someone please help me!! 
Author Message
 someone please help me!!

okay, i want to enroll to university in the US to study dentistry for fall
2002. But being a foreigner (British) i'm confused by your (American)
education system. Now, the thing i dont get is do I apply to an
undergraduate college, or a graduate college (like the Harvard School of
Dental Medicine). I'm now 17 and i'm studying A-levels in Bio, Chem, Maths,
and Art; but I dont know what 17 year olds are studying in America? (Alevels
/ degrees/ baccalaureetes )

So basically what i would like to know is a) do i apply for graduate or
undergraduate

                                                    and b) what is the US
equivalent of what I'm studying now



Wed, 28 May 2003 03:19:55 GMT
 someone please help me!!
PS Thanks to any one that can help

James


Quote:
> okay, i want to enroll to university in the US to study dentistry for fall
> 2002. But being a foreigner (British) i'm confused by your (American)
> education system. Now, the thing i dont get is do I apply to an
> undergraduate college, or a graduate college (like the Harvard School of
> Dental Medicine). I'm now 17 and i'm studying A-levels in Bio, Chem,
Maths,
> and Art; but I dont know what 17 year olds are studying in America?
(Alevels
> / degrees/ baccalaureetes )

> So basically what i would like to know is a) do i apply for graduate or
> undergraduate

>                                                     and b) what is the US
> equivalent of what I'm studying now



Wed, 28 May 2003 03:23:43 GMT
 someone please help me!!
James:

You need to complete the prerequisite courses for admission to dental school
first; this will essentially require you to complete an undergraduate
baccalaureate degree. I do not know the equivalent grade levels of U.S. vs. U.K.
college courses, but most freshman entrants into dental school are about age 22.
Unless you're a very quick study, you'll probably need to take some additional
courses in order to fulfill the course prerequisites. Also keep in mind that
many courses taken outside the U.S. are not considered equivalent, and all your
college-level courses may not be credited towards your prerequisite. You will
need to apply for undergraduate courses..

Mark Bornfeld DDS

Quote:

> okay, i want to enroll to university in the US to study dentistry for fall
> 2002. But being a foreigner (British) i'm confused by your (American)
> education system. Now, the thing i dont get is do I apply to an
> undergraduate college, or a graduate college (like the Harvard School of
> Dental Medicine). I'm now 17 and i'm studying A-levels in Bio, Chem, Maths,
> and Art; but I dont know what 17 year olds are studying in America? (Alevels
> / degrees/ baccalaureetes )

> So basically what i would like to know is a) do i apply for graduate or
> undergraduate

>                                                     and b) what is the US
> equivalent of what I'm studying now

--
Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
Brooklyn, NY
718-258-5001
http://www.dentaltwins.com


Wed, 28 May 2003 03:41:54 GMT
 someone please help me!!
okay, Ive not quite got this.

In order to be able to become a registered dentist i HAVE to go to dental
school. (by the way how long is this?) So once I get a baccalaureete degree
(which subject would this be in also?) i then go to Dental school for say 4
years - thats 8 years!!

In the UK all we have to do is get the required A-levels in sciences, maths,
etc; and then to uni for five years studying dentistry and then one year
pre-registration, and thats it. Are u sure there isnt a shorter route to go.

Thanks for the help

James

also fyi - ive contacted harvard and they recognise A-levels as pre-req
courses



Quote:
> James:

> You need to complete the prerequisite courses for admission to dental
school
> first; this will essentially require you to complete an undergraduate
> baccalaureate degree. I do not know the equivalent grade levels of U.S.
vs. U.K.
> college courses, but most freshman entrants into dental school are about
age 22.
> Unless you're a very quick study, you'll probably need to take some
additional
> courses in order to fulfill the course prerequisites. Also keep in mind
that
> many courses taken outside the U.S. are not considered equivalent, and all
your
> college-level courses may not be credited towards your prerequisite. You
will
> need to apply for undergraduate courses..

> Mark Bornfeld DDS


> > okay, i want to enroll to university in the US to study dentistry for
fall
> > 2002. But being a foreigner (British) i'm confused by your (American)
> > education system. Now, the thing i dont get is do I apply to an
> > undergraduate college, or a graduate college (like the Harvard School of
> > Dental Medicine). I'm now 17 and i'm studying A-levels in Bio, Chem,
Maths,
> > and Art; but I dont know what 17 year olds are studying in America?
(Alevels
> > / degrees/ baccalaureetes )

> > So basically what i would like to know is a) do i apply for graduate or
> > undergraduate

> >                                                     and b) what is the
US
> > equivalent of what I'm studying now

> --
> Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
> Brooklyn, NY
> 718-258-5001
> http://www.dentaltwins.com



Wed, 28 May 2003 04:55:40 GMT
 someone please help me!!
James--

        That's about right.  When I went to dental school, it was theoretically
possible to take all the required undergrad courses in less than 4 years, but
not easy.  And the more qualified dental school candidates mostly had
baccalaureate degrees.  There may be some combined BS/DDS programs offered by
some schools which may allow a DDS in less than 8 years.  Anyone closer to
what's going on in the schools out there who knows of any such programs?

Steve

Quote:

> okay, Ive not quite got this.

> In order to be able to become a registered dentist i HAVE to go to dental
> school. (by the way how long is this?) So once I get a baccalaureete degree
> (which subject would this be in also?) i then go to Dental school for say 4
> years - thats 8 years!!

> In the UK all we have to do is get the required A-levels in sciences, maths,
> etc; and then to uni for five years studying dentistry and then one year
> pre-registration, and thats it. Are u sure there isnt a shorter route to go.

> Thanks for the help

> James

> also fyi - ive contacted harvard and they recognise A-levels as pre-req
> courses



> > James:

> > You need to complete the prerequisite courses for admission to dental
> school
> > first; this will essentially require you to complete an undergraduate
> > baccalaureate degree. I do not know the equivalent grade levels of U.S.
> vs. U.K.
> > college courses, but most freshman entrants into dental school are about
> age 22.
> > Unless you're a very quick study, you'll probably need to take some
> additional
> > courses in order to fulfill the course prerequisites. Also keep in mind
> that
> > many courses taken outside the U.S. are not considered equivalent, and all
> your
> > college-level courses may not be credited towards your prerequisite. You
> will
> > need to apply for undergraduate courses..

> > Mark Bornfeld DDS


> > > okay, i want to enroll to university in the US to study dentistry for
> fall
> > > 2002. But being a foreigner (British) i'm confused by your (American)
> > > education system. Now, the thing i dont get is do I apply to an
> > > undergraduate college, or a graduate college (like the Harvard School of
> > > Dental Medicine). I'm now 17 and i'm studying A-levels in Bio, Chem,
> Maths,
> > > and Art; but I dont know what 17 year olds are studying in America?
> (Alevels
> > > / degrees/ baccalaureetes )

> > > So basically what i would like to know is a) do i apply for graduate or
> > > undergraduate

> > >                                                     and b) what is the
> US
> > > equivalent of what I'm studying now

> > --
> > Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
> > Brooklyn, NY
> > 718-258-5001
> > http://www.dentaltwins.com



Wed, 28 May 2003 06:22:58 GMT
 someone please help me!!

Quote:

>okay, Ive not quite got this.

>In order to be able to become a registered dentist i HAVE to go to dental
>school. (by the way how long is this?) So once I get a baccalaureete degree
>(which subject would this be in also?) i then go to Dental school for say 4
>years - thats 8 years!!

>In the UK all we have to do is get the required A-levels in sciences,
maths,
>etc; and then to uni for five years studying dentistry and then one year
>pre-registration, and thats it. Are u sure there isnt a shorter route to
go.

It sounds to me like you have 6 years after A-levels.  As Steve sain, in
North America, its at least 7 and usually 8 years.  I only did 6 years, but
pretty much all schools now require at least a 3- and usually 4- year
undergraduate degree.

Quote:
>Thanks for the help

>James

>also fyi - ive contacted harvard and they recognise A-levels as pre-req
>courses

James,

I am curious as to why you would want to go to Harvard for dental school.
If you are concerned about time, its 5 years to get your dental degree from
Harvard (unless things have changed).  Also, there is a heavy research
component to the program.  Many of its students go on to be researchers,
faculty, etc.  Plus, it was over $30K tuition/year 5 years ago (again,
unless things have changed).  Fill us in.

J Suljak DDS

Quote:



>> James:

>> You need to complete the prerequisite courses for admission to dental
>school
>> first; this will essentially require you to complete an undergraduate
>> baccalaureate degree. I do not know the equivalent grade levels of U.S.
>vs. U.K.
>> college courses, but most freshman entrants into dental school are about
>age 22.
>> Unless you're a very quick study, you'll probably need to take some
>additional
>> courses in order to fulfill the course prerequisites. Also keep in mind
>that
>> many courses taken outside the U.S. are not considered equivalent, and
all
>your
>> college-level courses may not be credited towards your prerequisite. You
>will
>> need to apply for undergraduate courses..

>> Mark Bornfeld DDS


>> > okay, i want to enroll to university in the US to study dentistry for
>fall
>> > 2002. But being a foreigner (British) i'm confused by your (American)
>> > education system. Now, the thing i dont get is do I apply to an
>> > undergraduate college, or a graduate college (like the Harvard School
of
>> > Dental Medicine). I'm now 17 and i'm studying A-levels in Bio, Chem,
>Maths,
>> > and Art; but I dont know what 17 year olds are studying in America?
>(Alevels
>> > / degrees/ baccalaureetes )

>> > So basically what i would like to know is a) do i apply for graduate or
>> > undergraduate

>> >                                                     and b) what is the
>US
>> > equivalent of what I'm studying now

>> --
>> Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
>> Brooklyn, NY
>> 718-258-5001
>> http://www.dentaltwins.com



Wed, 28 May 2003 11:24:57 GMT
 someone please help me!!
James--

        What are A-level courses in science and math?  How long does that take?
What is pre-registration? (Can I presume it is equivalent to a hospital-based
internship in the states?

Steve

Quote:

> okay, Ive not quite got this.

> In order to be able to become a registered dentist i HAVE to go to dental
> school. (by the way how long is this?) So once I get a baccalaureete degree
> (which subject would this be in also?) i then go to Dental school for say 4
> years - thats 8 years!!

> In the UK all we have to do is get the required A-levels in sciences, maths,
> etc; and then to uni for five years studying dentistry and then one year
> pre-registration, and thats it. Are u sure there isnt a shorter route to go.

> Thanks for the help

> James

> also fyi - ive contacted harvard and they recognise A-levels as pre-req
> courses



> > James:

> > You need to complete the prerequisite courses for admission to dental
> school
> > first; this will essentially require you to complete an undergraduate
> > baccalaureate degree. I do not know the equivalent grade levels of U.S.
> vs. U.K.
> > college courses, but most freshman entrants into dental school are about
> age 22.
> > Unless you're a very quick study, you'll probably need to take some
> additional
> > courses in order to fulfill the course prerequisites. Also keep in mind
> that
> > many courses taken outside the U.S. are not considered equivalent, and all
> your
> > college-level courses may not be credited towards your prerequisite. You
> will
> > need to apply for undergraduate courses..

> > Mark Bornfeld DDS


> > > okay, i want to enroll to university in the US to study dentistry for
> fall
> > > 2002. But being a foreigner (British) i'm confused by your (American)
> > > education system. Now, the thing i dont get is do I apply to an
> > > undergraduate college, or a graduate college (like the Harvard School of
> > > Dental Medicine). I'm now 17 and i'm studying A-levels in Bio, Chem,
> Maths,
> > > and Art; but I dont know what 17 year olds are studying in America?
> (Alevels
> > > / degrees/ baccalaureetes )

> > > So basically what i would like to know is a) do i apply for graduate or
> > > undergraduate

> > >                                                     and b) what is the
> US
> > > equivalent of what I'm studying now

> > --
> > Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
> > Brooklyn, NY
> > 718-258-5001
> > http://www.dentaltwins.com



Wed, 28 May 2003 11:44:12 GMT
 someone please help me!!
James and others :-)

In UK, the degress is BDS (not DDS as america) - standing for batchelors of
dental surgery, and after 5 years u are a qualified dentist, and a
registered one at that. You do a year of vocational training (which is not
pre-reg as you are already a registered dentist), which is only mandatory if
you want to work in practice as a NHS dentist.. in other words u dont have
to do it if you want to work in hospital, or work in private practice. Most
people eventually do VT

Hope this has made the UK system clearer.

Regards

Dr S H Dattani BDS


Quote:
> James--

>         What are A-level courses in science and math?  How long does that
take?
> What is pre-registration? (Can I presume it is equivalent to a
hospital-based
> internship in the states?

> Steve


> > okay, Ive not quite got this.

> > In order to be able to become a registered dentist i HAVE to go to
dental
> > school. (by the way how long is this?) So once I get a baccalaureete
degree
> > (which subject would this be in also?) i then go to Dental school for
say 4
> > years - thats 8 years!!

> > In the UK all we have to do is get the required A-levels in sciences,
maths,
> > etc; and then to uni for five years studying dentistry and then one year
> > pre-registration, and thats it. Are u sure there isnt a shorter route to
go.

> > Thanks for the help

> > James

> > also fyi - ive contacted harvard and they recognise A-levels as pre-req
> > courses



> > > James:

> > > You need to complete the prerequisite courses for admission to dental
> > school
> > > first; this will essentially require you to complete an undergraduate
> > > baccalaureate degree. I do not know the equivalent grade levels of
U.S.
> > vs. U.K.
> > > college courses, but most freshman entrants into dental school are
about
> > age 22.
> > > Unless you're a very quick study, you'll probably need to take some
> > additional
> > > courses in order to fulfill the course prerequisites. Also keep in
mind
> > that
> > > many courses taken outside the U.S. are not considered equivalent, and
all
> > your
> > > college-level courses may not be credited towards your prerequisite.
You
> > will
> > > need to apply for undergraduate courses..

> > > Mark Bornfeld DDS


> > > > okay, i want to enroll to university in the US to study dentistry
for
> > fall
> > > > 2002. But being a foreigner (British) i'm confused by your
(American)
> > > > education system. Now, the thing i dont get is do I apply to an
> > > > undergraduate college, or a graduate college (like the Harvard
School of
> > > > Dental Medicine). I'm now 17 and i'm studying A-levels in Bio, Chem,
> > Maths,
> > > > and Art; but I dont know what 17 year olds are studying in America?
> > (Alevels
> > > > / degrees/ baccalaureetes )

> > > > So basically what i would like to know is a) do i apply for graduate
or
> > > > undergraduate

> > > >                                                     and b) what is
the
> > US
> > > > equivalent of what I'm studying now

> > > --
> > > Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
> > > Brooklyn, NY
> > > 718-258-5001
> > > http://www.dentaltwins.com



Thu, 29 May 2003 00:12:39 GMT
 someone please help me!!
Hi James,

Quote:

>But being a foreigner (British) I'm confused by
>your (American) education system

Just wait til you see their Election system !

Hans
                                                           ;-)
==================================

Quote:

>okay, i want to enroll to university in the US to study dentistry for fall
>2002. But being a foreigner (British) i'm confused by your (American)
>education system. Now, the thing i dont get is do I apply to an
>undergraduate college, or a graduate college (like the Harvard School of
>Dental Medicine). I'm now 17 and i'm studying A-levels in Bio, Chem, Maths,
>and Art; but I dont know what 17 year olds are studying in America? (Alevels
>/ degrees/ baccalaureetes )

>So basically what i would like to know is a) do i apply for graduate or
>undergraduate

>                                                    and b) what is the US
>equivalent of what I'm studying now



Sun, 01 Jun 2003 14:53:10 GMT
 
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