50 year old amalgam fillings 
Author Message
 50 year old amalgam fillings

Before I bring up my current  question, here is an update on an earlier
series of submissions that Joel Eichen responded to. I had  decay under one
cap  (end) of a bridge that spanned a missing tooth. After getting more than
one opinion and looking  at a digital x-ray I decided to have the 50 year
old  gold bridge removed as I could see the visible decay was smack against
the base of the cap. I was concerned that if an attempt were made to drill
under the cap just "by feel" it would be impossible to be sure all of it was
removed. (Of course x-rays cannot reveal  what is going on under a cap.)

My decision turned out to be the simplest and the best. There was extensive
decay so that more than  one third of the tooth above the gum line (covered
by the cap) had rotted away, almost to the gum line and the nerve was
affected. Before a new bridge could be  placed it was necessary to place a
pin and build up the tooth. The dentist who had planned to do the rootc{*filter*}
himself referred me to an endodontist who had the microscopic drill needed
for such a very calcified tooth.

Before the old bridge was cut up for removal the dentist took impressions so
that the "bite" of the new bridge would duplicate the old. All turned out
well and I am pleased except for total costs of around $3,000.(San Diego is
an expensive area of the country.) Also there was no time to shop around for
endodontist fees once the root was exposed. I took the endodontist who could
see me most quickly.

Now to my  question. The dentist wants to replace all old amalgam fillings.
He did not mention mercury leakage. (He knew I knew the ADA does not find
this justification for replacing old amalgam fillings.) He spoke of gaps
between the edge of the amalgam fillings and the tooth enamel and commented
this risked decay and commented it was safest to replace the old fillings
because there might be undetected decay that an x-ray cannot show.. These
fillings are fifty to fifty five years old for the most part and rather
large.Over the years three teeth were capped because of new decay leading to
partial breakage of the tooth.Unfortunately of course x-rays cannot
penetrate fillings.

I am wondering whether to have the proposed work done to prevent future
problems that may or may not occur. Also I have concern about the risk of
having a tooth crack from drilling out large old fillings. Any generalized
comments on this would be appreciated as I take my time to decide what to
do.

Betty



Mon, 29 Aug 2005 13:05:35 GMT
 50 year old amalgam fillings

Quote:
>Subject:  Re:50 year old amalgam fillings

>Date: 3/13/03 12:05 AM US Eastern Standard Time

>Before I bring up my current  question, here is an update on an earlier
>series of submissions that Joel Eichen responded to. I had  decay under one
>cap  (end) of a bridge that spanned a missing tooth. After getting more than
>one opinion and looking  at a digital x-ray I decided to have the 50 year
>old  gold bridge removed as I could see the visible decay was smack against
>the base of the cap. I was concerned that if an attempt were made to drill
>under the cap just "by feel" it would be impossible to be sure all of it was
>removed. (Of course x-rays cannot reveal  what is going on under a cap.)

>My decision turned out to be the simplest and the best. There was extensive
>decay so that more than  one third of the tooth above the gum line (covered
>by the cap) had rotted away, almost to the gum line and the nerve was
>affected. Before a new bridge could be  placed it was necessary to place a
>pin and build up the tooth. The dentist who had planned to do the rootc{*filter*}
>himself referred me to an endodontist who had the microscopic drill needed
>for such a very calcified tooth.

>Before the old bridge was cut up for removal the dentist took impressions so
>that the "bite" of the new bridge would duplicate the old. All turned out
>well and I am pleased except for total costs of around $3,000.(San Diego is
>an expensive area of the country.) Also there was no time to shop around for
>endodontist fees once the root was exposed. I took the endodontist who could
>see me most quickly.

>Now to my  question. The dentist wants to replace all old amalgam fillings.
>He did not mention mercury leakage. (He knew I knew the ADA does not find
>this justification for replacing old amalgam fillings.) He spoke of gaps
>between the edge of the amalgam fillings and the tooth enamel and commented
>this risked decay and commented it was safest to replace the old fillings
>because there might be undetected decay that an x-ray cannot show.. These
>fillings are fifty to fifty five years old for the most part and rather
>large.Over the years three teeth were capped because of new decay leading to
>partial breakage of the tooth.Unfortunately of course x-rays cannot
>penetrate fillings.

>I am wondering whether to have the proposed work done to prevent future
>problems that may or may not occur. Also I have concern about the risk of
>having a tooth crack from drilling out large old fillings. Any generalized
>comments on this would be appreciated as I take my time to decide what to
>do.

>Betty

Here is a listing of alternative dentists.

Good Luck!

Jan

http://www.***.com/



Mon, 29 Aug 2005 13:17:23 GMT
 
 [ 2 post ] 

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