Beryllium in the news 
Author Message
 Beryllium in the news

The White House made an announcement today about compensation for ex-nuclear
workers http://www.***.com/
The whole thing started out because of beryllium disease.

"President Clinton ordered the review after the Energy Department concluded
the government should compensate workers who had developed an incurable lung
disease because of exposure to beryllium, a material used in nuclear weapons
production.
     Richardson and the White House wanted to determine if other nuclear
weapons plant workers likewise should be compensated because of exposure to
plutonium, uranium and a variety of radioactive or highly toxic substances."

The government is going to offer the workers $100,000 or a worker's
compensation-like package of benefits.

What does this have to do with teeth?   Because beryllium is not used just
in atomic energy, it is also used in dental alloys.  Dental workers (and
probably dental patients) are getting sick from this beryllium.  When the
word finally gets out, and it will not be long, I doubt that the government
will be willing to write checks to this new group of victims.
Who will pay?

Regards:
Vaughn



Mon, 30 Sep 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Beryllium in the news


Quote:

> [...]
> : What does this have to do with teeth?   Because beryllium is not used
just
> : in atomic energy, it is also used in dental alloys.  Dental workers (and
> : probably dental patients) are getting sick from this beryllium.  When
the
> : word finally gets out, and it will not be long, I doubt that the
government
> : will be willing to write checks to this new group of victims.
> : Who will pay?

> Watch out near coal burning. Some coal can be high in beryllium. I heard
> of a dairy factory whose coal ash was poisoning the sheep in the fields
> around about. I think they got weak bones.

     Well; that is news to me and I have done quite a bit of research on
beryllium.  As far as I know, beryllium is primarily a hazard to the lungs.
It causes an incurable and progressive lung disease.  There have been cases
of people who live downwind of beryllium plants getting beryllium disease.

Regards:
Vaughn



Mon, 30 Sep 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Beryllium in the news
Everybody can remember great business (since 1955-1980) with "nuclear"
(radioactive) anti-lightning project, but on the end, this was a radioactive
trash (from nuclear electric power stations) soled for such a big money.
That construction's still persist on rooftops on hospitals, ambulances...

--
All the best,
Proka

Quote:




>> [...]
>> : What does this have to do with teeth?   Because beryllium is not used
>just
>> : in atomic energy, it is also used in dental alloys.  Dental workers
(and
>> : probably dental patients) are getting sick from this beryllium.  When
>the
>> : word finally gets out, and it will not be long, I doubt that the
>government
>> : will be willing to write checks to this new group of victims.
>> : Who will pay?

>> Watch out near coal burning. Some coal can be high in beryllium. I heard
>> of a dairy factory whose coal ash was poisoning the sheep in the fields
>> around about. I think they got weak bones.

>     Well; that is news to me and I have done quite a bit of research on
>beryllium.  As far as I know, beryllium is primarily a hazard to the lungs.
>It causes an incurable and progressive lung disease.  There have been cases
>of people who live downwind of beryllium plants getting beryllium disease.

>Regards:
>Vaughn



Mon, 30 Sep 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Beryllium in the news
[...]
: What does this have to do with teeth?   Because beryllium is not used just
: in atomic energy, it is also used in dental alloys.  Dental workers (and
: probably dental patients) are getting sick from this beryllium.  When the
: word finally gets out, and it will not be long, I doubt that the government
: will be willing to write checks to this new group of victims.
: Who will pay?

Watch out near coal burning. Some coal can be high in beryllium. I heard
of a dairy factory whose coal ash was poisoning the sheep in the fields
around about. I think they got weak bones.



Tue, 01 Oct 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Beryllium in the news

Quote:

>Everybody can remember great business (since 1955-1980) with "nuclear"
>(radioactive) anti-lightning project, but on the end, this was a
radioactive
>trash (from nuclear electric power stations) soled for such a big money.
>That construction's still persist on rooftops on hospitals, ambulances...

>--
>All the best,
>Proka

Proka:
     Brian talks about limping sheep, now you tell me about overpriced
nuclear waste stored on rooftops...This thread is certainly generating some
eclectic responses.

Wondering what will come next...
Vaughn

Quote:





>>> [...]
>>> : What does this have to do with teeth?   Because beryllium is not used
>>just
>>> : in atomic energy, it is also used in dental alloys.  Dental workers
>(and
>>> : probably dental patients) are getting sick from this beryllium.  When
>>the
>>> : word finally gets out, and it will not be long, I doubt that the
>>government
>>> : will be willing to write checks to this new group of victims.
>>> : Who will pay?

>>> Watch out near coal burning. Some coal can be high in beryllium. I heard
>>> of a dairy factory whose coal ash was poisoning the sheep in the fields
>>> around about. I think they got weak bones.

>>     Well; that is news to me and I have done quite a bit of research on
>>beryllium.  As far as I know, beryllium is primarily a hazard to the
lungs.
>>It causes an incurable and progressive lung disease.  There have been
cases
>>of people who live downwind of beryllium plants getting beryllium disease.

>>Regards:
>>Vaughn



Tue, 01 Oct 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Beryllium in the news

Quote:

>     Brian talks about limping sheep,

In this country, that warrants an investigation of the farmer . . . .
Quote:
> now you tell me about overpriced
>nuclear waste stored on rooftops...This thread is certainly generating some
>eclectic responses.
>Wondering what will come next...
>Vaughn





>>>> [...]
>>>> : What does this have to do with teeth?   Because beryllium is not used
>>>just
>>>> : in atomic energy, it is also used in dental alloys.  Dental workers
>>(and
>>>> : probably dental patients) are getting sick from this beryllium.  When
>>>the
>>>> : word finally gets out, and it will not be long, I doubt that the
>>>government
>>>> : will be willing to write checks to this new group of victims.
>>>> : Who will pay?

>>>> Watch out near coal burning. Some coal can be high in beryllium. I heard
>>>> of a dairy factory whose coal ash was poisoning the sheep in the fields
>>>> around about. I think they got weak bones.

>>>     Well; that is news to me and I have done quite a bit of research on
>>>beryllium.  As far as I know, beryllium is primarily a hazard to the
>lungs.
>>>It causes an incurable and progressive lung disease.  There have been
>cases
>>>of people who live downwind of beryllium plants getting beryllium disease.

>>>Regards:
>>>Vaughn



Tue, 01 Oct 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Beryllium in the news


:>     Brian talks about limping sheep,

I was told weak bones, maybe they were breaking because of the
osteosarcomas induced by the high beryllium diet from coal ash on pasture.

: In this country, that warrants an investigation of the farmer . . . .

Record in GeoRef Disc 1: 1785-1974
   TITLE
          Beryllium content of American coals.
   AUTHORS
          Stadnichenko-Taisia-M; Zubovic-Peter; Sheffey-Nola-B
   SOURCE
          U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin. Pages 253-295. 1961. .
   PUBLISHER
          U. S. Geological Survey. Reston, VA, United States. 1961.
   PUBLICATION YEAR
          1961
   LANGUAGE
          English
   ABSTRACT
          The results of spectrochemical analyses of 1,385 coal ash
          samples suggest a significant distribution pattern for Be. The
          highest average Be content of coal ash (62 p.p.m.) was found in
          the Appalachian region. An average content of Be in ash of 49
          p.p.m. was found in the Interior province. This figure for the
          Interior province is very close to the average for all the coal
          samples studied, 46 p.p.m. The average Be content of the
          samples from the northern Great Plains and Rocky Mountain
          provinces is about one-half the average for all the coal ash
          samples examined. Considerable variation in Be concentration
          exists within each of the provinces. In the Eastern province
          very high concentrations of Be in ash are found in eastern
          Kentucky (0.067% and 0.081%). In the Interior province, the
          Eastern region has a higher Be content in the coal beds along
          the N. and SE. edges and a lower content in the central parts;
          in the Western region, the coal beds of the McAlester basin
          (Oklahoma and Arkansas) have a much lower content of the
          element than do the coal beds of the central and northern parts
          of the region. In the northern Great Plains province a similar
          distribution is found; the coal beds of the Great Falls and the
          Lewistown fields have a much higher Be content than do those of
          the rest of this province. Large variations are found in
          concentrations of Be in different samples of the same bed. The
          Be content of bed 5 of Illinois ranges from 0.0011% (9.52% ash)
          to 0.0050% (6.52% ash). Similar variations are noted in other
[...]

I amn not sure of the level in various New Zealand coals.

:> now you tell me about overpriced
:>nuclear waste stored on rooftops...This thread is certainly generating some
:>eclectic responses.

Presumably the roof top stuff refers to solar energy collection. It could
be done on road surfaces, too.

:>Wondering what will come next...
:>Vaughn

Emissions from coal fired power stations have been very much cleaned up,
I think.



Tue, 01 Oct 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Beryllium in the news
Brian:
     Thank you for that reference.  I will add it to my collection.  Hope
you don't mind a bit of humor.

Regards:
Vaughn


Quote:


> :>     Brian talks about limping sheep,

> I was told weak bones, maybe they were breaking because of the
> osteosarcomas induced by the high beryllium diet from coal ash on pasture.

> : In this country, that warrants an investigation of the farmer . . . .

> Record in GeoRef Disc 1: 1785-1974
>    TITLE
>           Beryllium content of American coals.
>    AUTHORS
>           Stadnichenko-Taisia-M; Zubovic-Peter; Sheffey-Nola-B
>    SOURCE
>           U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin. Pages 253-295. 1961. .
>    PUBLISHER
>           U. S. Geological Survey. Reston, VA, United States. 1961.
>    PUBLICATION YEAR
>           1961
>    LANGUAGE
>           English
>    ABSTRACT
>           The results of spectrochemical analyses of 1,385 coal ash
>           samples suggest a significant distribution pattern for Be. The
>           highest average Be content of coal ash (62 p.p.m.) was found in
>           the Appalachian region. An average content of Be in ash of 49
>           p.p.m. was found in the Interior province. This figure for the
>           Interior province is very close to the average for all the coal
>           samples studied, 46 p.p.m. The average Be content of the
>           samples from the northern Great Plains and Rocky Mountain
>           provinces is about one-half the average for all the coal ash
>           samples examined. Considerable variation in Be concentration
>           exists within each of the provinces. In the Eastern province
>           very high concentrations of Be in ash are found in eastern
>           Kentucky (0.067% and 0.081%). In the Interior province, the
>           Eastern region has a higher Be content in the coal beds along
>           the N. and SE. edges and a lower content in the central parts;
>           in the Western region, the coal beds of the McAlester basin
>           (Oklahoma and Arkansas) have a much lower content of the
>           element than do the coal beds of the central and northern parts
>           of the region. In the northern Great Plains province a similar
>           distribution is found; the coal beds of the Great Falls and the
>           Lewistown fields have a much higher Be content than do those of
>           the rest of this province. Large variations are found in
>           concentrations of Be in different samples of the same bed. The
>           Be content of bed 5 of Illinois ranges from 0.0011% (9.52% ash)
>           to 0.0050% (6.52% ash). Similar variations are noted in other
> [...]

> I amn not sure of the level in various New Zealand coals.

> :> now you tell me about overpriced
> :>nuclear waste stored on rooftops...This thread is certainly generating
some
> :>eclectic responses.

> Presumably the roof top stuff refers to solar energy collection. It could
> be done on road surfaces, too.

> :>Wondering what will come next...
> :>Vaughn

> Emissions from coal fired power stations have been very much cleaned up,
> I think.



Tue, 01 Oct 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Beryllium in the news
: Brian:
:      Thank you for that reference.  I will add it to my collection.  Hope
: you don't mind a bit of humor.

Of course the amounts of beryllium dentists would be subject to may be
very tiny.

I am wondering what form it would be in teeth. The tendency is to think,
`beryllium placed in bones produces sarcoma, therefore don't use it.' But
I wonder whether tiny trace amounts may be useful.



Wed, 02 Oct 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 
 [ 9 post ] 

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