March 2012 Ancient Americas Lectures and Conferences 
Author Message
 March 2012 Ancient Americas Lectures and Conferences

Thursday, March 1, 2012, 7:30 PM
AIA Lecture
"Underwater Maya: Discovery, Mapping, and Excavating in a Peat Bog
Below the Sea Floor, Belize"
Heather McKillop
While walking in a shallow lagoon in southern Belize in search of
briquetagebroken pots used to boil brine over fires to make saltwe
made an accidental discovery that has transformed our knowledge of the
ancient Maya. We found wooden posts and artifactsincluding the only
reported ancient Maya canoe paddleperfectly preserved in a peat bog
below the sea floor. The peat is mangrove peat, formed from
accumulation of debris and roots as the salt-water red mangroves kept
pace with rising seas. We did find lots of briquetage, but also the
buildings and other structures associated with a massive salt
production industry that reached its peak during the height of the
Late Classic Maya civilization (A.D. 600-900), when demand at the
inland cities for this basic biological necessity was highest. Since
wood is rarely preserved in the tropical landscape of Central America,
the Paynes Creek Salt Works provide a stunning example of the kinds of
wooden buildings used by the ancient Maya. In this presentation, I
summarize the discovery and mapping of some 4000 wooden posts between
2005 and 2009, as well as the ongoing field research excavating
Ancient Maya Wooden Architecture and the Salt Industry. With a Site
Preservation Grant from the AIA for Underwater Maya, I am working
with the local communities to provide displays and education,
including an observation platform at the sites, to promote tourism
and protection of these ancient Maya treasures of the sea.
Huntsville, Alabama
http://www.***.com/

Thursday, March 1, 2012, 5:30 PM
Dumbarton Oaks Lecture
"Water and the Aztec Landscape in the Valley of Mexico"
Barbara E. Mundy, Fordham University

or call 202-339-6440
Music Room
Dumbarton Oaks
Washington DC
http://www.***.com/

Mar 2, 6:45 PM
Pre-Columbian Society of Washington DC Lecture
"The First Maya "Collapse": End of the Preclassic Period at El Palmar,
Guatemala"
James Doyle
Scholars have long investigated the political intrigues and
environmental problems surrounding the famed Classic Maya collapse.
This presentation addresses similar factors involved with the lesser-
known collapse at the end of the Preclassic Period (ca. 1000 BCE - 250
CE). During this crucial period, many sites experienced convulsive
changes in population, perhaps signaling widespread migrations and
social changes prior to the rise of Classic dynastic kingdoms. Using
El Palmar as a case study, our speaker will examine the anthropogenic
and ecological factors that led to the Preclassic-Classic transition,
and the development of political authority and social complexity in
the Maya Lowlands.
James Doyle is a  PhD candidate at Brown University. His research
focuses on the archaeology of Mesoamerica, specifically monumental
architecture of the Preclassic Period.  Currently, he is a Junior
Fellow in Pre-Columbian Studies at Dumbarton Oaks.
Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives,
1201 17th Street (17th and M Streets) NW, Washington D.C.
http://www.***.com/

March 2-3, 2012
"Popol Vuh!; A Symposium Celebrating the Ancient Maya Creation Myth
in Literature, Iconography, Epigraphy, Ethnohistory and Archaeology"
University of California, Merced, COB 105
Free and open to the public
The Popol Vuh of the ancient Maya is one of the oldest and most
complete Precolumbian literary texts to survive the Spanish Conquest.
The text has been translated over 82 times, into European and Maya
languages as well as Chinese, Korean, and Japanese. Its elegant poetry
has been compared to the Iliad and Odyssey of Greece or the Ramayana
of India. It is commonly referred to as the Maya "Bible" and the
analogy is well-earned, as it is in fact "biblical" in its temporal
depth and overarching cosmological foundations. But here the
comparison ends as it is demonstratively an ancient text, parts of
which can be traced to the Preclassic period. The text has become a
valuable resource in understanding ancient Maya cosmology, myth and
religion, and provides a window into the soul of ancient Maya people
by giving us a glimpse into their values, morals, and beliefs. This
symposium celebrates the Popol Vuh and the scholarship that the text
has inspired.
Presenters: Gerardo Aldana, Jaime Awe, Ellen Bell, Oswaldo Chinchilla,
Allen Christenson, David Freidel, Julia Guernsey, Nathan Henne,
Barbara MacLeod, Holley Moyes, and Dorie Reents-Budet
Keynote address: Michael Coe
Sponsored by University of California, Merced Center for Research in
Humanities and Arts.
Contact: Holley Moyes
http://www.***.com/

March 5, 6:00 PM
Southwest Seminars Lecture
"Chaco Canyon: The Enigmas of Fajada Butte and the Symbolism of the
Center"
Dr. J. McKim Malville
Hotel Santa Fe
Santa Fe, New Mexico
http://www.***.com/

Tues. March 6, 7:00 PM
Oregon Archaeological Society Lecture
"Newest Findings of Field Work in Harney County"
Pat OGrady updating members on his 2011 field excavations and surveys
in and around Sheep Mountain in Harney County, an identified Clovis
site
Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI)
1945 SE Water Street,
Portland, Oregon
http://www.***.com/

March 6, 7:00 PM
Illinois Valley Archaeological Society Lecture
"The End of Time: Maya, Aztec, Pawnee, and Pueblo Views of the End of
the World
News media reports about the so-called Maya prediction of the end of
the world in 2012 fail to note that many Native American peoples, and
peoples elsewhere in the world, have a cyclical view of time in which
a cycle of time ends and a new one begins. For example, the Hopi in
Arizona are now in their Fourth World. The Maya did predict the end of
a time cycle in roughly 2012, but it was to be followed by the start
of another 5,000-year cycle, not the end of time itself. This
presentation will focus on cosmology and cyclical time for four Native
American groups.
Dr. Jonathan Reyman, Curator of Anthropology at the Illinois State
Museum
{*filter*}son Mounds Auditorium
Lewistown, Illinois
http://www.***.com/

March 6, 6:00 PM
Center for Desert Archaeology Lecture
"La Calle; Spatial Conflicts and Urban Renewal in a Southwest City"
Lydia Otero, University of Arizona
Casa Vicente,
375 S. Stone Avenue,
Tucson, Arizona
http://www.***.com/

March 6, 7:00 PM
The Hisatsinom Chapter of the Colorado Archaeological Society Lecture
"New Research with the Earliest Perishable Collections: The Green and
Lang Collections at the Field Museum"
Dr Laurie Webster
During the 1890s, local collectors including the Wetherill brothers,
Charles McLoyd and Charles Cary Graham, Charles Lang, and Platt Lyman
excavated literally thousands of Basketmaker and Pueblo-period
artifacts from rock shelters and cliff houses in southeastern Utah.
Despite the importance and rarity of these collections, only a handful
of these artifacts have been studied or published. Several years ago,
Laurie Webster began photodocumenting the textiles, baskets, sandals,
hides, wooden implements, and other perishable artifacts in these
collections to make them more widely known to other archaeologists and
the public. In 2011, she spent three weeks at the Field Museum of
Natural History in Chicago surveying two of these collections: the
Green Collection made by McLoyd and Graham in 1891 and the Ryerson-
Lang Collection made by Lang in Grand Gulch and the Bluff area in
1894-1895. In her presentation, Webster will highlight some of the
more remarkable perishable artifacts encountered during the project
and present new insights gleaned from the study of these early
collections.
Laurie Webster is an anthropologist and specialist is Southwestern
perishable material culture.  She is a visiting scholar in the
Department of Anthropology at the University of Arizona and a Research
Associate at both the American Museum of Natural History and the Crow
Canyon Archaeological Center.  Her publications include the edited
volume Beyond Cloth and Cordage: Archaeological Textile Research in
the Americas and the book Collecting the Weavers Art: The William
Claflin Collection of Southwestern Textiles, as well as numerous
journal articles on archaeological perishables.
Cortez Cultural Center,
25 North Market Street,
Cortez, Colorado
http://www.***.com/

March 8, 6:00 PM
Art Institute of Chicago Lecture
"The Courtly Art of Mayan Painters"
Mary Ellen Miller, Yale University, explores links between Classic
Mayan vase artists and mural painters as she investigates early
sources for their motifs.
Fullerton Hall
Art Institute
Chicago, Illinois
http://www.***.com/

March 8, 6:00 PM
Denver Art Museum Lecture
"Of Cult Bearers & Sacred Bundles: The Imagery of Ritual & Symbolism
in Mississippian Art"
Join F. Kent Reilly for this opportunity to learn about the artistic
religious symbol system and rulership of the fascinating moundbuilding
culture of the American Southeast.
For further information, call 720-913-0165.
Sponsored by The Douglas Society, a DAM support group.
North Building, Lower Level
Denver Art Museum
Denver, Colorado
http://www.***.com/

Mar. 8, 7:35 p.m.
Harvard Extension School Lecture
"Apocalypse Now: How the World Ends (or Doesnt) in World Religions"
It is widely prophesized that the end of the world will take place on ...

read more »



Sun, 17 Aug 2014 14:39:35 GMT
 March 2012 Ancient Americas Lectures and Conferences

Thursday, March 1, 2012, 7:30 PM
AIA Lecture
"Underwater Maya: Discovery, Mapping, and Excavating in a Peat Bog
Below the Sea Floor, Belize"
Heather McKillop
While walking in a shallow lagoon in southern Belize in search of
briquetagebroken pots used to boil brine over fires to make saltwe
made an accidental discovery that has transformed our knowledge of the
ancient Maya. We found wooden posts and artifactsincluding the only
reported ancient Maya canoe paddleperfectly preserved in a peat bog
below the sea floor. The peat is mangrove peat, formed from
accumulation of debris and roots as the salt-water red mangroves kept
pace with rising seas. We did find lots of briquetage, but also the
buildings and other structures associated with a massive salt
production industry that reached its peak during the height of the
Late Classic Maya civilization (A.D. 600-900), when demand at the
inland cities for this basic biological necessity was highest. Since
wood is rarely preserved in the tropical landscape of Central America,
the Paynes Creek Salt Works provide a stunning example of the kinds of
wooden buildings used by the ancient Maya. In this presentation, I
summarize the discovery and mapping of some 4000 wooden posts between
2005 and 2009, as well as the ongoing field research excavating
Ancient Maya Wooden Architecture and the Salt Industry. With a Site
Preservation Grant from the AIA for Underwater Maya, I am working
with the local communities to provide displays and education,
including an observation platform at the sites, to promote tourism
and protection of these ancient Maya treasures of the sea.
Huntsville, Alabama
http://www.***.com/

Thursday, March 1, 2012, 5:30 PM
Dumbarton Oaks Lecture
"Water and the Aztec Landscape in the Valley of Mexico"
Barbara E. Mundy, Fordham University

or call 202-339-6440
Music Room
Dumbarton Oaks
Washington DC
http://www.***.com/

Mar 2, 6:45 PM
Pre-Columbian Society of Washington DC Lecture
"The First Maya "Collapse": End of the Preclassic Period at El Palmar,
Guatemala"
James Doyle
Scholars have long investigated the political intrigues and
environmental problems surrounding the famed Classic Maya collapse.
This presentation addresses similar factors involved with the lesser-
known collapse at the end of the Preclassic Period (ca. 1000 BCE - 250
CE). During this crucial period, many sites experienced convulsive
changes in population, perhaps signaling widespread migrations and
social changes prior to the rise of Classic dynastic kingdoms. Using
El Palmar as a case study, our speaker will examine the anthropogenic
and ecological factors that led to the Preclassic-Classic transition,
and the development of political authority and social complexity in
the Maya Lowlands.
James Doyle is a  PhD candidate at Brown University. His research
focuses on the archaeology of Mesoamerica, specifically monumental
architecture of the Preclassic Period.  Currently, he is a Junior
Fellow in Pre-Columbian Studies at Dumbarton Oaks.
Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives,
1201 17th Street (17th and M Streets) NW, Washington D.C.
http://www.***.com/

March 2-3, 2012
"Popol Vuh!; A Symposium Celebrating the Ancient Maya Creation Myth
in Literature, Iconography, Epigraphy, Ethnohistory and Archaeology"
University of California, Merced, COB 105
Free and open to the public
The Popol Vuh of the ancient Maya is one of the oldest and most
complete Precolumbian literary texts to survive the Spanish Conquest.
The text has been translated over 82 times, into European and Maya
languages as well as Chinese, Korean, and Japanese. Its elegant poetry
has been compared to the Iliad and Odyssey of Greece or the Ramayana
of India. It is commonly referred to as the Maya "Bible" and the
analogy is well-earned, as it is in fact "biblical" in its temporal
depth and overarching cosmological foundations. But here the
comparison ends as it is demonstratively an ancient text, parts of
which can be traced to the Preclassic period. The text has become a
valuable resource in understanding ancient Maya cosmology, myth and
religion, and provides a window into the soul of ancient Maya people
by giving us a glimpse into their values, morals, and beliefs. This
symposium celebrates the Popol Vuh and the scholarship that the text
has inspired.
Presenters: Gerardo Aldana, Jaime Awe, Ellen Bell, Oswaldo Chinchilla,
Allen Christenson, David Freidel, Julia Guernsey, Nathan Henne,
Barbara MacLeod, Holley Moyes, and Dorie Reents-Budet
Keynote address: Michael Coe
Sponsored by University of California, Merced Center for Research in
Humanities and Arts.
Contact: Holley Moyes
http://www.***.com/

March 5, 6:00 PM
Southwest Seminars Lecture
"Chaco Canyon: The Enigmas of Fajada Butte and the Symbolism of the
Center"
Dr. J. McKim Malville
Hotel Santa Fe
Santa Fe, New Mexico
http://www.***.com/

Tues. March 6, 7:00 PM
Oregon Archaeological Society Lecture
"Newest Findings of Field Work in Harney County"
Pat OGrady updating members on his 2011 field excavations and surveys
in and around Sheep Mountain in Harney County, an identified Clovis
site
Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI)
1945 SE Water Street,
Portland, Oregon
http://www.***.com/

March 6, 7:00 PM
Illinois Valley Archaeological Society Lecture
"The End of Time: Maya, Aztec, Pawnee, and Pueblo Views of the End of
the World
News media reports about the so-called Maya prediction of the end of
the world in 2012 fail to note that many Native American peoples, and
peoples elsewhere in the world, have a cyclical view of time in which
a cycle of time ends and a new one begins. For example, the Hopi in
Arizona are now in their Fourth World. The Maya did predict the end of
a time cycle in roughly 2012, but it was to be followed by the start
of another 5,000-year cycle, not the end of time itself. This
presentation will focus on cosmology and cyclical time for four Native
American groups.
Dr. Jonathan Reyman, Curator of Anthropology at the Illinois State
Museum
{*filter*}son Mounds Auditorium
Lewistown, Illinois
http://www.***.com/

March 6, 6:00 PM
Center for Desert Archaeology Lecture
"La Calle; Spatial Conflicts and Urban Renewal in a Southwest City"
Lydia Otero, University of Arizona
Casa Vicente,
375 S. Stone Avenue,
Tucson, Arizona
http://www.***.com/

March 6, 7:00 PM
The Hisatsinom Chapter of the Colorado Archaeological Society Lecture
"New Research with the Earliest Perishable Collections: The Green and
Lang Collections at the Field Museum"
Dr Laurie Webster
During the 1890s, local collectors including the Wetherill brothers,
Charles McLoyd and Charles Cary Graham, Charles Lang, and Platt Lyman
excavated literally thousands of Basketmaker and Pueblo-period
artifacts from rock shelters and cliff houses in southeastern Utah.
Despite the importance and rarity of these collections, only a handful
of these artifacts have been studied or published. Several years ago,
Laurie Webster began photodocumenting the textiles, baskets, sandals,
hides, wooden implements, and other perishable artifacts in these
collections to make them more widely known to other archaeologists and
the public. In 2011, she spent three weeks at the Field Museum of
Natural History in Chicago surveying two of these collections: the
Green Collection made by McLoyd and Graham in 1891 and the Ryerson-
Lang Collection made by Lang in Grand Gulch and the Bluff area in
1894-1895. In her presentation, Webster will highlight some of the
more remarkable perishable artifacts encountered during the project
and present new insights gleaned from the study of these early
collections.
Laurie Webster is an anthropologist and specialist is Southwestern
perishable material culture.  She is a visiting scholar in the
Department of Anthropology at the University of Arizona and a Research
Associate at both the American Museum of Natural History and the Crow
Canyon Archaeological Center.  Her publications include the edited
volume Beyond Cloth and Cordage: Archaeological Textile Research in
the Americas and the book Collecting the Weavers Art: The William
Claflin Collection of Southwestern Textiles, as well as numerous
journal articles on archaeological perishables.
Cortez Cultural Center,
25 North Market Street,
Cortez, Colorado
http://www.***.com/

March 8, 6:00 PM
Art Institute of Chicago Lecture
"The Courtly Art of Mayan Painters"
Mary Ellen Miller, Yale University, explores links between Classic
Mayan vase artists and mural painters as she investigates early
sources for their motifs.
Fullerton Hall
Art Institute
Chicago, Illinois
http://www.***.com/

March 8, 6:00 PM
Denver Art Museum Lecture
"Of Cult Bearers & Sacred Bundles: The Imagery of Ritual & Symbolism
in Mississippian Art"
Join F. Kent Reilly for this opportunity to learn about the artistic
religious symbol system and rulership of the fascinating moundbuilding
culture of the American Southeast.
For further information, call 720-913-0165.
Sponsored by The Douglas Society, a DAM support group.
North Building, Lower Level
Denver Art Museum
Denver, Colorado
http://www.***.com/

Mar. 8, 7:35 p.m.
Harvard Extension School Lecture
"Apocalypse Now: How the World Ends (or Doesnt) in World Religions"
It is widely prophesized that the end of the world will take place on ...

read more »



Sun, 17 Aug 2014 14:39:36 GMT
 
 [ 2 post ] 

 Relevant Pages 

1. January 2012 Ancient Americas Lectures and Conferences

2. February 2012 Ancient Americas Lectures and Conferences

3. April 2012 Ancient Americas Lectures and Conferences

4. May 2012 Ancient Americas Lectures and Conferences

5. January 2012 Ancient Americas Lectures and Conferences

6. February 2012 Ancient Americas Lectures and Conferences

7. April 2012 Ancient Americas Lectures and Conferences

8. May 2012 Ancient Americas lectures and conferences


 
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