Need a new mouth (long-in-the-tooth tale) 
Author Message
 Need a new mouth (long-in-the-tooth tale)

Hi
spent almost 3 hours in the chair of a student at the dental school here!  they
are so thorough.  i will know more about each tooth than i ever wanted to know.
 but it's the first time i almost fell asleep in the dentist's chair!  (Of
course, the drill was not in use.).  She's a second year student, with plenty
of supervision.  still i'm a little shaky about what is to be done.  

i have several pockets - more like suitcases - one is 9 mm, one is a 7 mm, and
a few at 5.  the rest are all 2, 3, or 4s.  Beginning in two weeks, i get some
real dental work done for the first time in months, since i started going.  I
told the student i will probably be attending her graduation, and that if we
survive each other, then i'll continue to be her patient after she starts her
own business.

in two weeks, she will begin scaling and planing, the lower right quadrant.
they do a quadrant at a time at $50 bucks a quadrant.  she will be spending
almost the entire 2-1/2 hours on that one quadrant.  now that i have an idea of
sort of what a scaling and planing actually mean - (the training professor came
and told the student working on my mouth that no, it was not a 7 mm pocket, but
a 9 mm pocket with bone decay).  Sounds just great.  He wants her to clean off
the plaque and then wait 3 weeks on that side, to see if it is really serious,
in which case, i'll need the perio to do something, not sure what, we haven't
gotten there yet.

i am not a great dental patient.  i cry a lot and have trained dentists who are
willing to work with me how to understand my hand signals.  i am no fun as a
patient when drilling and i experience a lot of fear.  but i have no choice.
this young woman is about to learn much from my mouth; i will learn much about
why i need to take more care of my {*filter*}health, and possibly get some real help
with the tmj down the line.  i've been reading some of the tmj posts here, but
i realize that instead of reading so much about other people's problems with
it, i will pay more attention to my own.  

they will eventually take an entire panoramic radiograph of my mouth showing
all the bones and joints, etc. and then do a whole bite thing.  but that's down
the line.  I will finish with the dentist in about 2 years and will have a new
mouth.  I say new because most of my crowns must be replaced as they are very
old.  even the 3 front teeth, with the gold in the back and the porcelein
front, are receding where the gold is showing (that was done around 30 years
ago).  My mouth looks like a picasso to the student and her professor: some of
the work was done in India, some in New York, some in California, some by a
Russian dentist.  

I will need crowns replaced, and new crowns where a crown should have been a
few years ago.  I am finally going to have to face the fact that if i don't
take care of my teeth NOW, it would not be long before I would be in greater
discomfort and  lose of all my teeth.  I have the opportunity to save what I
have got and get some excellent supervised work done.  the professors are very
thorough.

i am a little shaky about a 2nd year student doing this.  i will get local
anesthesia, but they're going in quite deep.  YIPES!!!!!!!!!!!!!  i wish there
was something that would help soften up the calcification.  

i am going to start flossing (Glide), rinsing with listerine and then brushing.
i have an electronic toothbrush (braun).  if anyone has any really very
simplified ways or daily rituals that have helped them A LOT, i'd love to hear
what you do.  I have to somehow hypnotize myself to also brush before i go to
sleep ("You WILL brush before sleep.  You WILL brush before sleep.")

Meanwhile, I am thinking of taking half a Val to calm me down before i go for
the scaling and planing.  the word "scaling" i can understand.  The word
"planing" says "shaping" to me, and concerns me even more.  Please do not give
me any serious graphic description of this.  I won't sleep.  I will close my
eyes and let her do the work and give my hand signals and somehow survive.  

as far as I am concerned, and i speak only for myself, i do not have any
alternative whatsoever and i am glad that i am finally doing something to take
care of my dental health.  however, sitting there, looking at everything and
how it is done in this famous dental institution, looking at all the mostly
older professors and teachers passing down their knowledge, looking at all the
equipment and the work that is done in the mouth and with what instruments - it
just seems to me that the entire dental profession - is still in the Dark Ages.

it must be gotten through.  are there any people in this newsgroup who do not
work in the dental profession, who are absolute cowards, but somehow, someway,
have gotten through it all?  

i can talk about my teeth forever. i sure hope i have not bored anyone.

Deva



Mon, 10 Mar 2003 03:00:00 GMT
 Need a new mouth (long-in-the-tooth tale)


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Need a new mouth (long-in-the-tooth tale)
thanks for actually reading my long post.  i have an appointment with the
student dentist on oct. 2.  every day i am thinking of this appointment.
aren't there any dentists who are just as lacking in courage as non-dentists?

a couple of years ago, after going with a friend to the emergency room of a
dental clinic,  i thought of starting a business called something like "Dental
Pals."  I would accompany people to their dental appointments - kind of like
their own personal masseuse and breath trainer.  While they were in the
dentist's chair i would lead them into breath therapy, (the dentist would allow
me only a few minutes) whereby they can control their fear and become more
relaxed.  If they have to wait in the office itself, i would give them a
shoulder massage, have them loosen up their face, their jaws.  a kind of yoga
for the face with {*filter*} expressions.  of course, this would be funny in the
office, but who cares if it relaxes?

Or, if the above wasn't possible, to accompany them on their appointments, hold
their hand.  Coming out, i would congratulate them on their heroism and get
them home.  

Now THAT's service.   How's this for a headline for my ad:
"LAUGH YOUR WAY TO THE DENTIST"

of course, i would need to hire myself when i go to the dentist!
Deva



Thu, 13 Mar 2003 03:00:00 GMT
 Need a new mouth (long-in-the-tooth tale)


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Need a new mouth (long-in-the-tooth tale)

Maybe Deva would like to accompany me "through life as me" while I try
to get my "dental needs" managed.  I don't think she'd be laughing
long.  And I don't think she'd be making snide remarks in public
newsgroup posts about my ego either.  

Do I think "Deva" knows what I have to go through *trying* to deal
with this????????  No, I don't think she does.  So, I'm trying to
ignore her opinions about me as a matter of her not knowing how to
communicate with or about me any differently than she does because
she's just following some leader(s).

Sabra Broock



Quote:
>thanks for actually reading my long post.  i have an appointment with the
>student dentist on oct. 2.  every day i am thinking of this appointment.
>aren't there any dentists who are just as lacking in courage as non-dentists?

>a couple of years ago, after going with a friend to the emergency room of a
>dental clinic,  i thought of starting a business called something like "Dental
>Pals."  I would accompany people to their dental appointments - kind of like
>their own personal masseuse and breath trainer.  While they were in the
>dentist's chair i would lead them into breath therapy, (the dentist would allow
>me only a few minutes) whereby they can control their fear and become more
>relaxed.  If they have to wait in the office itself, i would give them a
>shoulder massage, have them loosen up their face, their jaws.  a kind of yoga
>for the face with {*filter*} expressions.  of course, this would be funny in the
>office, but who cares if it relaxes?

>Or, if the above wasn't possible, to accompany them on their appointments, hold
>their hand.  Coming out, i would congratulate them on their heroism and get
>them home.  

>Now THAT's service.   How's this for a headline for my ad:
>"LAUGH YOUR WAY TO THE DENTIST"

>of course, i would need to hire myself when i go to the dentist!
>Deva



Thu, 13 Mar 2003 03:00:00 GMT
 Need a new mouth (long-in-the-tooth tale)
helooooooooo?


Thu, 13 Mar 2003 03:00:00 GMT
 Need a new mouth (long-in-the-tooth tale)


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Need a new mouth (long-in-the-tooth tale)
hi sabra,
when i wrote the post to the newsgroup, i wrote that about myself and nobody
else.  the post was not about you at all.  i did not think of you when i wrote
it.  i was sharing something that i had been actually considering for awhile.
it is no joke.  i have no idea what you are talking about and i don't
understand where your paranoia is coming from.
Deva


Thu, 13 Mar 2003 03:00:00 GMT
 Need a new mouth (long-in-the-tooth tale)


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Need a new mouth (long-in-the-tooth tale)

Quote:
> (snip) to accompany me "through life as me" while I try
> to get my "dental needs" managed.

> Sabra Broock

Dear Sabra, Hello, How have you been?  I hope that you've been well and
happy, I'm glad that you're still feisty!  I've missed you.  Were you
able to get you abscessed tooth (teeth?) removed or treated?  You were
waiting for treatment plan approval from your health care
provider/insurer. . .  If you're up to talking about it then please let
us know what happened and how it went.  Kindest regards, M.

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.



Sun, 16 Mar 2003 03:00:00 GMT
 Need a new mouth (long-in-the-tooth tale)

Quote:

>> (snip) to accompany me "through life as me" while I try
>> to get my "dental needs" managed.

>> Sabra Broock

>Dear Sabra, Hello, How have you been?  I hope that you've been well and
>happy, I'm glad that you're still feisty!  I've missed you.  Were you
>able to get you abscessed tooth (teeth?) removed or treated?  You were
>waiting for treatment plan approval from your health care
>provider/insurer. . .  If you're up to talking about it then please let
>us know what happened and how it went.  Kindest regards, M.

Hello M.,

My machine froze and I lost the first copy I wrote in reply to your
kind post.  So I'll give it another try now.

The surgery wasn't done in June as we had hoped.  The insurance
company dragged their heels and the date we hoped for passed us by.
Then I had another medical need develop that had to be managed and
that delayed everything until I could make more plans with respect to
when I would be recovered to undergo the dental related surgery.

As you remember, there are two abscessed molars involved.  There is
some recent concern about a finding previously not recongnized on the
studies that causes some serious worry about another molar above the
two known to be abscessed.   There is fear that this tooth will also
be at risk of being sacrificed for lack of access for treatment... or
if the tooth is too damaged to try to save.  Oh my........ what an
ordeal this is for me and the people trying to help me.

The insurance company finally agreed in July to cover the hospital and
operating room as well as an independent anesthesiologist.  (I require
nasotracheal fiberoptic anesthesia.)  The matter of whether the
maxillo{*filter*} surgery (complicated extractions and establishment of
jaw opening for the dentist)  will have coverage isn't decided.  It
couldn't be addressed with a letter of appeal until the surgery was
scheduled.  The prosthetic joints are at risk of damage during the
process of accessing the space.  My surgeon knows exactly how much to
push the opening under anesthesia without risking the prosthetics
attachment to the mandibular bone.

Surgery is scheduled for Oct. 25th.  

Unfortunately, the treatment plans are somewhat by the seat of their
pants.  The rear lower molar has to be removed for two reasons:  it is
impossible to access for treatment and the condition under ideal
circumstances would be have a very poor prognosis at best -- so, that
leaves me out.  Secondly, removing that tooth will give the dentist a
few additional millimeters of space to work in ... that will make the
chances for successful root c{*filter*}therapy upon the tooth in front of
it greater.  Still, the second lower tooth may not be salvageable.
The dentist won't know until the tooth is accessed.  Now to make
everything that much more worriesome, there appears to be great
question as to the condition of another molar directly above the other
two needing treatment.

All in all, I am at risk of losing three molars on the left side.
This is devastating to me because no one, especially not me,  has any
idea what impact this will have upon the stability of my condition
that I have spend so many years adapting to... Eating, swallowing, you
name it... nothing will be the same for me....

Crowns and dental implants are not  options for me.  Presently, we're
thinking the best idea might be to get models while I'm under
anesthesia (that is our only chance) and then build something to wear
at night to keep  for the teeth stable in their positions.  This
something might be similar to a bite guard -- maybe some better idea
will follow the surgery.  Obviously, this "thing" may be a problem for
me to wear...  The truth is, I'm having a very difficult time coming
to terms with accepting the worse case scenario as a possibility. It
is the only way I have been able to go into any operating room
situation for many years now.  If I don't think I can live with the
worst outcome, then I am not emotionally prepared to take that risk.
That is my philosophy.   The bottom line:  I am terrified by the
entire thing.  

Thank you so very much for asking for an update and for showing me
this kindness.  Your concern coming from the someone in the newsgroup
makes many things much easier for to try to manage, M.  I promise when
I have more info to share (for study purposes) that I will do so...
and after all is done, I anticipate some time before I'm "on my feet"
so to speak.  In 1992, my dental hospitalization was very difficult...
and there's little reason to anticipant things to be any different
this time.  Again, anticipation is the most difficult part I face
right now.

Sincerely,

Sabra Broock



Sun, 16 Mar 2003 03:00:00 GMT
 Need a new mouth (long-in-the-tooth tale)

<substantial snip>

Quote:
> All in all, I am at risk of losing three molars on the left side.
> This is devastating to me because no one, especially not me,  has any
> idea what impact this will have upon the stability of my condition
> that I have spend so many years adapting to... Eating, swallowing, you
> name it... nothing will be the same for me....

> Crowns and dental implants are not  options for me.  Presently, we're
> thinking the best idea might be to get models while I'm under
> anesthesia (that is our only chance) and then build something to wear
> at night to keep  for the teeth stable in their positions.  This
> something might be similar to a bite guard -- maybe some better idea
> will follow the surgery.  Obviously, this "thing" may be a problem for
> me to wear...  The truth is, I'm having a very difficult time coming
> to terms with accepting the worse case scenario as a possibility. It
> is the only way I have been able to go into any operating room
> situation for many years now.  If I don't think I can live with the
> worst outcome, then I am not emotionally prepared to take that risk.
> That is my philosophy.   The bottom line:  I am terrified by the
> entire thing.

<more snipped>

Sabra,

While I detest your general approach to others who come to these newsgroups
with jaw-related problems, I would not wish your Oct. 25 surgery on anyone.

Thank you for sharing your update on the newsgroup. Others need to see this
straight-forward writing of yours as well as the reality that jaw problems
have caused your life.

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.



Mon, 17 Mar 2003 12:29:15 GMT
 
 [ 13 post ] 

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