NYT on "Foreign Corrupt Practices" (incorrect) 
Author Message
 NYT on "Foreign Corrupt Practices" (incorrect)

































Subject: NYT on "Foreign Corrupt Practices" (incorrect)

Date: Aug 14, 2010 4:59 AM

ARTICLE BELOW
=======================================

Well, "Lyme Disease" is clearly False
Claims and RICO.
Allen Steere (CDC officer) made the false
claim with scientific fraud in Europe
alone:
http://www.***.com/
with the bogus "high-passage" strains and
recombinant OspA-B with NO LIPID ATTACHED
(not likely to produce antibodies without
the lipid moeities attached).

And, as I told the FDA Vaccine committee,
no one among the *invited* labs (to the
Dearborn conference) agreed with Steere's
crazy proposal:
http://www.***.com/

- -
http://www.***.com/
"The Act establishes liability when any person or entity improperly
receives from or avoids payment to the Federal governmenttax fraud
excepted. In summary, the Act prohibits:

1. Knowingly presenting, or causing to be presented a false claim for
payment or approval;
2. Knowingly making, using, or causing to be made or used, a false
record or statement material to a false or fraudulent claim;
3. Conspiring to commit any violation of the False Claims Act;
4. Falsely certifying the type or amount of property to be used by the
Government;
5. Certifying receipt of property on a document without completely
knowing that the information is true;
6. Knowingly buying Government property from an unauthorized officer
of the Government, and;
7. Knowingly making, using, or causing to be made or used a false
record to avoid, or decrease an obligation to pay or transmit property
to the Government.
- - -

The Lyme crymes are easier to prosecute
under False Claims and RICO, although the
Yale-UConn PEDIATRIC CRIMINAL LYME TRIAL took
place in the Czech Republic:
http://www.***.com/

And why is Lyme RICO?
Because only Imugen and Yale's L2 Diagnostics
were partnered with Corixa to use the RICO
method.  This is in evidence in the US Attorney's
orifice in New Haven, CT, but since the filing of
the RICO complaint, Corixa was purchased by SmithKline:
http://www.***.com/

Either this NYT article is wrong or the FBI is lying
because the FBI and the USDOJ has heard from me at
least 200,000 times:
http://www.***.com/

They never follow up on anything.

Think about it:  They're cops.  Cops are even
more stupid, paranoid, arrogant and unable to
think outside the box than lawyers.  They're
as pitifully dense as an {*filter*}.  It's the
same *DISORDER* of the *mind* to think you're
better than everyone else and therefore don't
have to think.

KMDickson
http://www.***.com/
http://www.***.com/
=========================================================================================
http://www.***.com/

August 13, 2010
U.S. Inquiry of Drug Makers Is Widened
By GARDINER HARRIS and NATASHA SINGER

At least a dozen major drug and device makers are under investigation
by federal prosecutors and securities regulators in a broadening
{*filter*} inquiry into whether the companies made illegal payments to
doctors and health officials in foreign countries.

In previous investigations, federal officials have charged that some
companies made these kinds of payments to encourage doctors abroad to
order or prescribe their products. In the United States, companies
routinely hire doctors as consultants to market {*filter*} and devices to
their colleagues and other health professionals at medical conventions
and small gatherings. Such consulting arrangements are legal in the
United States as long as the companies do not pay doctors directly to
write prescriptions for their products.

But in much of the rest of the world, doctors are government
employees. And even consulting arrangements that would be considered
routine in the United States might violate the Foreign Corrupt
Practices Act, particularly if the payments are outsize or the
arrangements are not disclosed to the governments.

Of even greater concern to prosecutors in the United States are
unusually large payments made to foreign doctors who oversee the
growing number of clinical trials that drug and device makers conduct
abroad, according to Kirk Ogrosky, a former top federal prosecutor who
now represents drug and device makers at a Washington law firm.

More than 80 percent of the {*filter*} approved for sale in 2008 involved
trials in foreign countries, and 78 percent of all people who
participated in clinical trials were enrolled at foreign sites,
according to a recent investigation by Daniel R. Levinson, the
inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services.
Medical ethicists have long worried that many of these trials are
conducted in countries that federal auditors rarely visit and where
research controls may be scant.

Now, prosecutors are investigating whether the payments made to
doctors who conducted these studies abroad were appropriate. If
evidence shows that such payments have influenced the results of some
clinical trials, prosecutors will be inspecting the trials closely,
Mr. Ogrosky said. An article about the inquiry appeared Friday in The
Financial Times.

Last month, a federal drug official reported that he found repeated
instances in a landmark clinical trial of Avandia, a controversial
diabetes medicine, in which patients taking Avandia appeared to suffer
serious heart problems that were not counted in the studys crucial
tally of adverse events. Many of the studys trial sites were in
foreign countries, and the study is a main reason that Avandia remains
on the market in the United States. Government officials have not
accused GlaxoSmithKline, the trials sponsor, of fraud.

At the Justice Department, investigations that involve allegations of
patient harm rise straight to the top and will attract the immediate
attention of the F.B.I., Mr. Ogrosky said.

The pharmaceutical industry may be more vulnerable to such
investigations because its representatives overseas work on a daily
basis with officials or doctors employed by state health systems.

Because pharmaceutical companies are in the health care sector and
because, in so many foreign countries, heath sector employees could be
considered foreign officials, there is a heightened risk there, said
Jay Darden, a Washington lawyer and former federal prosecutor who
specialized in health care and foreign corrupt practice cases. But, he
said, just because some companies have publicly disclosed that they
are under investigation does not automatically mean they have violated
the foreign {*filter*} law.

Indeed, a number of drug makers and medical device companies have
reported in recent regulatory filings that they are under
investigation for possible violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices
Act.

In a regulatory filing earlier this month, for example, Merck said it
was cooperating with a federal investigation seeking information about
the companys activities in a number of countries.

Johnson & Johnson said in a regulatory filing that it had voluntary
disclosed to federal agencies that company subsidiaries abroad may
have made improper payments in connection with the sale of medical
devices in two countries.

Eli Lilly said it was cooperating with a federal investigation into
the activities of subsidiaries in Poland and other countries.

Meanwhile, the device maker Medtronic said it was cooperating with a
federal investigation into the companys activities in a number of
countries, including Greece, Poland, Germany, Turkey, Italy and
Malaysia. The device maker Zimmer also said it was the subject of
federal investigations in connection with the sale of its products in
a number of foreign countries.

In a speech in November, an official at the Justice Department alerted
drug makers that the agency would be focusing on the drug industry.

In some foreign countries and under certain circumstances, nearly
every aspect of the approval, ...

read more »



Wed, 30 Jan 2013 17:03:53 GMT
 NYT on "Foreign Corrupt Practices" (incorrect)

Quote:
































> Subject: NYT on "Foreign Corrupt Practices" (incorrect)

> Date: Aug 14, 2010 4:59 AM

> ARTICLE BELOW
> =======================================

> Well, "Lyme Disease" is clearly False
> Claims and RICO.
> Allen Steere (CDC officer) made the false
> claim with scientific fraud in Europe
> alone: http://www.***.com/
> with the bogus "high-passage" strains and
> recombinant OspA-B with NO LIPID ATTACHED
> (not likely to produce antibodies without
> the lipid moeities attached).

> And, as I told the FDA Vaccine committee,
> no one among the *invited* labs (to the
> Dearborn conference) agreed with Steere's
> crazy proposal: http://www.***.com/

> - - http://www.***.com/
> "The Act establishes liability when any person or entity improperly
> receives from or avoids payment to the Federal governmenttax fraud
> excepted. In summary, the Act prohibits:

> 1. Knowingly presenting, or causing to be presented a false claim for
> payment or approval;
> 2. Knowingly making, using, or causing to be made or used, a false
> record or statement material to a false or fraudulent claim;
> 3. Conspiring to commit any violation of the False Claims Act;
> 4. Falsely certifying the type or amount of property to be used by the
> Government;
> 5. Certifying receipt of property on a document without completely
> knowing that the information is true;
> 6. Knowingly buying Government property from an unauthorized officer
> of the Government, and;
> 7. Knowingly making, using, or causing to be made or used a false
> record to avoid, or decrease an obligation to pay or transmit property
> to the Government.
> - - -

> The Lyme crymes are easier to prosecute
> under False Claims and RICO, although the
> Yale-UConn PEDIATRIC CRIMINAL LYME TRIAL took
> place in the Czech Republic: http://www.***.com/

> And why is Lyme RICO?
> Because only Imugen and Yale's L2 Diagnostics
> were partnered with Corixa to use the RICO
> method. ?This is in evidence in the US Attorney's
> orifice in New Haven, CT, but since the filing of
> the RICO complaint, Corixa was purchased by SmithKline: http://www.***.com/

> Either this NYT article is wrong or the FBI is lying
> because the FBI and the USDOJ has heard from me at
> least 200,000 times: http://www.***.com/

> They never follow up on anything.

> Think about it: ?They're cops. ?Cops are even
> more stupid, paranoid, arrogant and unable to
> think outside the box than lawyers. ?They're
> as pitifully dense as an {*filter*}. ?It's the
> same *DISORDER* of the *mind* to think you're
> better than everyone else and therefore don't
> have to think.

> KMDickson http://www.***.com/ ://www.relapsingfever.org
> ===========================================================================-============== http://www.***.com/

> August 13, 2010
> U.S. Inquiry of Drug Makers Is Widened
> By GARDINER HARRIS and NATASHA SINGER

> At least a dozen major drug and device makers are under investigation
> by federal prosecutors and securities regulators in a broadening
> {*filter*} inquiry into whether the companies made illegal payments to
> doctors and health officials in foreign countries.

> In previous investigations, federal officials have charged that some
> companies made these kinds of payments to encourage doctors abroad to
> order or prescribe their products. In the United States, companies
> routinely hire doctors as consultants to market {*filter*} and devices to
> their colleagues and other health professionals at medical conventions
> and small gatherings. Such consulting arrangements are legal in the
> United States as long as the companies do not pay doctors directly to
> write prescriptions for their products.

> But in much of the rest of the world, doctors are government
> employees. And even consulting arrangements that would be considered
> routine in the United States might violate the Foreign Corrupt
> Practices Act, particularly if the payments are outsize or the
> arrangements are not disclosed to the governments.

> Of even greater concern to prosecutors in the United States are
> unusually large payments made to foreign doctors who oversee the
> growing number of clinical trials that drug and device makers conduct
> abroad, according to Kirk Ogrosky, a former top federal prosecutor who
> now represents drug and device makers at a Washington law firm.

> More than 80 percent of the {*filter*} approved for sale in 2008 involved
> trials in foreign countries, and 78 percent of all people who
> participated in clinical trials were enrolled at foreign sites,
> according to a recent investigation by Daniel R. Levinson, the
> inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services.
> Medical ethicists have long worried that many of these trials are
> conducted in countries that federal auditors rarely visit and where
> research controls may be scant.

> Now, prosecutors are investigating whether the payments made to
> doctors who conducted these studies abroad were appropriate. If
> evidence shows that such payments have influenced the results of some
> clinical trials, prosecutors will be inspecting the trials closely,
> Mr. Ogrosky said. An article about the inquiry appeared Friday in The
> Financial Times.

> Last month, a federal drug official reported that he found repeated
> instances in a landmark clinical trial of Avandia, a controversial
> diabetes medicine, in which patients taking Avandia appeared to suffer
> serious heart problems that were not counted in the studys crucial
> tally of adverse events. Many of the studys trial sites were in
> foreign countries, and the study is a main reason that Avandia remains
> on the market in the United States. Government officials have not
> accused GlaxoSmithKline, the trials sponsor, of fraud.

> At the Justice Department, investigations that involve allegations of
> patient harm rise straight to the top and will attract the immediate
> attention of the F.B.I., Mr. Ogrosky said.

> The pharmaceutical industry may be more vulnerable to such
> investigations because its representatives overseas work on a daily
> basis with officials or doctors employed by state health systems.

> Because pharmaceutical companies are in the health care sector and
> because, in so many foreign countries, heath sector employees could be
> considered foreign officials, there is a heightened risk there, said
> Jay Darden, a Washington lawyer and former federal prosecutor who
> specialized in health care and foreign corrupt practice cases. But, he
> said, just because some companies have publicly disclosed that they
> are under investigation does not automatically mean they have violated
> the foreign {*filter*} law.

> Indeed, a number of drug makers and medical device companies have
> reported in recent regulatory filings that they are under
> investigation for possible violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices
> Act.

> In a regulatory filing earlier this month, for example, Merck said it
> was cooperating with a federal investigation seeking information about
> the companys activities in a number of countries.

> Johnson & Johnson said in a regulatory filing that it had voluntary
> disclosed to federal agencies that company subsidiaries abroad may
> have made improper payments in connection with the sale of medical
> devices in two countries.

> Eli Lilly said it was cooperating with a federal investigation into
> the activities of subsidiaries in Poland and other countries.

> Meanwhile, the device maker Medtronic said it was cooperating with a
> federal investigation into the companys activities in a number of
> countries, including Greece, Poland, Germany, Turkey, Italy and
> Malaysia. The device maker Zimmer also said it was the

...

read more »



Thu, 31 Jan 2013 12:56:47 GMT
 NYT on "Foreign Corrupt Practices" (incorrect)

I'd like to say that Steere would have
been better off stickin with the violin,
but he was no good at any kind of
fiddlin.  Most particularly in the lab.



Fri, 01 Feb 2013 00:07:08 GMT
 NYT on "Foreign Corrupt Practices" (incorrect)

Quote:
> I'd like to say that Steere would have
> been better off stickin with the violin,
> but he was no good at any kind of
> fiddlin. ?Most particularly in the lab.

I said the same thing before - too bad he didn't stick to the
violin....the jerk---plus draft dodger.  Actually did you notice all
those ones on the political side really if you look especially in
their eyes --I am a bit physic --something very evil.
even Wormser - his eyes look like blue or grey but something really
evil like ---I bet Steere must be almost 80 yrs old now or late 70's?
I hate to say it but his photo in that NY Times article stalking
steere---of him standing in lab with that white coat - he really looks
like a devil.......if any of them are married - I wonder who would be
such a jerk to get married to any of them...I bet most are
not.....because-----------------


Wed, 06 Feb 2013 14:03:56 GMT
 NYT on "Foreign Corrupt Practices" (incorrect)

Quote:

> > I'd like to say that Steere would have
> > been better off stickin with the violin,
> > but he was no good at any kind of
> > fiddlin. ?Most particularly in the lab.

> I said the same thing before - too bad he didn't stick to the
> violin....the jerk---plus draft dodger. ?Actually did you notice all
> those ones on the political side really if you look especially in
> their eyes --I am a bit physic --something very evil.
> even Wormser - his eyes look like blue or grey but something really
> evil like ---I bet Steere must be almost 80 yrs old now or late 70's?
> I hate to say it but his photo in that NY Times article stalking
> steere---of him standing in lab with that white coat - he really looks
> like a devil.......if any of them are married - I wonder who would be
> such a jerk to get married to any of them...I bet most are
> not.....because-----------------

Willy thinks Steere is a total ignoramus:
http://underourskin.com/blog/?p=191


Wed, 06 Feb 2013 22:37:21 GMT
 
 [ 5 post ] 

 Relevant Pages 

1. news flash, another corrupt "scientist"

2. NYT "Science Times" Section

3. NYT: FDA and "judges"- a dangerous confluence of stupidity

4. NYT Fish's "Academic"-Wannabee Brain-Scramble

5. NYT: "Broken in U.S.A."

6. Foreign "PDR"

7. Foreign "PDR"

8. "Foreign Sensation" After Two Weeks

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