MRI/CT Vs Pet Scan 
Author Message
 MRI/CT Vs Pet Scan

Hello All,

What is a MRI/CT (especially the CT portion)?

Which is better it or a pet scan?

---
Thank you very much,

Father Time



Sun, 21 Aug 2005 10:20:27 GMT
 MRI/CT Vs Pet Scan
MRI magnetic resonance imaging  http://www.drhull.com/EncyMaster/M/MRI.html
CT Computed Axial Tomography   http://www.imaginis.com/ct-scan/history.asp
pet Positron Emission Tomography
http://www.falange.demon.co.uk/explain-petscan.htm

I like the MRI, no X rays are used. Each test has its reasons to be used.
Deciding which is beyond my scope. Some of the links I gave you should
explain more.
Kevin H.


Quote:
> Hello All,

> What is a MRI/CT (especially the CT portion)?

> Which is better it or a pet scan?

> ---
> Thank you very much,

> Father Time



Sun, 21 Aug 2005 10:53:16 GMT
 MRI/CT Vs Pet Scan
Father Juan Valdez,
By the way, I still think if you want to know, you should find someone that
does a LOT of stress echos and have them do one on you. Have you ever had an
echo? If you image well, specifically if your inferior wall images well, you
should consider it. Maybe get a regular resting echo first and ask the tech
if you image well. If they have a new machine like I just got with
harmonics, I bet they will see just fine.  The CT scans and even the
Angiograms all need to use x-rays on you. The ultrasound has no known
harmful effects at the power levels we use.  Keep in mind that if any of
these tests show another abnormality then you are faced with deciding
whether or not to go get an angiogram. The angiogram will settle the matter
once and for all. Considering Dr. Chungs comment on the complication rate of
them and your level of curiosity, maybe you should just have the darn
angiogram and get on with your life. Another issue to consider is that your
insurance may pay for the angiogram but not another expensive non invasive
test.  I would bet 500 bucks right now that you are fine. I wouldn't however
bet my life on it ;)
Kevin H.



Quote:
> MRI magnetic resonance imaging

http://www.drhull.com/EncyMaster/M/MRI.html
Quote:
> CT Computed Axial Tomography   http://www.imaginis.com/ct-scan/history.asp
> pet Positron Emission Tomography
> http://www.falange.demon.co.uk/explain-petscan.htm

> I like the MRI, no X rays are used. Each test has its reasons to be used.
> Deciding which is beyond my scope. Some of the links I gave you should
> explain more.
> Kevin H.



> > Hello All,

> > What is a MRI/CT (especially the CT portion)?

> > Which is better it or a pet scan?

> > ---
> > Thank you very much,

> > Father Time



Sun, 21 Aug 2005 13:43:38 GMT
 MRI/CT Vs Pet Scan
Kevin & All,

Quote:
>I would bet 500 bucks right now
> that you are fine. I wouldn't
>however bet my life on it.

This is my mind frame as well.

Still, I am way overwight (5' 10" 255 lbs) and did get dizzy on one bike
ride (83 miles).  I rode 96 miles on New Years day but did not push it as
hard and I did not get dizzy.  Sunday, I rode 87 miles and went to a
spinning class yesterday.   I do not look like a person that should be able
to do this but with a bad hip (avascular necrosis) this is my best
rehab/exercise (it has beome a passion).

I likewise, do not want to damage my body.

Can fear cause a sudden and substained change in BP?

I called my GP and cardiologist for my BP records and it was consistently
120/80 without medication until after the stress test.  I did not feel good
after this test and my BP was 160/88 two days later.  It was still high at
subsequent readings.  Yesterday, I went to the fire dept. and it was 130/80
on meds.

I lost trust in my first doctor because of the way that he spoke to me and
and all that he did not tell me.

I am getting my records Monday and going to a new doctor once I have these
in hand.

This time I want to understand what my options are.

My insurance company will cover a pet scan.  There are many place in
Jacksonville to have this done.

Then I found

"Revolutionary Imaging Provides Precise Early Diagnosis of Cardiac Disease"

http://www.***.com/

I spoke to Dr. Wilke and he spoke about doing the CT portion first and then
doing the MRI if required.

This confused me because I do not understand how the CT works.

I am weighing the MRI/CT against a pet Scan for which would give better
insight.

I have posted the full article below for comments and insights.

----
Kind Regards

Father Time

Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is
proving to be more effective in the initial
diagnosis and management of coronary artery
disease, says Norbert Wilke, MD, UF associate
professor of radiology/cardiology and chief of
cardiovascular MR/CT at Shands Jacksonville.
Uses of MRI/CT Scanning
Cardiac MRI uses radio frequency pulses and
magnetic fields to provide remarkably clear
and detailed pictures of internal organs and
tissues. "Cardiac MRI can help physicians
look at the structure and function of the heart
more quickly and thoroughly than with other
imaging methods, allowing for a precise,
noninvasive diagnosis of cardiac disease,"
explains Wilke, who is among a handful of
physicians worldwide involved in pioneering
and teaching this new technique. He will start
an interdisciplinary cardiac MRI imaging
training program for physicians, fellows and
residents early next year.
A novel cardiac image approach at Shands
Jacksonville will be the combined use of
cardiac MRI and multi-detector, high-speed
cardiac CT (computer tomography) scanners
for optimized risk assessment of coronary
artery disease. The Cardiovascular Center at
Shands Jacksonville is also leading a new
initiative using MRI/CT for optimal
management of patients with atypical chest
pain as well as coronary artery disease risk
assessment. In addition, there are plans to use
cardiac MRI to measure the success of new
treatments in patients with cardiovascular
disease through participation in international
clinical drug trials.
Patient-friendly Imaging
Unique to Shands Jacksonville is the fact that
both radiologists and cardiologists work in a
combined departmental effort to interpret the
outcome of a patient's MRI examination. As a
result, physicians can come up with more
accurate results for the patient.
Additional patient benefits of cardiac MRI are
no exposure to radiation like X-rays and the
use of safe contrast agents, which may be
necessary to enhance the assessment of
myocardial {*filter*} flow or the visibility of the
heart's chambers and major vessels. Dedicated
cardiac MRI systems are also more patientfriendly
than conventional MRI units because
they image much faster, tend to be wider and
shorter and don't enclose the patient as much
as regular body MRI scanners used in the past.
For more information about cardiac MRI and
CT, call (904) 244-8723.
Norbert Wilke, MD, with one of the new
cardiac MRI imaging units that image faster
and are more patient-friendly.



Sun, 21 Aug 2005 19:40:57 GMT
 MRI/CT Vs Pet Scan
The CT scan of your heart is a waste of time. It will tell if there is
plaque but not if it is causing a problem. You need a better test.  Don't
get the CT.  Even if your bp was constantly 120/80 I would think that the
diastolic portion was a bit high. When you run on a treadmill what does your
{*filter*} pressure do? Does it go abnormally high? BP should rise during stress
or during exercise. (the systolic portion should rise but not over 200 or
so) The diastolic pressure should drop or stay the same. You need to find
this out by doing a treadmill without being on any BP meds for at least a
day. If you had a stress echo, that would answer all of your questions. The
pet scan wont do that for you.
Kevin H.



Quote:
> Kevin & All,

> >I would bet 500 bucks right now
> > that you are fine. I wouldn't
> >however bet my life on it.

> This is my mind frame as well.

> Still, I am way overwight (5' 10" 255 lbs) and did get dizzy on one bike
> ride (83 miles).  I rode 96 miles on New Years day but did not push it as
> hard and I did not get dizzy.  Sunday, I rode 87 miles and went to a
> spinning class yesterday.   I do not look like a person that should be
able
> to do this but with a bad hip (avascular necrosis) this is my best
> rehab/exercise (it has beome a passion).

> I likewise, do not want to damage my body.

> Can fear cause a sudden and substained change in BP?

> I called my GP and cardiologist for my BP records and it was consistently
> 120/80 without medication until after the stress test.  I did not feel
good
> after this test and my BP was 160/88 two days later.  It was still high at
> subsequent readings.  Yesterday, I went to the fire dept. and it was
130/80
> on meds.

> I lost trust in my first doctor because of the way that he spoke to me and
> and all that he did not tell me.

> I am getting my records Monday and going to a new doctor once I have these
> in hand.

> This time I want to understand what my options are.

> My insurance company will cover a pet scan.  There are many place in
> Jacksonville to have this done.

> Then I found

> "Revolutionary Imaging Provides Precise Early Diagnosis of Cardiac
Disease"

> http://www.***.com/

> I spoke to Dr. Wilke and he spoke about doing the CT portion first and
then
> doing the MRI if required.

> This confused me because I do not understand how the CT works.

> I am weighing the MRI/CT against a pet Scan for which would give better
> insight.

> I have posted the full article below for comments and insights.

> ----
> Kind Regards

> Father Time

> Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is
> proving to be more effective in the initial
> diagnosis and management of coronary artery
> disease, says Norbert Wilke, MD, UF associate
> professor of radiology/cardiology and chief of
> cardiovascular MR/CT at Shands Jacksonville.
> Uses of MRI/CT Scanning
> Cardiac MRI uses radio frequency pulses and
> magnetic fields to provide remarkably clear
> and detailed pictures of internal organs and
> tissues. "Cardiac MRI can help physicians
> look at the structure and function of the heart
> more quickly and thoroughly than with other
> imaging methods, allowing for a precise,
> noninvasive diagnosis of cardiac disease,"
> explains Wilke, who is among a handful of
> physicians worldwide involved in pioneering
> and teaching this new technique. He will start
> an interdisciplinary cardiac MRI imaging
> training program for physicians, fellows and
> residents early next year.
> A novel cardiac image approach at Shands
> Jacksonville will be the combined use of
> cardiac MRI and multi-detector, high-speed
> cardiac CT (computer tomography) scanners
> for optimized risk assessment of coronary
> artery disease. The Cardiovascular Center at
> Shands Jacksonville is also leading a new
> initiative using MRI/CT for optimal
> management of patients with atypical chest
> pain as well as coronary artery disease risk
> assessment. In addition, there are plans to use
> cardiac MRI to measure the success of new
> treatments in patients with cardiovascular
> disease through participation in international
> clinical drug trials.
> Patient-friendly Imaging
> Unique to Shands Jacksonville is the fact that
> both radiologists and cardiologists work in a
> combined departmental effort to interpret the
> outcome of a patient's MRI examination. As a
> result, physicians can come up with more
> accurate results for the patient.
> Additional patient benefits of cardiac MRI are
> no exposure to radiation like X-rays and the
> use of safe contrast agents, which may be
> necessary to enhance the assessment of
> myocardial {*filter*} flow or the visibility of the
> heart's chambers and major vessels. Dedicated
> cardiac MRI systems are also more patientfriendly
> than conventional MRI units because
> they image much faster, tend to be wider and
> shorter and don't enclose the patient as much
> as regular body MRI scanners used in the past.
> For more information about cardiac MRI and
> CT, call (904) 244-8723.
> Norbert Wilke, MD, with one of the new
> cardiac MRI imaging units that image faster
> and are more patient-friendly.



Mon, 22 Aug 2005 07:38:24 GMT
 
 [ 5 post ] 

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