Hey- I got the Autism Infection Study!!!! 
Author Message
 Hey- I got the Autism Infection Study!!!!

IT was the same one that got written up for that article about vancomycin
helping autistic kids (while they were on it).  IT IS THE SADDEST THING to
read!! Boy oh boy!!!! This one little boy totally did what my duaghter did when
she went on abx- he woke up- everything changed- he got better- and betetr- and
better!!!

Then they took him off.

But 8 of 10 autitstic children showed clear improvement while on abx- but then
they took them off.

Agh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



Tue, 04 Nov 2003 07:22:04 GMT
 Hey- I got the Autism Infection Study!!!!
Sarah -- Could you please tell me where I can find it?    Thanks, Suji


Tue, 04 Nov 2003 08:51:21 GMT
 Hey- I got the Autism Infection Study!!!!
Quote:
>Could you please tell me where I can find it?    Thanks, Suji

J Child Neurol 2000 Jul;15(7):429-35 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut  

Short-term benefit from {*filter*}vancomycin treatment of regressive-onset autism.

Sandler RH, Finegold SM, Bolte ER, Buchanan CP, Maxwell AP, Vaisanen ML, Nelson
MN, Wexler HM.

Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Rush Children's Hospital,

In most cases symptoms of autism begin in early infancy. However, a subset of
children appears to develop normally until a clear deterioration is observed.
Many parents of children with "regressive"-onset autism have noted antecedent
antibiotic exposure followed by chronic diarrhea. We speculated that, in a
subgroup of children, disruption of indigenous gut flora might promote
colonization by one or more neurotoxin-producing bacteria, contributing, at
least in part, to their autistic symptomatology. To help test this hypothesis,
11 children with regressive-onset autism were recruited for an intervention
trial using a minimally absorbed {*filter*}antibiotic. Entry criteria included
antecedent broad-spectrum antimicrobial exposure followed by chronic persistent
diarrhea, deterioration of previously acquired skills, and then autistic
features. Short-term improvement was noted using multiple pre- and post-therapy
evaluations. These included coded, paired videotapes scored by a clinical
psychologist blinded to treatment status; these noted improvement in 8 of 10
children studied. Unfortunately, these gains had largely waned at follow-up.
Although the protocol used is not suggested as useful therapy, these results
indicate that a possible gut flora-brain connection warrants further
investigation, as it might lead to greater pathophysiologic insight and
meaningful prevention or treatment in a subset of children with autism.

PMID: 10921511 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

J Child Neurol 2000 Jul;15(7):429-35 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut  

Short-term benefit from {*filter*}vancomycin treatment of regressive-onset autism.

Sandler RH, Finegold SM, Bolte ER, Buchanan CP, Maxwell AP, Vaisanen ML, Nelson
MN, Wexler HM.

Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Rush Children's Hospital,

In most cases symptoms of autism begin in early infancy. However, a subset of
children appears to develop normally until a clear deterioration is observed.
Many parents of children with "regressive"-onset autism have noted antecedent
antibiotic exposure followed by chronic diarrhea. We speculated that, in a
subgroup of children, disruption of indigenous gut flora might promote
colonization by one or more neurotoxin-producing bacteria, contributing, at
least in part, to their autistic symptomatology. To help test this hypothesis,
11 children with regressive-onset autism were recruited for an intervention
trial using a minimally absorbed {*filter*}antibiotic. Entry criteria included
antecedent broad-spectrum antimicrobial exposure followed by chronic persistent
diarrhea, deterioration of previously acquired skills, and then autistic
features. Short-term improvement was noted using multiple pre- and post-therapy
evaluations. These included coded, paired videotapes scored by a clinical
psychologist blinded to treatment status; these noted improvement in 8 of 10
children studied. Unfortunately, these gains had largely waned at follow-up.
Although the protocol used is not suggested as useful therapy, these results
indicate that a possible gut flora-brain connection warrants further
investigation, as it might lead to greater pathophysiologic insight and
meaningful prevention or treatment in a subset of children with autism.

PMID: 10921511 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



Tue, 04 Nov 2003 22:36:58 GMT
 
 [ 3 post ] 

 Relevant Pages 

1. hey, Tom never affords until Patrice gets the integral pipe sternly

2. Autism Research Institute on Chelation Therapy Studies for Individuals with Autism

3. Hey Montygram, how do you explain this study?

4. Hey hey hey- I ran TWO whole blocks yesterday*)!

5. Autism & ear infections

6. Autism an Infection?

7. Second Study Links Autism To MMR Jab

8. Conflict of interest fear over study of autism

9. Scots study on autism poses new question of MMR link


 
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software