Amalgam CANNOT be banned in the US. 
Author Message
 Amalgam CANNOT be banned in the US.

For all the hoopla about amalgam toxicity, there has not been adequate studies
which are double-blinded, and with a large enough sample size to show
convincingly that amalgam restorations are indeed toxic to the human condition.

With that said, amalgam use will die--- a natural death.  More and more
dentists are using the newer generation of composite materials, and the use of
amalgam is diminishing year by year.  I have been a dentist serving a
'high-end' clientele for 20 years,  and over the past few years, the use of
amalgam has diminished to probably less than 1% of my practice-  not because
amalgam is so bad, but because there are so many other restorative materials
which do the job better!

Edward M. Reifman, MS, DDS.



Fri, 18 May 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 Amalgam CANNOT be banned in the US.
Thanks Ed,

What you have so elequently stated is what every American dentist
knows - Thans for your comments.

Cheers,

Joel

Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S.

===========

Quote:

>For all the hoopla about amalgam toxicity, there has not been adequate studies
>which are double-blinded, and with a large enough sample size to show
>convincingly that amalgam restorations are indeed toxic to the human condition.
>With that said, amalgam use will die--- a natural death.  More and more
>dentists are using the newer generation of composite materials, and the use of
>amalgam is diminishing year by year.  I have been a dentist serving a
>'high-end' clientele for 20 years,  and over the past few years, the use of
>amalgam has diminished to probably less than 1% of my practice-  not because
>amalgam is so bad, but because there are so many other restorative materials
>which do the job better!
>Edward M. Reifman, MS, DDS.



Fri, 18 May 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 Amalgam CANNOT be banned in the US.

Quote:
>Thanks Ed,

>What you have so elequently stated is what every American dentist
>knows - Thans for your comments.
[Snip...]
>>For all the hoopla about amalgam toxicity, there has not been adequate studies
>>which are double-blinded, and with a large enough sample size to show
>>convincingly that amalgam restorations are indeed toxic to the human condition.

>>With that said, amalgam use will die--- a natural death.  More and more
>>dentists are using the newer generation of composite materials, and the use of
>>amalgam is diminishing year by year.  I have been a dentist serving a
>>'high-end' clientele for 20 years,  and over the past few years, the use of
>>amalgam has diminished to probably less than 1% of my practice-  not because
>>amalgam is so bad, but because there are so many other restorative materials
>>which do the job better!

>>Edward M. Reifman, MS, DDS.

May I interject a question here?

Did the public health initiative to fluoridate drinking water in any
way put stress on the dental profession to "find fewer cavities"?

That is to say, bluntly, did the ivory carvers find it a bit too hot
to continue the scam and opt for other means to make a living.

To elaborate...shouldn't you include in your discussion the changes
in dental thinking in terms of dealing with a "cavity"?  Didn't the
drill of the, say, 1950's remove more healthy tooth structure than
did the "disease"?

  Mark (Ya can stroke each other all ya want, but not in my presence)



Fri, 18 May 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 Amalgam CANNOT be banned in the US.
Hi Ed,

Your post might aswell has been dated Nov 30, 1958 and concerned tobacco.
Back at that time science, specialists, all known research and all available
experts assured governmental bodies and the Public that smoking was safe.
And look what happened.

I do hope amalgam will not be banned in the US. If it was it means that the
manufactureres would go bankrupt, the amalgam plants would have to close as
soon as they will be out of business. Then who to sue? (compare with the
tobacco companies).

Bye for now,
Hans Lennros DDS

PS: What makes you think that today's experts are so much better than the
experts of the fifties? Isn't that just the hybris of mankind to think that
we know all...???

Quote:
>For all the hoopla about amalgam toxicity, there has not been adequate
studies
>which are double-blinded, and with a large enough sample size to show
>convincingly that amalgam restorations are indeed toxic to the human
condition.

>With that said, amalgam use will die--- a natural death.  More and more
>dentists are using the newer generation of composite materials, and the use
of
>amalgam is diminishing year by year.  I have been a dentist serving a
>'high-end' clientele for 20 years,  and over the past few years, the use of
>amalgam has diminished to probably less than 1% of my practice-  not
because
>amalgam is so bad, but because there are so many other restorative
materials
>which do the job better!

>Edward M. Reifman, MS, DDS.



Fri, 18 May 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 Amalgam CANNOT be banned in the US.
Mark,

The answer to your question, 'Didn't the drill of the 1950's remove more
healthy tooth structure than did the 'disease'?  The answer is no.  However,
today, with air abrasion, we are able to remove a bare fraction of 'healthy
tooth material' in removing decay.  Air abrasion is similar to a thin 'laser
beam' in its removal largely of decayed tooth  material and nothing else.  
Incidentally,  us dentists I feel are TOO DARN BUSY!!!.  If there was NO more
decayed teeth from this moment on, I feel every dentist in the country would
still be busy for the next 30 years.  Mark, don't get bogged down with dentists
as being 'drill and fill technicians'.  A much larger percentage of dentists
busy day is treating the following:  teeth broken down from chewing trauma, NOT
decay, abscessed teeth, gum disease (mother nature's final revenge??), TMJ
discomfort, implants, ortho, extractions, {*filter*}diagnosis of pathology such as
AIDS, {*filter*}cancers, etc., repairing broken-down mouths with partials, etc.  

Cheers,

Ed, DDS



Sat, 19 May 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 Amalgam CANNOT be banned in the US.
Gosh, this sounds like a manufacturer/dealer adverti{*filter*}t.
Quote:

>Mark,

>The answer to your question, 'Didn't the drill of the 1950's remove more
>healthy tooth structure than did the 'disease'?  The answer is no.
However,
>today, with air abrasion, we are able to remove a bare fraction of 'healthy

...........als, etc.
Quote:

>Cheers,

>Ed, DDS



Sun, 20 May 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 
 [ 6 post ] 

 Relevant Pages 

1. ADA Powerless To Prevent Amalgam Ban In US?

2. Partial Bans of Amalgams In US States

3. Partial Bans of Amalgams in US States

4. Partical Bans Of Amalgams In US States

5. ADA Powerless To Prevent Amalgam Ban In US?

6. LAW ALONE CANNOT ENFORCE TOBACCO BAN, SAYS MINISTER

7. SURGEON ADVOCATES BAN ON HANDGUNS IN THE U.S.

8. Bill to Ban Chinese Transplant Physicians from U.S.

9. HEART CARE DRUG BANNED IN US ON SALE IN BHARAT

10. Why was Stevia banned in U.S.?

11. 3 COUNTRIES BAN U.S. POULTRY IMPORTS


 
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software