.

Those behaviors are not unexpected in patients who take stimulants, and
many disappeared when drug treatment stopped, FDA officials stressed.

"We are not seeing anything we consider particularly new, but we want
to be able to communicate it better," said Dr. Paul Andreason of the
FDA's division of neuropharmacologic drug products.

The treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD,
already come with warnings about hallucinations, abnormal thinking and
other mental problems. The medicines help tame the disease's symptoms
of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsive behavior.

Regulators asked the panel of outside experts for advice because they
said they did not want to scare parents away from effective treatments,
or prompt switches to other ADHD {*filter*} that could carry the same risk.
A review of amphetamines and Eli Lilly & Co.'s ADHD drug Strattera is
due to be completed in early 2006.

"We are struggling with not wanting to appear we are not telling
something and trying to get these adverse events completely evaluated
so we can come out and say they are all the same or they aren't," said
Dr. Dianne Murphy, director of the FDA's office of pediatric
therapeutics.

ADHD treatments are widely prescribed, and their use has been
controversial for years.

About half of all methylphenidate prescriptions over the past three
years were for Concerta. In 2004, more than 6 million Concerta
prescriptions were dispensed for patients age one to 16, the FDA
estimated.

Both Johnson & Johnson and Novartis said they would work with the FDA
as it reviewed the safety of the {*filter*}.

Quote:

> Researchers Urge Caution on Ritalin-Cancer Link Finding
> By Amanda Gardner
> HealthDay Reporter

> FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- As the U.S. cooking.net">food and Drug
> Administration moved to examine a potential link between Ritalin and
> cancer, the scientists who first unearthed the connection stressed
> Friday that the finding was preliminary and should not be cause for
> panic.

> The concerns about the drug, a stimulant that has been used to treat
> attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) for decades, surfaced
> during a FDA pediatrics advisory committee meeting Thursday. The
> findings, by researchers from the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center at the
> University of Texas, showed damage to the chromosomes of 12 children
> who had taken Ritalin for three months.

> The advisory committee had been called to discuss yet another health
> issue surrounding the class of ADHD medications known as
> methylphenidates, to which Ritalin belongs: Some psychiatric side
> effects have been reported among children using Concerta, Ritalin and
> other versions of these {*filter*}.

> But the Texas scientists said their Ritalin study was far too small to
> prompt the parents of ADHD patients to abandon the drug.

> "We're not telling people to all go off their medication because you
> don't know what this means," said Melissa L. Bondy, co-author of the
> study, which first appeared in the Feb. 16 online issue Cancer Letters.
> "You can't base changing practice on 12 patients. Look how many
> millions of kids are on this. Do you want to tell all the mothers and
> fathers to take their kids off of the {*filter*}?"

> Bondy said she and her colleagues have submitted a grant proposal to
> the National Institutes of Health for a larger study looking at more
> patients and more ADHD {*filter*}.

> "We definitely need a larger study," said lead researcher Dr. Randa A.
> El-Zein. If approved, the study would not even be funded until March
> 2006.

> The government interest is there, however.

> Scientists from the FDA, the NIH and the Environmental Protection
> Agency traveled to Texas on May 23 to examine the study methods used by
> the researchers. "They thought, 'Yes, we do have a public concern,' and
> that a larger study should be performed," El-Zein said.

> "We're hoping that they'll see this as a major public health issue, and
> as something that needs to be done," Bondy added.

> Meanwhile, the question of labeling changes because of possible
> psychiatric effects of Ritalin and other methylphenidates have been put
> on hold after the advisory committee told FDA officials that it was
> hesitant to recommend such changes.

> According to an FDA release, committee members suggested waiting until
> more safety data have been collected on two other types of {*filter*} used
> to treat ADHD -- methamphetamines such as Adderall and the
> non-stimulant Strattera, something that won't happen before early 2006.

> The FDA should "delay the labeling change until they have a good sense
> of class effect," Acting Committee Chairman Robert Nelson, of The
> Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, told FDA officials according to
> the release.

> "We heard there is no terrible signal," Office of Pediatric
> Therapeutics Director Dianne Murphy sadded.

> The FDA had been considering labeling changes to all methylphenidates
> with regard to psychiatric events and potential cardiovascular side
> effects. A review had found 36 psychiatric events for Concerta,
> compared to 16 for Ritalin and other methylphenidates. These side
> effects included hallucinations and suicide ideation. Concerta had 20
> cardiovascular event reports, while the other methylphenidates had four
> such reports.

> Despite the committee's advice, Murphy said the agency still may change
> labeling about psychiatric side effects to "try to make it clearer what
> the situation is with regard to certain adverse events."

> The FDA's decision to take a closer look at the psychiatric side
> effects of medications for ADHD did not surprise some experts.

> "These types of issues theoretically were possible with the medication
> because of the way it works. It's not surprising that they've had some
> reports that relate to psychiatric side effects... " said Dr. Lenard
> Adler, director of the {*filter*} ADHD Program at New York University
> Medical Center.

> The {*filter*} have been around for 40 years, Adler added, and have a "wide
> margin of safety."

> "Any medicine that has therapeutic effect can have some side effects,"
> Adler continued. "This is appropriate scrutiny by the FDA, but the
> benefits are also very clear and clearly outweigh the risks."

> Another expert believes labeling changes may not be the answer.

> "Labeling is an oversimplification of the problem," said Dr. Eugenio M.
> Rothe, director of the child and adolescent psychiatry clinic at
> Jackson Memorial Hospital and an associate professor of psychiatry at
> the University of Miami School of Medicine. "It scares people, and it
> doesn't address the other problems that are affecting the outcome. The
> problem is much more complex than that, and has to do primarily with
> the stigma associated with mental health conditions."

> This is just the latest chapter in the ongoing debate over the safety
> of ADHD medications.

> In February, Health Canada ordered Adderall XR off the market, after
> reports of sudden cardiac death in 20 patients. The FDA, however,
> elected at the time only to require the company to update Adderall's
> label to warn that it should not be used in anyone with structural
> cardiac abnormalities.

> Almost 2 million children in the United States have been diagnosed with
> ADHD, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.

> More information

> Visit the National Institute of Mental Health for more on ADHD.

> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

> Comments | E-Mail Newsletters | RSS

> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Wed, 19 Dec 2007 07:06:18 GMT
 More truth about PsYcHiAtRy- Ritalin and cancer
Off topic


Wed, 19 Dec 2007 07:20:29 GMT
 More truth about PsYcHiAtRy- Ritalin and cancer


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 More truth about PsYcHiAtRy- Ritalin and cancer
What does it mean when you capitalize some letters like that kathleen?

PsYcHiAtRy

Is there some secret message in there only kooks can read?

Quote:

> Researchers Urge Caution on Ritalin-Cancer Link Finding
> By Amanda Gardner
> HealthDay Reporter

> FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- As the U.S. cooking.net">food and Drug
> Administration moved to examine a potential link between Ritalin and
> cancer, the scientists who first unearthed the connection stressed
> Friday that the finding was preliminary and should not be cause for
> panic.

> The concerns about the drug, a stimulant that has been used to treat
> attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) for decades, surfaced
> during a FDA pediatrics advisory committee meeting Thursday. The
> findings, by researchers from the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center at the
> University of Texas, showed damage to the chromosomes of 12 children
> who had taken Ritalin for three months.

> The advisory committee had been called to discuss yet another health
> issue surrounding the class of ADHD medications known as
> methylphenidates, to which Ritalin belongs: Some psychiatric side
> effects have been reported among children using Concerta, Ritalin and
> other versions of these {*filter*}.

> But the Texas scientists said their Ritalin study was far too small to
> prompt the parents of ADHD patients to abandon the drug.

> "We're not telling people to all go off their medication because you
> don't know what this means," said Melissa L. Bondy, co-author of the
> study, which first appeared in the Feb. 16 online issue Cancer Letters.
> "You can't base changing practice on 12 patients. Look how many
> millions of kids are on this. Do you want to tell all the mothers and
> fathers to take their kids off of the {*filter*}?"

> Bondy said she and her colleagues have submitted a grant proposal to
> the National Institutes of Health for a larger study looking at more
> patients and more ADHD {*filter*}.

> "We definitely need a larger study," said lead researcher Dr. Randa A.
> El-Zein. If approved, the study would not even be funded until March
> 2006.

> The government interest is there, however.

> Scientists from the FDA, the NIH and the Environmental Protection
> Agency traveled to Texas on May 23 to examine the study methods used by
> the researchers. "They thought, 'Yes, we do have a public concern,' and
> that a larger study should be performed," El-Zein said.

> "We're hoping that they'll see this as a major public health issue, and
> as something that needs to be done," Bondy added.

> Meanwhile, the question of labeling changes because of possible
> psychiatric effects of Ritalin and other methylphenidates have been put
> on hold after the advisory committee told FDA officials that it was
> hesitant to recommend such changes.

> According to an FDA release, committee members suggested waiting until
> more safety data have been collected on two other types of {*filter*} used
> to treat ADHD -- methamphetamines such as Adderall and the
> non-stimulant Strattera, something that won't happen before early 2006.

> The FDA should "delay the labeling change until they have a good sense
> of class effect," Acting Committee Chairman Robert Nelson, of The
> Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, told FDA officials according to
> the release.

> "We heard there is no terrible signal," Office of Pediatric
> Therapeutics Director Dianne Murphy sadded.

> The FDA had been considering labeling changes to all methylphenidates
> with regard to psychiatric events and potential cardiovascular side
> effects. A review had found 36 psychiatric events for Concerta,
> compared to 16 for Ritalin and other methylphenidates. These side
> effects included hallucinations and suicide ideation. Concerta had 20
> cardiovascular event reports, while the other methylphenidates had four
> such reports.

> Despite the committee's advice, Murphy said the agency still may change
> labeling about psychiatric side effects to "try to make it clearer what
> the situation is with regard to certain adverse events."

> The FDA's decision to take a closer look at the psychiatric side
> effects of medications for ADHD did not surprise some experts.

> "These types of issues theoretically were possible with the medication
> because of the way it works. It's not surprising that they've had some
> reports that relate to psychiatric side effects... " said Dr. Lenard
> Adler, director of the {*filter*} ADHD Program at New York University
> Medical Center.

> The {*filter*} have been around for 40 years, Adler added, and have a "wide
> margin of safety."

> "Any medicine that has therapeutic effect can have some side effects,"
> Adler continued. "This is appropriate scrutiny by the FDA, but the
> benefits are also very clear and clearly outweigh the risks."

> Another expert believes labeling changes may not be the answer.

> "Labeling is an oversimplification of the problem," said Dr. Eugenio M.
> Rothe, director of the child and adolescent psychiatry clinic at
> Jackson Memorial Hospital and an associate professor of psychiatry at
> the University of Miami School of Medicine. "It scares people, and it
> doesn't address the other problems that are affecting the outcome. The
> problem is much more complex than that, and has to do primarily with
> the stigma associated with mental health conditions."

> This is just the latest chapter in the ongoing debate over the safety
> of ADHD medications.

> In February, Health Canada ordered Adderall XR off the market, after
> reports of sudden cardiac death in 20 patients. The FDA, however,
> elected at the time only to require the company to update Adderall's
> label to warn that it should not be used in anyone with structural
> cardiac abnormalities.

> Almost 2 million children in the United States have been diagnosed with
> ADHD, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.

> More information

> Visit the National Institute of Mental Health for more on ADHD.

> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

> Comments | E-Mail Newsletters | RSS

> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Wed, 19 Dec 2007 20:08:50 GMT
 More truth about PsYcHiAtRy- Ritalin and cancer
What does it mean when you capitalize some letters like that kathleen?

PsYcHiAtRy

Is there some secret message in there only kooks can read?

And what was your diagnosis by the real doctors when they took you from
prison and sent you to the mental ward?

Tell the truth.

Not the diagnosis you gave yourself, the one the doctors gave you?

What were the criminal charges against you?

Since you keep saying youve been proven innocent, tell us what appeals
court overturned ypur convictions?

Hows the Rico suit going? Did you get the defendants served or has the
judge dismissed it already?

Tell the truth for a change.

Quote:

> Researchers Urge Caution on Ritalin-Cancer Link Finding
> By Amanda Gardner
> HealthDay Reporter

> FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- As the U.S. cooking.net">food and Drug
> Administration moved to examine a potential link between Ritalin and
> cancer, the scientists who first unearthed the connection stressed
> Friday that the finding was preliminary and should not be cause for
> panic.

> The concerns about the drug, a stimulant that has been used to treat
> attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) for decades, surfaced
> during a FDA pediatrics advisory committee meeting Thursday. The
> findings, by researchers from the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center at the
> University of Texas, showed damage to the chromosomes of 12 children
> who had taken Ritalin for three months.

> The advisory committee had been called to discuss yet another health
> issue surrounding the class of ADHD medications known as
> methylphenidates, to which Ritalin belongs: Some psychiatric side
> effects have been reported among children using Concerta, Ritalin and
> other versions of these {*filter*}.

> But the Texas scientists said their Ritalin study was far too small to
> prompt the parents of ADHD patients to abandon the drug.

> "We're not telling people to all go off their medication because you
> don't know what this means," said Melissa L. Bondy, co-author of the
> study, which first appeared in the Feb. 16 online issue Cancer Letters.
> "You can't base changing practice on 12 patients. Look how many
> millions of kids are on this. Do you want to tell all the mothers and
> fathers to take their kids off of the {*filter*}?"

> Bondy said she and her colleagues have submitted a grant proposal to
> the National Institutes of Health for a larger study looking at more
> patients and more ADHD {*filter*}.

> "We definitely need a larger study," said lead researcher Dr. Randa A.
> El-Zein. If approved, the study would not even be funded until March
> 2006.

> The government interest is there, however.

> Scientists from the FDA, the NIH and the Environmental Protection
> Agency traveled to Texas on May 23 to examine the study methods used by
> the researchers. "They thought, 'Yes, we do have a public concern,' and
> that a larger study should be performed," El-Zein said.

> "We're hoping that they'll see this as a major public health issue, and
> as something that needs to be done," Bondy added.

> Meanwhile, the question of labeling changes because of possible
> psychiatric effects of Ritalin and other methylphenidates have been put
> on hold after the advisory committee told FDA officials that it was
> hesitant to recommend such changes.

> According to an FDA release, committee members suggested waiting until
> more safety data have been collected on two other types of {*filter*} used
> to treat ADHD -- methamphetamines such as Adderall and the
> non-stimulant Strattera, something that won't happen before early 2006.

> The FDA should "delay the labeling change until they have a good sense
> of class effect," Acting Committee Chairman Robert Nelson, of The
> Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, told FDA officials according to
> the release.

> "We heard there is no terrible signal," Office of Pediatric
> Therapeutics Director Dianne Murphy sadded.

> The FDA had been considering labeling changes to all methylphenidates
> with regard to psychiatric events and potential cardiovascular side
> effects. A review had found 36 psychiatric events for Concerta,
> compared to 16 for Ritalin and other methylphenidates. These side
> effects included hallucinations and suicide ideation. Concerta had 20
> cardiovascular event reports, while the other methylphenidates had four
> such reports.

> Despite the committee's advice, Murphy said the agency still may change
> labeling about psychiatric side effects to "try to make it clearer what
> the situation is with regard to certain adverse events."

> The FDA's decision to take a closer look at the psychiatric side
> effects of medications for ADHD did not surprise some experts.

> "These types of issues theoretically were possible with the medication
> because of the way it works. It's not surprising that they've had some
> reports that relate to psychiatric side effects... " said Dr. Lenard
> Adler, director of the {*filter*} ADHD Program at New York University
> Medical Center.

> The {*filter*} have been around for 40 years, Adler added, and have a "wide
> margin of safety."

> "Any medicine that has therapeutic effect can have some side effects,"
> Adler continued. "This is appropriate scrutiny by the FDA, but the
> benefits are also very clear and clearly outweigh the risks."

> Another expert believes labeling changes may not be the answer.

> "Labeling is an oversimplification of the problem," said Dr. Eugenio M.
> Rothe, director of the child and adolescent psychiatry clinic at
> Jackson Memorial Hospital and an associate professor of psychiatry at
> the University of Miami School of Medicine. "It scares people, and it
> doesn't address the other problems that are affecting the outcome. The
> problem is much more complex than that, and has to do primarily with
> the stigma associated with mental health conditions."

> This is just the latest chapter in the ongoing debate over the safety
> of ADHD medications.

> In February, Health Canada ordered Adderall XR off the market, after
> reports of sudden cardiac death in 20 patients. The FDA, however,
> elected at the time only to require the company to update Adderall's
> label to warn that it should not be used in anyone with structural
> cardiac abnormalities.

> Almost 2 million children in the United States have been diagnosed with
> ADHD, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.

> More information

> Visit the National Institute of Mental Health for more on ADHD.

> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

> Comments | E-Mail Newsletters | RSS

> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Wed, 19 Dec 2007 20:12:51 GMT
 More truth about PsYcHiAtRy- Ritalin and cancer


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 More truth about PsYcHiAtRy- Ritalin and cancer
Quote:

> What does it mean when you capitalize some letters like that kathleen?

> PsYcHiAtRy

> Is there some secret message in there only kooks can read?

> And what was your diagnosis by the real doctors when they took you from
> prison and sent you to the mental ward?

> Tell the truth.

> Not the diagnosis you gave yourself, the one the doctors gave you?

> What were the criminal charges against you?

> Since you keep saying youve been proven innocent, tell us what appeals
> court overturned ypur convictions?

> Hows the Rico suit going? Did you get the defendants served or has the
> judge dismissed it already?

> Tell the truth for a change.


> > Researchers Urge Caution on Ritalin-Cancer Link Finding
> > By Amanda Gardner
> > HealthDay Reporter

> > FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- As the U.S. cooking.net">food and Drug
> > Administration moved to examine a potential link between Ritalin and
> > cancer, the scientists who first unearthed the connection stressed
> > Friday that the finding was preliminary and should not be cause for
> > panic.

> > The concerns about the drug, a stimulant that has been used to treat
> > attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) for decades, surfaced
> > during a FDA pediatrics advisory committee meeting Thursday. The
> > findings, by researchers from the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center at the
> > University of Texas, showed damage to the chromosomes of 12 children
> > who had taken Ritalin for three months.

> > The advisory committee had been called to discuss yet another health
> > issue surrounding the class of ADHD medications known as
> > methylphenidates, to which Ritalin belongs: Some psychiatric side
> > effects have been reported among children using Concerta, Ritalin and
> > other versions of these {*filter*}.

> > But the Texas scientists said their Ritalin study was far too small to
> > prompt the parents of ADHD patients to abandon the drug.

> > "We're not telling people to all go off their medication because you
> > don't know what this means," said Melissa L. Bondy, co-author of the
> > study, which first appeared in the Feb. 16 online issue Cancer Letters.
> > "You can't base changing practice on 12 patients. Look how many
> > millions of kids are on this. Do you want to tell all the mothers and
> > fathers to take their kids off of the {*filter*}?"

> > Bondy said she and her colleagues have submitted a grant proposal to
> > the National Institutes of Health for a larger study looking at more
> > patients and more ADHD {*filter*}.

> > "We definitely need a larger study," said lead researcher Dr. Randa A.
> > El-Zein. If approved, the study would not even be funded until March
> > 2006.

> > The government interest is there, however.

> > Scientists from the FDA, the NIH and the Environmental Protection
> > Agency traveled to Texas on May 23 to examine the study methods used by
> > the researchers. "They thought, 'Yes, we do have a public concern,' and
> > that a larger study should be performed," El-Zein said.

> > "We're hoping that they'll see this as a major public health issue, and
> > as something that needs to be done," Bondy added.

> > Meanwhile, the question of labeling changes because of possible
> > psychiatric effects of Ritalin and other methylphenidates have been put
> > on hold after the advisory committee told FDA officials that it was
> > hesitant to recommend such changes.

> > According to an FDA release, committee members suggested waiting until
> > more safety data have been collected on two other types of {*filter*} used
> > to treat ADHD -- methamphetamines such as Adderall and the
> > non-stimulant Strattera, something that won't happen before early 2006.

> > The FDA should "delay the labeling change until they have a good sense
> > of class effect," Acting Committee Chairman Robert Nelson, of The
> > Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, told FDA officials according to
> > the release.

> > "We heard there is no terrible signal," Office of Pediatric
> > Therapeutics Director Dianne Murphy sadded.

> > The FDA had been considering labeling changes to all methylphenidates
> > with regard to psychiatric events and potential cardiovascular side
> > effects. A review had found 36 psychiatric events for Concerta,
> > compared to 16 for Ritalin and other methylphenidates. These side
> > effects included hallucinations and suicide ideation. Concerta had 20
> > cardiovascular event reports, while the other methylphenidates had four
> > such reports.

> > Despite the committee's advice, Murphy said the agency still may change
> > labeling about psychiatric side effects to "try to make it clearer what
> > the situation is with regard to certain adverse events."

> > The FDA's decision to take a closer look at the psychiatric side
> > effects of medications for ADHD did not surprise some experts.

> > "These types of issues theoretically were possible with the medication
> > because of the way it works. It's not surprising that they've had some
> > reports that relate to psychiatric side effects... " said Dr. Lenard
> > Adler, director of the {*filter*} ADHD Program at New York University
> > Medical Center.

> > The {*filter*} have been around for 40 years, Adler added, and have a "wide
> > margin of safety."

> > "Any medicine that has therapeutic effect can have some side effects,"
> > Adler continued. "This is appropriate scrutiny by the FDA, but the
> > benefits are also very clear and clearly outweigh the risks."

> > Another expert believes labeling changes may not be the answer.

> > "Labeling is an oversimplification of the problem," said Dr. Eugenio M.
> > Rothe, director of the child and adolescent psychiatry clinic at
> > Jackson Memorial Hospital and an associate professor of psychiatry at
> > the University of Miami School of Medicine. "It scares people, and it
> > doesn't address the other problems that are affecting the outcome. The
> > problem is much more complex than that, and has to do primarily with
> > the stigma associated with mental health conditions."

> > This is just the latest chapter in the ongoing debate over the safety
> > of ADHD medications.

> > In February, Health Canada ordered Adderall XR off the market, after
> > reports of sudden cardiac death in 20 patients. The FDA, however,
> > elected at the time only to require the company to update Adderall's
> > label to warn that it should not be used in anyone with structural
> > cardiac abnormalities.

> > Almost 2 million children in the United States have been diagnosed with
> > ADHD, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.

> > More information

> > Visit the National Institute of Mental Health for more on ADHD.

> > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

> > Comments | E-Mail Newsletters | RSS

> > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Thu, 20 Dec 2007 23:50:05 GMT
 
 [ 9 post ] 

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