An encounter with a "survivor" 
Author Message
 An encounter with a "survivor"

[Crossposted to a.s.c.b. and s.m.d.c.]

I met a woman in her early 90s who had terrible lymphedema in her right arm.
I asked her if it was from a mastectomy, and she said yes, but she'd had the
mastectomy *45* years ago (!) and only developed the lymphedema *3* years
ago.

She also said she now has "bone cancer."  I asked if that meant bone
metastases from the 1960 {*filter*} cancer, and she said yes.

As I say, this lady was very old, but she was cognitively intact.  I asked
someone else who knows her whether I had heard correctly (I thought maybe
she meant "4 or 5 years" rather than "45 years"), and this person confirmed
that the story was true.

Although it was certainly a good thing to hear that someone has survived for
45 years, I found it very disheartening to discover once again that you're
*never* "out of the woods" with {*filter*} cancer.

Any comments?

Eva



Sun, 04 May 2008 09:25:10 GMT
 An encounter with a "survivor"


Quote:
> [Crossposted to a.s.c.b. and s.m.d.c.]

> I met a woman in her early 90s who had terrible lymphedema in her right
> arm.
> I asked her if it was from a mastectomy, and she said yes, but she'd had
> the
> mastectomy *45* years ago (!) and only developed the lymphedema *3* years
> ago.

> She also said she now has "bone cancer."  I asked if that meant bone
> metastases from the 1960 {*filter*} cancer, and she said yes.

> As I say, this lady was very old, but she was cognitively intact.  I asked
> someone else who knows her whether I had heard correctly (I thought maybe
> she meant "4 or 5 years" rather than "45 years"), and this person
> confirmed
> that the story was true.

> Although it was certainly a good thing to hear that someone has survived
> for
> 45 years, I found it very disheartening to discover once again that you're
> *never* "out of the woods" with {*filter*} cancer.

> Any comments?

> Eva

{*filter*} cancer is unusual in that late mets although uncommon, are well
recognised.
Melanoma is a another one.
But for most of the rest of the common cancers, recurrence after 2 years is
unusual, and after 5, VERY unusual


Sun, 04 May 2008 10:54:57 GMT
 An encounter with a "survivor"
I am suffering from Merkel Cell Cancer and recurrence is the major
issue.  I understand what each and every {*filter*} cancer patient will go
through.

George



Mon, 05 May 2008 10:50:01 GMT
 An encounter with a "survivor"
My neighbour was 92 when she died, free of the disease, from heart
attack. I don't know the year she had had surgery but may find out if
you're interested - my guess is >35 years. I know for sure it was a
Halsted mastectomy from hell, but she never had visible lymphedema.
So yes, there are some people out there givig hope to the rest of us.
I think that when you get that old, every condition, injury or habit
you experienced sneaks out and jumps at you, even after years of
silence. Wish all the best to the lady.


Mon, 05 May 2008 21:26:01 GMT
 An encounter with a "survivor"


Quote:
> [Crossposted to a.s.c.b. and s.m.d.c.]

> I met a woman in her early 90s who had terrible lymphedema in her right
> arm.
> I asked her if it was from a mastectomy, and she said yes, but she'd had
> the
> mastectomy *45* years ago (!) and only developed the lymphedema *3* years
> ago.

> She also said she now has "bone cancer."  I asked if that meant bone
> metastases from the 1960 {*filter*} cancer, and she said yes.

> As I say, this lady was very old, but she was cognitively intact.  I asked
> someone else who knows her whether I had heard correctly (I thought maybe
> she meant "4 or 5 years" rather than "45 years"), and this person
> confirmed
> that the story was true.

> Although it was certainly a good thing to hear that someone has survived
> for
> 45 years, I found it very disheartening to discover once again that you're
> *never* "out of the woods" with {*filter*} cancer.

> Any comments?

> Eva

From my observations the anxieties never completely go away.  But time is a
sufficiently great healer that after a few years a very nearly normal life
is possible.

The anxieties.mainly surface when it is time to go back to the doctors  for
a check up.   This is one of the adverse effects of too aggressive medical
follow-up with constant re-investigation.   That is not shown to save lives.

The first few months after diagnosis and treatment are by far the worst.
Every little twinge, or thickening   and the worst is feared.

Peter Moran

www.cancerwatcher.com



Tue, 06 May 2008 03:37:53 GMT
 
 [ 5 post ] 

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