Replace mercury fillings? 
Author Message
 Replace mercury fillings?

Hello All-Which is the best course of action to replace amalgam-mercury
fillings?What material is best to use instead of amalgam?
Thanks much.ST


Tue, 18 May 2004 15:49:26 GMT
 Replace mercury fillings?
Newsgroups: sci.med.dentistry

Subject: Replace mercury fillings?
Date: Fri, 30 Nov 2001 00:49:26 -0700 (MST)
Organization: WebTV Subscriber

Hello All-Which is the best course of action to replace amalgam-mercury
fillings?What material is best to use instead of amalgam?
Thanks much.ST

?,??,?o`o?,??,?o`o?,??,?o`o?,??,?o`o?,??,??,??,

JanBrewSki prefers full dentures ... because you never know when your health
will be bad nad you hve to CHECK the TEETH!!!!!!!

My take:

The best course of action to replace amalgam-mercury
fillings is to wait until the DOCTOR tells you it is necessary or even
advisable!

********************************
As always, my comments
only for group discussion and
are not intended as diagnosis.

Cheers,

Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S.

*******************************

Tomorrow we answer the burning question,

 "What is the best month in which to get your appendix removed?"

Oh. Sorry. No.

That is the hemorrhoids question.

--
Posted from [63.214.209.24] by way of oe75.pav1.hotmail.com [64.4.30.210]
via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG



Tue, 18 May 2004 20:34:09 GMT
 Replace mercury fillings?


Quote:
> Hello All-Which is the best course of action to replace amalgam-mercury
> fillings?What material is best to use instead of amalgam?
> Thanks much.ST

Why are you replacing them? If the reasons are cosemtic, inlays are a more
expensive, but superior way of doing this. An inlay is esentially a custom
made filling. If made from cermaic materials they can be highy aesthetic and
will last much longer in large cavities than a white filling. If the reasons
are because you are concerned about the safety of amalgam, talk to your
dentist, make an appointment with your doctor and discuss it with him, if
you still feel inconvinced, and getting your amalgams replaced would give
you peace of mind, get the replaced.

Markus Roach D.D.S



Wed, 19 May 2004 03:26:25 GMT
 Replace mercury fillings?

Quote:

>Date: 11/30/01 2:26 PM US Eastern Standard Time



>> Hello All-Which is the best course of action to replace amalgam-mercury
>> fillings?What material is best to use instead of amalgam?
>> Thanks much.ST

>Why are you replacing them? If the reasons are cosemtic, inlays are a more
>expensive, but superior way of doing this. An inlay is esentially a custom
>made filling. If made from cermaic materials they can be highy aesthetic and
>will last much longer in large cavities than a white filling. If the reasons
>are because you are concerned about the safety of amalgam, talk to your
>dentist

ONLY an alt. dentist who KNOWS and ADMITS that metal in the mouth is dangerous.

, make an appointment with your doctor and discuss it with him, if

Quote:
>you still feel inconvinced, and getting your amalgams replaced would give
>you peace of mind, get the replaced.

>Markus Roach D.D.S

Now to answer the question:

A compatibility test should be done. Make sure the dentist follows correct
protocol.

http://www.zip.com.au/~rgammal/AmalRemProc.html

http://www.curezone.com/dental/dental_amalgam.asp

http://www.ccrlab.com/

http://www.holisticmed.com/dental/amalgam/iaomt.txt

http://www.holisticmed.com/dental/amalgam/

http://www.naturomedbc.com/clinchandouts/dentistprotocol.htm

http://www.envirodental.co.uk/iaomtrmv.asp

http://www.hugnet.com/protocol.html

http://www.biologicaldent.com/center_for_biological_dentistry/protoco...

Jan

The world cares very little about what a person knows; it is what the person is
able to do that counts. Booker T Washington



Wed, 19 May 2004 03:52:02 GMT
 Replace mercury fillings?

Quote:

>Hello All-Which is the best course of action to replace amalgam-mercury
>fillings?What material is best to use instead of amalgam?
>Thanks much.ST

For what type of cavity?

RR
--
http://www.ariplex.com/ama/amacaulk.htm



Fri, 21 May 2004 04:52:39 GMT
 Replace mercury fillings?

Quote:

> Hello All-Which is the best course of action to replace amalgam-mercury
> fillings?What material is best to use instead of amalgam?

First of all, do not replace perfectly good amalgam fillings. Contrary to what
the net.whackos will tell you, amalgam fillings more than a week old don't
emit significant amounts of mercury vapor -- until you start drilling on them
again.

Secondly: The appropriate material depends on the tooth, the tooth structure
and amount remaining, how much additional decay has happened due to a failed
amalgam, etc. Your dentist is the appropriate guide here. Composite filling
materials have apparently come a long way since they were first introduced,
when they were pretty pathetic, but there are still many situations where they
are not appropriate (and a few where amalgams are not appropriate also, where
a crown may be necessary).

By no means should you allow yourself to be terrified into hasty actions by
quacks who have a vested interest in profiting from your terror. Same deal with
the obsessive-compusive paranoics who inhabit this newsgroup with nothing
better to do with their time. Get the facts, find a dentist who is more
concerned about your {*filter*}health than about padding his wallet, and do what's
appropriate, not what some whacko has scared you into doing.

--
Eric Lee Green          GnuPG public key at http://www.***.com/

             You do not save freedom by destroying freedom



Fri, 21 May 2004 10:16:21 GMT
 Replace mercury fillings?

Quote:

> The best course of action to replace amalgam-mercury
> fillings is to wait until the DOCTOR tells you it is necessary or even
> advisable!

True enough, but if an amalgam filling has failed and must be replaced (e.g. a
dentist has detected decay under the margin or it fell out or whatever), what
materials are available to do the replacement?

So far I've seen mentioned on this group:

Composites (basically epoxy glue with various other materials added to try to
make them tougher)

Inlays (a custom-built filling or cap bonded to the tooth, made of porcelin or
some other tough material),

Another amalgam filling (but may not be possible, depending upon reason for
failure of previous amalgam, may not be enough tooth structure),

Crown (if not enough tooth structure to do another filling).

Have I missed something? Is there something that I got wrong? (Especially
confused about inlays, because there appears to be so many things called an
"inlay" that I'm not sure). Under what circumstances are the various materials
appropriate?

Eric Lee Green          GnuPG public key at http://badtux.org/eric/eric.gpg

             You do not save freedom by destroying freedom



Fri, 21 May 2004 10:26:56 GMT
 Replace mercury fillings?



Quote:

> > The best course of action to replace amalgam-mercury
> > fillings is to wait until the DOCTOR tells you it is necessary or even
> > advisable!

> True enough, but if an amalgam filling has failed and must be replaced
(e.g. a
> dentist has detected decay under the margin or it fell out or whatever),
what
> materials are available to do the replacement?

> So far I've seen mentioned on this group:

> Composites (basically epoxy glue with various other materials added to try
to
> make them tougher)

> Inlays (a custom-built filling or cap bonded to the tooth, made of
porcelin or
> some other tough material),

> Another amalgam filling (but may not be possible, depending upon reason
for
> failure of previous amalgam, may not be enough tooth structure),

> Crown (if not enough tooth structure to do another filling).

> Have I missed something? Is there something that I got wrong? (Especially
> confused about inlays, because there appears to be so many things called
an
> "inlay" that I'm not sure). Under what circumstances are the various
materials
> appropriate?

Composites are a little better than your description might suggest, but IMO
inlays-if your budget allow you-are both aesthetic and long lasting. If you
are on a tight budget amalgam, whilst compromising aesthetics, is probably
your best bet.


Fri, 21 May 2004 12:02:04 GMT
 Replace mercury fillings?
Just a reminder....

JanDrew is not an expert on anything dental related. She is a retired
daycare worker.

When she says to find an alt.dentist, she is recommending you find a dentist
who prescribes to sensational medicine instead of recognized diagnostic
practices.

JanDrew leads people through the sin of omission to believe she is an expert
in the dental field. She has no credentials and most often quotes quacks and
for profit herbal hacks as her source of info.

I am not claiming here that amalgams are 100% safe 100% of the time. BUT I
will not lead you to believe I am a toxicologist or that I work for the
center for disease control.

Dr Roach's post was simple and accurate.

Get a MD's opinion if you fear toxic issues of amalgams. If he/she
recommends removal, find someone who does it well.

Dental


Quote:

> >Date: 11/30/01 2:26 PM US Eastern Standard Time



> >> Hello All-Which is the best course of action to replace amalgam-mercury
> >> fillings?What material is best to use instead of amalgam?
> >> Thanks much.ST

> >Why are you replacing them? If the reasons are cosemtic, inlays are a
more
> >expensive, but superior way of doing this. An inlay is esentially a
custom
> >made filling. If made from cermaic materials they can be highy aesthetic
and
> >will last much longer in large cavities than a white filling. If the
reasons
> >are because you are concerned about the safety of amalgam, talk to your
> >dentist

> ONLY an alt. dentist who KNOWS and ADMITS that metal in the mouth is
dangerous.

> , make an appointment with your doctor and discuss it with him, if
> >you still feel inconvinced, and getting your amalgams replaced would give
> >you peace of mind, get the replaced.

> >Markus Roach D.D.S

> Now to answer the question:

> A compatibility test should be done. Make sure the dentist follows correct
> protocol.

> http://www.zip.com.au/~rgammal/AmalRemProc.html

> http://www.curezone.com/dental/dental_amalgam.asp

> http://www.ccrlab.com/

> http://www.holisticmed.com/dental/amalgam/iaomt.txt

> http://www.holisticmed.com/dental/amalgam/

> http://www.naturomedbc.com/clinchandouts/dentistprotocol.htm

> http://www.envirodental.co.uk/iaomtrmv.asp

> http://www.hugnet.com/protocol.html

http://www.biologicaldent.com/center_for_biological_dentistry/protoco...

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> Jan

> The world cares very little about what a person knows; it is what the
person is
> able to do that counts. Booker T Washington



Fri, 21 May 2004 13:24:28 GMT
 Replace mercury fillings?

Quote:

>> Have I missed something? Is there something that I got wrong? (Especially
>> confused about inlays, because there appears to be so many things called
> an
>> "inlay" that I'm not sure). Under what circumstances are the various
> materials
>> appropriate?

> Composites are a little better than your description might suggest,

I hope so, since when two amalgam restorations failed I had them replaced with
composites. We'll see. The amalgams lasted 20 years. I'm suspecting the
composites will last nowhere near that long, but ....

Quote:
> but IMO
> inlays-if your budget allow you-are both aesthetic and long lasting.

I'm an engineer. My budget allows a lot :-). Is there a point at which you
would say "I don't recommend doing a composite on this, let's do an inlay
instead"? If, say, I have a fairly deep cavity in my top right rear molar,
would that be one of those judgement calls where you'd have to think about it,
or do you think a composite would work just fine and no thinking necessary?

Quote:
> If you
> are on a tight budget amalgam, whilst compromising aesthetics, is probably
> your best bet.

What I like (as an engineer) about amalgam is its durability. 20-25 years does
not seem to be unusual if the tooth was properly prepared. How long do inlays
last? Longer?

--
Eric Lee Green          GnuPG public key at http://badtux.org/eric/eric.gpg

             You do not save freedom by destroying freedom



Fri, 21 May 2004 16:17:00 GMT
 Replace mercury fillings?
Newsgroups: sci.med.dentistry

Subject: Re: Replace mercury fillings?
Date: Sun, 02 Dec 2001 19:16:21 -0700
Organization: Newsfeeds.com http://www.***.com/ 73,000+ UNCENSORED
Newsgroups.

MY COMMENTS AT THE END- jme

Quote:

> Hello All-Which is the best course of action to replace amalgam-mercury
> fillings?What material is best to use instead of amalgam?

First of all, do not replace perfectly good amalgam fillings. Contrary to
what
the net.whackos will tell you, amalgam fillings more than a week old don't
emit significant amounts of mercury vapor -- until you start drilling on
them
again.

Secondly: The appropriate material depends on the tooth, the tooth structure
and amount remaining, how much additional decay has happened due to a failed
amalgam, etc. Your dentist is the appropriate guide here. Composite filling
materials have apparently come a long way since they were first introduced,
when they were pretty pathetic, but there are still many situations where
they
are not appropriate (and a few where amalgams are not appropriate also,
where
a crown may be necessary).

By no means should you allow yourself to be terrified into hasty actions by
quacks who have a vested interest in profiting from your terror. Same deal
with
the obsessive-compusive paranoics who inhabit this newsgroup with nothing
better to do with their time. Get the facts, find a dentist who is more
concerned about your {*filter*}health than about padding his wallet, and do
what's
appropriate, not what some whacko has scared you into doing.

--
Eric Lee Green          GnuPG public key at http://www.***.com/

             You do not save freedom by destroying freedom

****

Kudos to you Mr. Green.

You are very well-versed in science. If you are an engineer as I believe I
read before, this is very encouraging. You and Vaughn Simon are two of the
most sensible people I have met in quite a while.

Thanks again.

Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S.

--
Posted from [209.246.211.146] by way of oe27.pav1.hotmail.com [64.4.30.84]
via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.***.com/



Fri, 21 May 2004 18:50:13 GMT
 Replace mercury fillings?
Newsgroups: sci.med.dentistry

Subject: Re: Replace mercury fillings?
Date: Sun, 02 Dec 2001 19:26:56 -0700
Organization: Newsfeeds.com http://www.newsfeeds.com 73,000+ UNCENSORED
Newsgroups.

Quote:

> The best course of action to replace amalgam-mercury
> fillings is to wait until the DOCTOR tells you it is necessary or even
> advisable!

True enough, but if an amalgam filling has failed and must be replaced (e.g.
a
dentist has detected decay under the margin or it fell out or whatever),
what
materials are available to do the replacement?

So far I've seen mentioned on this group:

Composites (basically epoxy glue with various other materials added to try
to
make them tougher)

Inlays (a custom-built filling or cap bonded to the tooth, made of porcelin
or
some other tough material),

Another amalgam filling (but may not be possible, depending upon reason for
failure of previous amalgam, may not be enough tooth structure),

Crown (if not enough tooth structure to do another filling).

Have I missed something? Is there something that I got wrong? (Especially
confused about inlays, because there appears to be so many things called an
"inlay" that I'm not sure). Under what circumstances are the various
materials
appropriate?

REPLY:

Yes. Quite coinciDENTALLY, I showed my class a beautiful Class V gold foil
that I had installed many years back which recently was extracted for
prosthetics purposes. It was as beautiful as the day it was installed. I
also showed them my pneumatic and trip-hammer condensers.

Gold foil is 24K gold, originally in sheets (hence foil), later in ropes,
but always very tedious to work with. Gold is malleable, meaning that
individual pieces will meld together to produce a solid mass. It is the
perfect restoration. Gold's ductility allows perfect adaptablility to the
cavo-surface margins. And gold is perfectly noble. This means it does not
rust.

Gold foil is perfect except for the time constraint!

This approach was quite popular before 1906 at which time cerre perdu was
introduced to the dental profession. Cerre perdu? Lost wax technique for
inlays.

The rest is history -- some good, some bad, but always most enjoyable!
Particularly now, with adhesion dentistry at our fingertips!

Cheers,

Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S.

Also there's Miracle Mix! My students asked, "For plants, right?" Nope. It
is composite reinforced with silver alloy but no mercury at all. I guess
that is like eating a no-fat salad dressing with your salad along with the
pound of french fries or something like that.

Forest fires out west released 6,000 tons of mercury this past summer.
Released, as into the atmosphere!

Eric Lee Green          GnuPG public key at http://badtux.org/eric/eric.gpg

             You do not save freedom by destroying freedom

--
Posted from [209.246.211.146] by way of oe56.pav1.hotmail.com [64.4.30.191]
via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG



Fri, 21 May 2004 19:00:37 GMT
 Replace mercury fillings?


Quote:
>If you
>are on a tight budget amalgam, whilst compromising aesthetics, is probably
>your best bet.

If really on a tight budget, extraction is the best choice.

RR
--
Amalgamists poison their own people.



Sat, 22 May 2004 05:26:40 GMT
 Replace mercury fillings?
On Sun, 2 Dec 2001 23:24:28 -0600, "DentalStuff"

Quote:

>JanDrew is not an expert on anything dental related. She is a retired
>daycare worker.

Who cares?

Quote:
>When she says to find an alt.dentist, she is recommending you find a dentist
>who prescribes to sensational medicine instead of recognized diagnostic
>practices.

True.

Quote:
>JanDrew leads people through the sin of omission to believe she is an expert
>in the dental field.

Many dentists do the same.

Quote:
>She has no credentials

Really?

Quote:
>and most often quotes quacks

True.

Quote:
>and for profit herbal hacks as her source of info.

Too bad.

Quote:
>I am not claiming here that amalgams are 100% safe 100% of the time.

GOOD!

Quote:
>BUT I will not lead you to believe I am a toxicologist or that I work for the
>center for disease control.

How about dentistry?

Quote:
>Dr Roach's post was simple and accurate.

No.

Quote:
>Get a MD's opinion if you fear toxic issues of amalgams. If he/she
>recommends removal, find someone who does it well.

Amalgam IS toxic. No question about that.

The problem is what to use instead of amalgam and how to replace it.

RR
--

Byte here:      X-------X



Sat, 22 May 2004 06:22:48 GMT
 Replace mercury fillings?

Quote:
>What I like (as an engineer) about amalgam is its durability. 20-25 years does
>not seem to be unusual if the tooth was properly prepared. How long do inlays
>last? Longer?

Plutonium lasts much longer. Would you put plutonium into your teeth?

RR
--
Reality.sys corrupt. (A)bort, (I)gnore, (R)eboot universe?
(Usenet)



Sat, 22 May 2004 06:49:30 GMT
 
 [ 85 post ]  Go to page: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

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