"Finding Atlantis" (Sunday tv program) 
Author Message
 "Finding Atlantis" (Sunday tv program)
http://www.***.com/


Thu, 29 Aug 2013 16:53:05 GMT
 "Finding Atlantis" (Sunday tv program)
On Sun, 13 Mar 2011 00:53:05 -0800 (PST), in sci.archaeology, C. Ikehara

Quote:
>http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/12/us-tsunami-atlantis-idUSTRE...

Looks like they are getting a lot of publicity, but it's concerning that
Freund (whose academic discipline is history, not archaeology - also a
Rabbi) suggests the Atlanteans may have founded civilization
http://westhartford.patch.com/articles/has-a-university-of-hartford-p...].
See also Eric Cline's review of a booklet of his
[http://www.bib-arch.org/reviews/review-digging-through-the-bible.asp].
Freund and his colleagues are advisors to Simcha Jacobovici
[http://robertcargill.com/2011/01/07/eric-cline-reviews-richard-freund/

Doug
--
Doug Weller --
A Director and Moderator of The Hall of Ma'at http://www.hallofmaat.com
Doug's Archaeology Site: http://www.ramtops.co.uk
Amun - co-owner/co-moderator http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Amun/



Sat, 31 Aug 2013 23:08:09 GMT
 "Finding Atlantis" (Sunday tv program)
On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 15:08:09 +0000, Doug Weller

Quote:

>On Sun, 13 Mar 2011 00:53:05 -0800 (PST), in sci.archaeology, C. Ikehara

>>http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/12/us-tsunami-atlantis-idUSTRE...

>Looks like they are getting a lot of publicity, but it's concerning that
>Freund (whose academic discipline is history, not archaeology - also a
>Rabbi) suggests the Atlanteans may have founded civilization

I think you may be misrepresenting his statement:

  "What if Atlantis was located in Spain and the origin of
   civilization didn't happen in the Middle East but happened in
   Spain?" Freund said he asked himself. "I think that the Atlanteans
   are the parents of the Phoenicians."

This is not quite the same as the ideas you attributed to him, unless
you believe civilization descended through the Phoenecians.

Quote:
>http://westhartford.patch.com/articles/has-a-university-of-hartford-p...].
>See also Eric Cline's review of a booklet of his
>[http://www.bib-arch.org/reviews/review-digging-through-the-bible.asp].
>Freund and his colleagues are advisors to Simcha Jacobovici
>[http://robertcargill.com/2011/01/07/eric-cline-reviews-richard-freund/

>Doug

Regards,

Eric Stevens



Sun, 01 Sep 2013 05:03:50 GMT
 "Finding Atlantis" (Sunday tv program)

Quote:
> On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 15:08:09 +0000, Doug Weller

>> On Sun, 13 Mar 2011 00:53:05 -0800 (PST), in sci.archaeology, C. Ikehara

>>> http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/12/us-tsunami-atlantis-idUSTRE...

>> Looks like they are getting a lot of publicity, but it's concerning that
>> Freund (whose academic discipline is history, not archaeology - also a
>> Rabbi) suggests the Atlanteans may have founded civilization

> I think you may be misrepresenting his statement:

>    "What if Atlantis was located in Spain and the origin of
>     civilization didn't happen in the Middle East but happened in
>     Spain?" Freund said he asked himself. "I think that the Atlanteans
>     are the parents of the Phoenicians."

> This is not quite the same as the ideas you attributed to him, unless
> you believe civilization descended through the Phoenecians.

It seems unlikely to me that an Iberian Atlantis would spawn a sea-faring
folk in the Levant.

Also, when I saw the program, I don't recall hearing any discussion of
dating, though I could have missed it. As you know, Plato's dating of the
disaster to ca. 9,000 BC is useless, as it would require a powerful Athens,
not to mention Egypt, to have been in existence millennia before any
archaeological support for either.

Quote:
>> http://westhartford.patch.com/articles/has-a-university-of-hartford-p...].
>> See also Eric Cline's review of a booklet of his
>> [http://www.bib-arch.org/reviews/review-digging-through-the-bible.asp].
>> Freund and his colleagues are advisors to Simcha Jacobovici
>> [http://robertcargill.com/2011/01/07/eric-cline-reviews-richard-freund/

>> Doug

> Regards,

> Eric Stevens

--
Tom


Sun, 01 Sep 2013 06:18:00 GMT
 "Finding Atlantis" (Sunday tv program)

Quote:
> On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 15:08:09 +0000, Doug Weller

>> On Sun, 13 Mar 2011 00:53:05 -0800 (PST), in sci.archaeology, C. Ikehara

>>> http://www.***.com/
>> Looks like they are getting a lot of publicity, but it's concerning that
>> Freund (whose academic discipline is history, not archaeology - also a
>> Rabbi) suggests the Atlanteans may have founded civilization
> I think you may be misrepresenting his statement:
>   "What if Atlantis was located in Spain and the origin of
>    civilization didn't happen in the Middle East but happened in
>    Spain?" Freund said he asked himself. "I think that the Atlanteans
>    are the parents of the Phoenicians."

        It is much more likely the other way around and that what they have found is
Tartessos which is known to have been on the Atlantic coast. That was most
likely a Phoenician city and trading with England for tin.

        The discovery of this "circular" area was discussed here years ago. Seeing a
circle required more than a little imagination. It was at best a half circle
and without the imagination the outline of a harbor rather than of a city.

--
Huck Finn said {*filter*} so much people today might think he was black.
        -- The Iron Webmaster, 4297
  http://www.***.com/
Tue Mar 15 20:14:50 EDT 2011



Sun, 01 Sep 2013 08:22:00 GMT
 "Finding Atlantis" (Sunday tv program)
On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 17:18:00 -0500, Tom McDonald

Quote:


>> On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 15:08:09 +0000, Doug Weller

>>> On Sun, 13 Mar 2011 00:53:05 -0800 (PST), in sci.archaeology, C. Ikehara

>>>> http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/12/us-tsunami-atlantis-idUSTRE...

>>> Looks like they are getting a lot of publicity, but it's concerning that
>>> Freund (whose academic discipline is history, not archaeology - also a
>>> Rabbi) suggests the Atlanteans may have founded civilization

>> I think you may be misrepresenting his statement:

>>    "What if Atlantis was located in Spain and the origin of
>>     civilization didn't happen in the Middle East but happened in
>>     Spain?" Freund said he asked himself. "I think that the Atlanteans
>>     are the parents of the Phoenicians."

>> This is not quite the same as the ideas you attributed to him, unless
>> you believe civilization descended through the Phoenecians.

>It seems unlikely to me that an Iberian Atlantis would spawn a sea-faring
>folk in the Levant.

Is it any less unlikely than an Eastern Mediterranean/Levantine
civilization founding an enduring city on the Atlantic sea board of
Spain?

Quote:

>Also, when I saw the program, I don't recall hearing any discussion of
>dating, though I could have missed it. As you know, Plato's dating of the
>disaster to ca. 9,000 BC is useless, as it would require a powerful Athens,
>not to mention Egypt, to have been in existence millennia before any
>archaeological support for either.

Umm - not necessarily. The original story was purportedly told to
Solon in the Egyptian or Greek language of slightly more than 2500
years ago and then translated/transcribed to only slightly less
ancient Greek and (for most of us) again translated to modern English.
The events of the story were dated in the text to 8000 years before
the original telling, i.e. about 8,500BC.

What is overlooked by modern readers is that at the time of the
telling the Egyptian calendar was based on the lunar month and it may
well be that in the original telling the events of the story were held
to have occurred not 8000 years but 8000 lunar months previously. This
is a period of approximately 596 years of the present calendar. On
this basis the events of Atlantis occurred approximately 3100 years
ago i.e. c 1100BC.

Assuming that the story is true, for a variety of reasons, the 1100BC
date makes much more sense than 8,500BC date.

Quote:

>>> http://westhartford.patch.com/articles/has-a-university-of-hartford-p...].
>>> See also Eric Cline's review of a booklet of his
>>> [http://www.bib-arch.org/reviews/review-digging-through-the-bible.asp].
>>> Freund and his colleagues are advisors to Simcha Jacobovici
>>> [http://robertcargill.com/2011/01/07/eric-cline-reviews-richard-freund/

>>> Doug

>> Regards,

>> Eric Stevens

Regards,

Eric Stevens



Sun, 01 Sep 2013 10:19:37 GMT
 "Finding Atlantis" (Sunday tv program)

Quote:

> Tom McDonald
> > It seems unlikely to me that an Iberian Atlantis would
> >  spawn a sea-faring folk in the Levant.

> Is it any less unlikely than an Eastern Mediterranean/Levantine
> civilization founding an enduring city on the Atlantic sea board of
> Spain?

Abso-{*filter*}ing-lutely.


Sun, 01 Sep 2013 12:51:27 GMT
 "Finding Atlantis" (Sunday tv program)
On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 17:18:00 -0500, in sci.archaeology, Tom McDonald

Quote:

>> On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 15:08:09 +0000, Doug Weller

>>> On Sun, 13 Mar 2011 00:53:05 -0800 (PST), in sci.archaeology, C. Ikehara

>>>> http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/12/us-tsunami-atlantis-idUSTRE...

>>> Looks like they are getting a lot of publicity, but it's concerning that
>>> Freund (whose academic discipline is history, not archaeology - also a
>>> Rabbi) suggests the Atlanteans may have founded civilization

>> I think you may be misrepresenting his statement:

>>    "What if Atlantis was located in Spain and the origin of
>>     civilization didn't happen in the Middle East but happened in
>>     Spain?" Freund said he asked himself. "I think that the Atlanteans
>>     are the parents of the Phoenicians."

>> This is not quite the same as the ideas you attributed to him, unless
>> you believe civilization descended through the Phoenecians.

What I believe doesn't matter, he says that perhaps civilization
originated in Spain, where he places Atlantis. I suspect he is as confused
about the Phoenicians as he is about Atlantis.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
>It seems unlikely to me that an Iberian Atlantis would spawn a sea-faring
>folk in the Levant.

>Also, when I saw the program, I don't recall hearing any discussion of
>dating, though I could have missed it. As you know, Plato's dating of the
>disaster to ca. 9,000 BC is useless, as it would require a powerful Athens,
>not to mention Egypt, to have been in existence millennia before any
>archaeological support for either.

>>> http://westhartford.patch.com/articles/has-a-university-of-hartford-p...].
>>> See also Eric Cline's review of a booklet of his
>>> [http://www.bib-arch.org/reviews/review-digging-through-the-bible.asp].
>>> Freund and his colleagues are advisors to Simcha Jacobovici
>>> [http://robertcargill.com/2011/01/07/eric-cline-reviews-richard-freund/

>>> Doug

>> Regards,

>> Eric Stevens

Note that no archaeology has been involved yet so far as I know, certainly
no excavations.
Doug
--
Doug Weller --
A Director and Moderator of The Hall of Ma'at http://www.hallofmaat.com
Doug's Archaeology Site: http://www.ramtops.co.uk
Amun - co-owner/co-moderator http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Amun/


Sun, 01 Sep 2013 18:31:07 GMT
 "Finding Atlantis" (Sunday tv program)
On Wed, 16 Mar 2011 10:31:07 +0000, Doug Weller

Quote:

>On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 17:18:00 -0500, in sci.archaeology, Tom McDonald


>>> On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 15:08:09 +0000, Doug Weller

>>>> On Sun, 13 Mar 2011 00:53:05 -0800 (PST), in sci.archaeology, C. Ikehara

>>>>> http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/12/us-tsunami-atlantis-idUSTRE...

>>>> Looks like they are getting a lot of publicity, but it's concerning that
>>>> Freund (whose academic discipline is history, not archaeology - also a
>>>> Rabbi) suggests the Atlanteans may have founded civilization

>>> I think you may be misrepresenting his statement:

>>>    "What if Atlantis was located in Spain and the origin of
>>>     civilization didn't happen in the Middle East but happened in
>>>     Spain?" Freund said he asked himself. "I think that the Atlanteans
>>>     are the parents of the Phoenicians."

>>> This is not quite the same as the ideas you attributed to him, unless
>>> you believe civilization descended through the Phoenecians.

>What I believe doesn't matter, he says that perhaps civilization
>originated in Spain, where he places Atlantis. I suspect he is as confused
>about the Phoenicians as he is about Atlantis.

He actually sas, as I quoted above "what if ...". That's not quite the
same as what you are claiming he said.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

>>It seems unlikely to me that an Iberian Atlantis would spawn a sea-faring
>>folk in the Levant.

>>Also, when I saw the program, I don't recall hearing any discussion of
>>dating, though I could have missed it. As you know, Plato's dating of the
>>disaster to ca. 9,000 BC is useless, as it would require a powerful Athens,
>>not to mention Egypt, to have been in existence millennia before any
>>archaeological support for either.

>>>> http://westhartford.patch.com/articles/has-a-university-of-hartford-p...].
>>>> See also Eric Cline's review of a booklet of his
>>>> [http://www.bib-arch.org/reviews/review-digging-through-the-bible.asp].
>>>> Freund and his colleagues are advisors to Simcha Jacobovici
>>>> [http://robertcargill.com/2011/01/07/eric-cline-reviews-richard-freund/

>>>> Doug

>>> Regards,

>>> Eric Stevens

>Note that no archaeology has been involved yet so far as I know, certainly
>no excavations.

From the original citation:

 "The team of archeologists and geologists in 2009 and 2010 used a
  combination of deep-ground radar, digital mapping, and underwater
  technology to survey the site."

Again, at http://tinyurl.com/4qolpqe or

http://thegranbys.patch.com/articles/has-a-university-of-hartford-pro...

 "Since 1995, Freund has been using a technology more commonly used in
  oil and gas exploration to examine sites before excavation.

  "We map the subsurface," he said. "It's like an MRI for the ground."

   Freund and his team brought their equipment to the site during the
area's driest months, August and September, in 2009.

   "By shooting electricity into the ground, we're able to distinguish
    between different types of material," he said."This type of
    technology can map the entire subsurface instead of digging. ...
    It's a form of non-invasive archaeology."

    What the team found in its subsurface mapping was a pattern at
    regular intervals also something that doesn't occur naturally."

It sounds to me that there has been site mapping, sufficient to
identify man-made artifacts. While there may have been no excavations
(although my memory is that two small man-made artifacts are claimed
to have been found) there appears to be grounds for acknowledging the
occurrence of the early stages of archaeology.

Regards,

Eric Stevens



Mon, 02 Sep 2013 05:57:31 GMT
 "Finding Atlantis" (Sunday tv program)

Quote:
> On Wed, 16 Mar 2011 10:31:07 +0000, Doug Weller

>> On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 17:18:00 -0500, in sci.archaeology, Tom McDonald


>>>> On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 15:08:09 +0000, Doug Weller

>>>>> On Sun, 13 Mar 2011 00:53:05 -0800 (PST), in sci.archaeology, C. Ikehara

>>>>>> http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/12/us-tsunami-atlantis-idUSTRE...

>>>>> Looks like they are getting a lot of publicity, but it's concerning that
>>>>> Freund (whose academic discipline is history, not archaeology - also a
>>>>> Rabbi) suggests the Atlanteans may have founded civilization

>>>> I think you may be misrepresenting his statement:

>>>>     "What if Atlantis was located in Spain and the origin of
>>>>      civilization didn't happen in the Middle East but happened in
>>>>      Spain?" Freund said he asked himself. "I think that the Atlanteans
>>>>      are the parents of the Phoenicians."

>>>> This is not quite the same as the ideas you attributed to him, unless
>>>> you believe civilization descended through the Phoenecians.

>> What I believe doesn't matter, he says that perhaps civilization
>> originated in Spain, where he places Atlantis. I suspect he is as confused
>> about the Phoenicians as he is about Atlantis.

> He actually sas, as I quoted above "what if ...". That's not quite the
> same as what you are claiming he said.

>>> It seems unlikely to me that an Iberian Atlantis would spawn a sea-faring
>>> folk in the Levant.

>>> Also, when I saw the program, I don't recall hearing any discussion of
>>> dating, though I could have missed it. As you know, Plato's dating of the
>>> disaster to ca. 9,000 BC is useless, as it would require a powerful Athens,
>>> not to mention Egypt, to have been in existence millennia before any
>>> archaeological support for either.

>>>>> http://westhartford.patch.com/articles/has-a-university-of-hartford-p...].
>>>>> See also Eric Cline's review of a booklet of his
>>>>> [http://www.bib-arch.org/reviews/review-digging-through-the-bible.asp].
>>>>> Freund and his colleagues are advisors to Simcha Jacobovici
>>>>> [http://robertcargill.com/2011/01/07/eric-cline-reviews-richard-freund/

>>>>> Doug

>>>> Regards,

>>>> Eric Stevens

>> Note that no archaeology has been involved yet so far as I know, certainly
>> no excavations.

>  From the original citation:

>   "The team of archeologists and geologists in 2009 and 2010 used a
>    combination of deep-ground radar, digital mapping, and underwater
>    technology to survey the site."

> Again, at http://tinyurl.com/4qolpqe or

> http://thegranbys.patch.com/articles/has-a-university-of-hartford-pro...

>   "Since 1995, Freund has been using a technology more commonly used in
>    oil and gas exploration to examine sites before excavation.

>    "We map the subsurface," he said. "It's like an MRI for the ground."

>     Freund and his team brought their equipment to the site during the
> area's driest months, August and September, in 2009.

>     "By shooting electricity into the ground, we're able to distinguish
>      between different types of material," he said."This type of
>      technology can map the entire subsurface instead of digging. ...
>      It's a form of non-invasive archaeology."

>      What the team found in its subsurface mapping was a pattern at
>      regular intervals ??? also something that doesn't occur naturally."

> It sounds to me that there has been site mapping, sufficient to
> identify man-made artifacts. While there may have been no excavations
> (although my memory is that two small man-made artifacts are claimed
> to have been found) there appears to be grounds for acknowledging the
> occurrence of the early stages of archaeology.

The on-land sub-surface mapping requires walking grids with the equipment. I
don't know whether that was when they found the figures (which to me looked
Roman or Celtic), or whether they did separate walking surveys.

It will be interesting to see whether they actually do some digging there,
and do it in layers rather than just back-hoe down to the possible methane
level.

--
Tom



Mon, 02 Sep 2013 06:09:10 GMT
 "Finding Atlantis" (Sunday tv program)
On Wed, 16 Mar 2011 17:09:10 -0500, Tom McDonald

Quote:


>> On Wed, 16 Mar 2011 10:31:07 +0000, Doug Weller

>>> On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 17:18:00 -0500, in sci.archaeology, Tom McDonald


>>>>> On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 15:08:09 +0000, Doug Weller

>>>>>> On Sun, 13 Mar 2011 00:53:05 -0800 (PST), in sci.archaeology, C. Ikehara

>>>>>>> http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/12/us-tsunami-atlantis-idUSTRE...

>>>>>> Looks like they are getting a lot of publicity, but it's concerning that
>>>>>> Freund (whose academic discipline is history, not archaeology - also a
>>>>>> Rabbi) suggests the Atlanteans may have founded civilization

>>>>> I think you may be misrepresenting his statement:

>>>>>     "What if Atlantis was located in Spain and the origin of
>>>>>      civilization didn't happen in the Middle East but happened in
>>>>>      Spain?" Freund said he asked himself. "I think that the Atlanteans
>>>>>      are the parents of the Phoenicians."

>>>>> This is not quite the same as the ideas you attributed to him, unless
>>>>> you believe civilization descended through the Phoenecians.

>>> What I believe doesn't matter, he says that perhaps civilization
>>> originated in Spain, where he places Atlantis. I suspect he is as confused
>>> about the Phoenicians as he is about Atlantis.

>> He actually sas, as I quoted above "what if ...". That's not quite the
>> same as what you are claiming he said.

>>>> It seems unlikely to me that an Iberian Atlantis would spawn a sea-faring
>>>> folk in the Levant.

>>>> Also, when I saw the program, I don't recall hearing any discussion of
>>>> dating, though I could have missed it. As you know, Plato's dating of the
>>>> disaster to ca. 9,000 BC is useless, as it would require a powerful Athens,
>>>> not to mention Egypt, to have been in existence millennia before any
>>>> archaeological support for either.

>>>>>> http://westhartford.patch.com/articles/has-a-university-of-hartford-p...].
>>>>>> See also Eric Cline's review of a booklet of his
>>>>>> [http://www.bib-arch.org/reviews/review-digging-through-the-bible.asp].
>>>>>> Freund and his colleagues are advisors to Simcha Jacobovici
>>>>>> [http://robertcargill.com/2011/01/07/eric-cline-reviews-richard-freund/

>>>>>> Doug

>>>>> Regards,

>>>>> Eric Stevens

>>> Note that no archaeology has been involved yet so far as I know, certainly
>>> no excavations.

>>  From the original citation:

>>   "The team of archeologists and geologists in 2009 and 2010 used a
>>    combination of deep-ground radar, digital mapping, and underwater
>>    technology to survey the site."

>> Again, at http://tinyurl.com/4qolpqe or

>> http://thegranbys.patch.com/articles/has-a-university-of-hartford-pro...

>>   "Since 1995, Freund has been using a technology more commonly used in
>>    oil and gas exploration to examine sites before excavation.

>>    "We map the subsurface," he said. "It's like an MRI for the ground."

>>     Freund and his team brought their equipment to the site during the
>> area's driest months, August and September, in 2009.

>>     "By shooting electricity into the ground, we're able to distinguish
>>      between different types of material," he said."This type of
>>      technology can map the entire subsurface instead of digging. ...
>>      It's a form of non-invasive archaeology."

>>      What the team found in its subsurface mapping was a pattern at
>>      regular intervals also something that doesn't occur naturally."

>> It sounds to me that there has been site mapping, sufficient to
>> identify man-made artifacts. While there may have been no excavations
>> (although my memory is that two small man-made artifacts are claimed
>> to have been found) there appears to be grounds for acknowledging the
>> occurrence of the early stages of archaeology.

>The on-land sub-surface mapping requires walking grids with the equipment. I
>don't know whether that was when they found the figures (which to me looked
>Roman or Celtic), or whether they did separate walking surveys.

>It will be interesting to see whether they actually do some digging there,
>and do it in layers rather than just back-hoe down to the possible methane
>level.

If the rings are as large as claimed I would expect that some initial
trenching would be in order.

Regards,

Eric Stevens



Mon, 02 Sep 2013 06:55:03 GMT
 "Finding Atlantis" (Sunday tv program)
On Thu, 17 Mar 2011 11:55:03 +1300, Eric Stevens

Quote:

>On Wed, 16 Mar 2011 17:09:10 -0500, Tom McDonald


>>> On Wed, 16 Mar 2011 10:31:07 +0000, Doug Weller

>>>> On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 17:18:00 -0500, in sci.archaeology, Tom McDonald


>>>>>> On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 15:08:09 +0000, Doug Weller

>>>>>>> On Sun, 13 Mar 2011 00:53:05 -0800 (PST), in sci.archaeology, C. Ikehara

>>>>>>>> http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/12/us-tsunami-atlantis-idUSTRE...

>>>>>>> Looks like they are getting a lot of publicity, but it's concerning that
>>>>>>> Freund (whose academic discipline is history, not archaeology - also a
>>>>>>> Rabbi) suggests the Atlanteans may have founded civilization

>>>>>> I think you may be misrepresenting his statement:

>>>>>>     "What if Atlantis was located in Spain and the origin of
>>>>>>      civilization didn't happen in the Middle East but happened in
>>>>>>      Spain?" Freund said he asked himself. "I think that the Atlanteans
>>>>>>      are the parents of the Phoenicians."

>>>>>> This is not quite the same as the ideas you attributed to him, unless
>>>>>> you believe civilization descended through the Phoenecians.

>>>> What I believe doesn't matter, he says that perhaps civilization
>>>> originated in Spain, where he places Atlantis. I suspect he is as confused
>>>> about the Phoenicians as he is about Atlantis.

>>> He actually sas, as I quoted above "what if ...". That's not quite the
>>> same as what you are claiming he said.

>>>>> It seems unlikely to me that an Iberian Atlantis would spawn a sea-faring
>>>>> folk in the Levant.

>>>>> Also, when I saw the program, I don't recall hearing any discussion of
>>>>> dating, though I could have missed it. As you know, Plato's dating of the
>>>>> disaster to ca. 9,000 BC is useless, as it would require a powerful Athens,
>>>>> not to mention Egypt, to have been in existence millennia before any
>>>>> archaeological support for either.

>>>>>>> http://westhartford.patch.com/articles/has-a-university-of-hartford-p...].
>>>>>>> See also Eric Cline's review of a booklet of his
>>>>>>> [http://www.bib-arch.org/reviews/review-digging-through-the-bible.asp].
>>>>>>> Freund and his colleagues are advisors to Simcha Jacobovici
>>>>>>> [http://robertcargill.com/2011/01/07/eric-cline-reviews-richard-freund/

>>>>>>> Doug

>>>>>> Regards,

>>>>>> Eric Stevens

>>>> Note that no archaeology has been involved yet so far as I know, certainly
>>>> no excavations.

>>>  From the original citation:

>>>   "The team of archeologists and geologists in 2009 and 2010 used a
>>>    combination of deep-ground radar, digital mapping, and underwater
>>>    technology to survey the site."

>>> Again, at http://tinyurl.com/4qolpqe or

>>> http://thegranbys.patch.com/articles/has-a-university-of-hartford-pro...

>>>   "Since 1995, Freund has been using a technology more commonly used in
>>>    oil and gas exploration to examine sites before excavation.

>>>    "We map the subsurface," he said. "It's like an MRI for the ground."

>>>     Freund and his team brought their equipment to the site during the
>>> area's driest months, August and September, in 2009.

>>>     "By shooting electricity into the ground, we're able to distinguish
>>>      between different types of material," he said."This type of
>>>      technology can map the entire subsurface instead of digging. ...
>>>      It's a form of non-invasive archaeology."

>>>      What the team found in its subsurface mapping was a pattern at
>>>      regular intervals ??? also something that doesn't occur naturally."

>>> It sounds to me that there has been site mapping, sufficient to
>>> identify man-made artifacts. While there may have been no excavations
>>> (although my memory is that two small man-made artifacts are claimed
>>> to have been found) there appears to be grounds for acknowledging the
>>> occurrence of the early stages of archaeology.

>>The on-land sub-surface mapping requires walking grids with the equipment. I
>>don't know whether that was when they found the figures (which to me looked
>>Roman or Celtic), or whether they did separate walking surveys.

>>It will be interesting to see whether they actually do some digging there,
>>and do it in layers rather than just back-hoe down to the possible methane
>>level.

>If the rings are as large as claimed I would expect that some initial
>trenching would be in order.

I take that back. In view of the swampy nature of the ground, test
bores  may be more appropriate.

Regards,

Eric Stevens



Mon, 02 Sep 2013 12:07:20 GMT
 "Finding Atlantis" (Sunday tv program)
Thera Santorini is Atlantis, it exploded in 1514bc
900 years before 614bc Salon


Mon, 02 Sep 2013 18:35:57 GMT
 "Finding Atlantis" (Sunday tv program)
On Thu, 17 Mar 2011 03:35:57 -0700 (PDT), Elijahovah

Quote:

>Thera Santorini is Atlantis, it exploded in 1514bc
>900 years before 614bc Salon

No point in exploring the Spanish site then, is there.

Regards,

Eric Stevens



Tue, 03 Sep 2013 04:59:11 GMT
 "Finding Atlantis" (Sunday tv program)


Quote:


>>On Thu, 17 Mar 2011 03:35:57 -0700 (PDT), Elijahovah

>>>Thera Santorini is Atlantis, it exploded in 1514bc
>>>900 years before 614bc Salon

>>No point in exploring the Spanish site then, is there.

>Nope, not really.  NOR all the other nonsensical sites.

I don't think it is a nonsensical site but I'm not yet convinced that
it is Atlantis.

http://loststates.blogspot.com/2011/03/atlantis-coordinates-revealed-...
gives a brief overview of the background. While I am sure that I would
trust Freund with a bee in a bonnet, it does seem from the work of
Juan Villar as-Robles  that there is something there to study. The bay
is just north of Cadiz and Google earth shows that this is the lowest
part of the surrounding swamp plain. If there is some kind of
previously unknown manmade structure there, I think it should be
studied. We can argue about what it is and isn't when we know a bit
more about it.

Regards,

Eric Stevens



Tue, 03 Sep 2013 10:18:27 GMT
 
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