White fillings vs. silver fillings 
Author Message
 White fillings vs. silver fillings

I just had a dental check-up and was informed that I have three, very small
cavities. The dentist explained that if he fills them with white fillings,
they only need to carve out a small chunk of the tooth, but with silver
fillings a much larger chunk must come out.

I have heard lots of stories about dentists taking advantage of insurance or
trying to sell something that is not necessary. i'm not saying that is what
is going on here, I just don't know enough about the different fillings to
make an educated decision. The out-of-pocket expense is $225 more with the
white fillings, and the dentist actually said if I choose silver we should
wait to see if they get bigger.

Any input on this subject?

Hi Dan,

WAIT!!!  I believe the dentist may be
talking about minimally invasive dentistry.  
It is kind of like a physician doing
exploratory surgery.  If they find
something they remove it, if they
don't they just close you up.  In this
case they close it up with a bonded
composite.  However, IMHO, if its not
big enough to  justify a very conservative
amalgam restoration, it probably is not
there.

To better then minimal invasive dentistry,
                       non-invasive dentistry,

Stan Goloskov



Tue, 05 Jun 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 White fillings vs. silver fillings
Hi Dan,

Quote:

>I have three, very small cavities. The dentist explained that if he fills
>them with white fillings, they only need to carve out a small chunk
>of the tooth, but with silver fillings a much larger chunk must come out.

So far correct.

Quote:
>The out-of-pocket expense is $225 more with the white fillings, and
>the dentist actually said if I choose silver we should wait to see if
>they get bigger. Any input on this subject?

Sure sounds strange... if you want white (MORE expensive) fillings
you get them; if you go for silver fillings you don't need them...

Basically, if you do not need any fillings you do not need white ones
either!!!

There could, however, be a valid explaination (to this paradox):
the dentist is not sure wheather the cavities need to be filled or
not (that's okay!) at this point. It depends on if they are active,
that is if they are getting bigger or not. If you go for the white ones
there will not be much damage to stop any decay; wheather it is there
or not. Silver fillings need much more of healthy tooth tissues removed
and your dentist want to 100% sure the cavitites are active before he
does that. Cavities might heal, maybe they will or already have. The
dentist cannot see that on x-rays taken at one time but need to compare
different x-rays over period of time.

Maybe you should suggest to him a re-evaluation within six months or so
(if he doesn't think you risk pass the point for white fillings by then) in
order to avoid any the larger silver fillings where more tissue need to be
removed. During that time profylactic measures may be the difference
between 'to drill or not to drill'.

Bye for now,
Hans Lennros DDS.



Tue, 05 Jun 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 White fillings vs. silver fillings
You could come to Missouri.  I would fill three small composite fillings
for less than $225 *total* (about $50 for a one surface with air
abrasion if appropriate).  I'll never place another amalgam in my life.

SWF DDS

BTW..Hans advice is valid (IMHO).

Quote:

> >The out-of-pocket expense is $225 more with the white fillings, and
> >the dentist actually said if I choose silver we should wait to see if
> >they get bigger.

> Maybe you should suggest to him a re-evaluation within six months or so
> (if he doesn't think you risk pass the point for white fillings by then) in
> order to avoid any the larger silver fillings where more tissue need to be
> removed. During that time profylactic measures may be the difference
> between 'to drill or not to drill'.

> Bye for now,
> Hans Lennros DDS.



Tue, 05 Jun 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 White fillings vs. silver fillings
The grooves and pits that form the landscape of your teeth are prone to
collect stain and possibly decay. Due to the effects of fluoride, it has
been proposed that the enamel is much harder and resistant to collapse
following undermining by the decay of the dentin. (material under the
enamel)

Many times "sealants" are placed over these grooves to "plug" them up.
They are bonded to the tooth by means of a micromechanical union between a
resin and the enamel. This treatment is loosing favor with me at present.

The question is: when one places a sealant, is decay being sealed inside the
groove?
    If so, what happens if the seal developes a leak along one of its edges?

So how about remove the decay and stain from the groove, making it slightly
larger, then replacing it with a flowable bonded resin filling material.
At my school these were called preventive composites. A "new?" concept.
A lecture I attended on air abrasion showed this technique.

Traditional amalgam fillings merely fill the space that is created by the
dentist:
 We must remove healthy tooth ( to get to the decay) and the decay itself.
In order for the amalgam fillings to stay where they're put the dentist must
rely on friction.

Also consider: the larger the filling is, the greater the likelyhood of the
tooth fracturing and needing a crown.

I commend your dentist for giving you treatment options, perhaps he or she
could have explained it to you more so that you wouldn't be mistrusting.

Merry Christmas!

Rob Suzuki BSc, DDS

PS  I'd rather do/have a small filling than a large one any day.



Wed, 06 Jun 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 White fillings vs. silver fillings
The grooves and pits that form the landscape of your teeth are prone to
collect stain and possibly decay. Due to the effects of fluoride, it has
been proposed that the enamel is much harder and resistant to collapse
following undermining by the decay of the dentin. (material under the
enamel)

Many times "sealants" are placed over these grooves to "plug" them up.
They are bonded to the tooth by means of a micromechanical union between a
resin and the enamel. This treatment is loosing favor with me at present.

The question is: when one places a sealant, is decay being sealed inside the
groove?
    If so, what happens if the seal developes a leak along one of its edges?

So how about remove the decay and stain from the groove, making it slightly
larger, then replacing it with a flowable bonded resin filling material.
At my school these were called preventive composites. A "new?" concept.
A lecture I attended on air abrasion showed this technique.

Traditional amalgam fillings merely fill the space that is created by the
dentist:
 We must remove healthy tooth ( to get to the decay) and the decay itself.
In order for the amalgam fillings to stay where they're put the dentist must
rely on friction.

Also consider: the larger the filling is, the greater the likelyhood of the
tooth fracturing and needing a crown.

I commend your dentist for giving you treatment options, perhaps he or she
could have explained it to you more so that you wouldn't be mistrusting.

Merry Christmas!

Rob Suzuki BSc, DDS

PS  I'd rather do/have a small filling than a large one any day.



Wed, 06 Jun 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 White fillings vs. silver fillings
The grooves and pits that form the landscape of your teeth are prone to
collect stain and possibly decay. Due to the effects of fluoride, it has
been proposed that the enamel is much harder and resistant to collapse
following undermining by the decay of the dentin. (material under the
enamel)

Many times "sealants" are placed over these grooves to "plug" them up.
They are bonded to the tooth by means of a micromechanical union between a
resin and the enamel. This treatment is loosing favor with me at present.

The question is: when one places a sealant, is decay being sealed inside the
groove?
    If so, what happens if the seal developes a leak along one of its edges?

So how about remove the decay and stain from the groove, making it slightly
larger, then replacing it with a flowable bonded resin filling material.
At my school these were called preventive composites. A "new?" concept.
A lecture I attended on air abrasion showed this technique.

Traditional amalgam fillings merely fill the space that is created by the
dentist:
 We must remove healthy tooth ( to get to the decay) and the decay itself.
In order for the amalgam fillings to stay where they're put the dentist must
rely on friction.

Also consider: the larger the filling is, the greater the likelyhood of the
tooth fracturing and needing a crown.

I commend your dentist for giving you treatment options, perhaps he or she
could have explained it to you more so that you wouldn't be mistrusting.

Merry Christmas!

Rob Suzuki BSc, DDS

PS  I'd rather do/have a small filling than a large one any day.



Wed, 06 Jun 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 White fillings vs. silver fillings
Hi Rob,

Quote:

>The grooves and pits that form the landscape of your teeth are prone to
>collect stain and possibly decay. Due to the effects of fluoride, it has
>been proposed that the enamel is much harder and resistant to collapse
>following undermining by the decay of the dentin. (material under the
>enamel)

Excellent explanation Rob, the problem is this
theory as far a I know has only been proposed
in throw away journals.  I haven't seen it in peer
reviewed or refereed journals as of yet.

Quote:
>Many times "sealants" are placed over these grooves to "plug" them up.
>They are bonded to the tooth by means of a micromechanical union >between a
>resin and the enamel. This treatment is loosing favor with me at present.
>The question is: when one places a sealant, is decay being sealed inside >the
>groove?

Again well stated.  The thought years ago
was that even placing sealants over small
carious lesions would lead to arresting the
decay process by removing the cooking.net">food source.
Another theory never proven or disproven.

Quote:
>If so, what happens if the seal developes a leak along one of its edges?

True, but remember this seal is the same
one used for flowable composites.  If the
seal don't FIT, you don't protect the PIT.

Quote:
>So how about remove the decay and stain from the groove, making it >slightly
>larger, then replacing it with a flowable bonded resin filling material.
>At my school these were called preventive composites. A "new?" concept.
>A lecture I attended on air abrasion showed this technique.

Although, I believe there may be merit
here, I worry that the concept has been
developed by the companies making the air
abrasion units.  In essence lack of quality research,
with vested financial interests.

Quote:
>Traditional amalgam fillings merely fill the space that is created by the
>dentist:

True, but so do composites.  

Quote:
>We must remove healthy tooth ( to get to the decay) and the decay itself.

True but the same is true of composites.

Quote:
>In order for the amalgam fillings to stay where they're put the dentist >must
>rely on friction.

True, but one of the major reasons we etch, prime
and bond is the increase surface area
(ie. increase friction).

Quote:
>Also consider: the larger the filling is, the greater the likelyhood of the
>tooth fracturing and needing a crown.

When it comes to
conventional size restorations.  Personally I
feel this may be one of the best attributes of
bonded composite restorations.  However, we
are posting about extremely small conservative
restorations.  How many pit amalgams have led to
fracture teeth?  My guess are extremely few.

Quote:
>PS  I'd rather do/have a small filling than a

large one any day.

I am in accord.  The biggest problem is whether
the theory of fluoride strengthen enamel in fact
behaves in the manner suggested.  If not, opening
suspected pits and fissures all the time may in
fact be overtreatment.  

Happy Hollidays,

Stan Goloskov



Thu, 07 Jun 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 
 [ 8 post ] 

 Relevant Pages 

1. Welfare dental coverage / amalgam fillings vs white fillings

2. Pain after fillings replaced with white fillings

3. Need Advice On Plastic/Composite Fillings vs. Silver

4. Silver vs. Amalgam fillings

5. New filling causing problems with old filling?

6. Multiple Sclerosis and Silver fillings...

7. Silver fillings taste

8. Silver fillings taste

9. FDA Issues Precautionary Note On Silver Fillings

10. Silver Amalgam Fillings

11. silver fillings and root canals are dangerous

12. amalgams/silver fillings


 
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software