New heart-disease test shows promise in study July 8 05 
Author Message
 New heart-disease test shows promise in study July 8 05

Hope this is not  redundant.

Bill

............................

New heart-disease test shows promise in study
UCSD researchers focus on {*filter*} fats
By Cheryl Clark
UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER
July 7, 2005
A new UCSD test might eventually help doctors determine the earliest
signs of heart disease.
The procedure, described today in the New England Journal of Medicine,
looks at how two types of fat in the {*filter*}stream work together to clog
arteries  the main cause of heart attacks.
Patients who had high levels of these fats, phospholipids, but normal
levels of "bad" cholesterol, LDL, were three times as likely to have a
blockage as patients with normal levels of phospholipids, the
researchers found.
People with high levels of LDL and phospholipids were 16 times as likely
to have a blockage of more than 50 percent of an artery's diameter, said
Dr. Sotirios "Sam" Tsimikas, director of vascular medicine and an
interventional cardiologist at the University of California San Diego.
The results were especially prominent in patients younger than 60.
Tsimikas, principal author of the study, collaborated with Joseph
Witztum and Elizabeth Miller of the UCSD School of Medicine and
researchers at the Mayo Clinic and Duke University.
Heart-disease tests
The following are some tests performed to determine heart-disease risk.
Each procedure is used in conjunction with other tests and indicators  
such as body mass index, {*filter*} pressure and glucose tolerance  to
evaluate a person's cardiovascular health.
{*filter*} tests
 Cholesterol tests measure LDL ("bad" cholesterol), HDL ("good"
cholesterol) and triglyercides, or concentrated fats that in excess
amounts can be bad for the heart.
 The VAP (Vertical Auto Profile) Test, NMR LipoProfile Test and Berkeley
HeartLab profile go beyond standard cholesterol tests. They also measure
subclasses of cholesterol that may play important roles in preventing or
causing heart disease. Generally not covered by insurance plans.
 C-reactive protein, or CRP, tests detect a component in {*filter*} that
emerges in response to inflammation in arterial walls, a process linked
to heart disease.
 The amino acid homocysteine is a building block of protein. At high
levels, this {*filter*} component can contribute to plaque buildup in the
{*filter*} vessels. Sometimes the homocysteine excess is inherited, but
vitamin B deficiency, smoking, kidney disease and some {*filter*} can raise
homocysteine levels, too.
Ultrasound and other scanning devices
 CIMT (carotid intima-media thickness) ultrasound measures the thickness
of the inner wall of the carotid arteries, the vessels that route {*filter*}
flow to the brain. Thickening could cause blockage. This test requires a
specialized laboratory.
 Coronary Calcium Score, also known as Electron Beam Computed
Tomography, is performed by a CT scanner to measure the amount of
calcium deposits in coronary arteries. These deposits can indicate the
amount of plaque buildup in the arteries. Procedure may not be covered
by insurance.
Exercise tests
 The treadmill stress test is sometimes combined with an echocardiogram
or a nuclear profusion scan. These techniques allow doctors to detect
the presence of arterial blockages.

While scientists have a poor understanding of the biochemical processes
that damage heart vessels, they have been learning more about how
various types of cholesterol affect cardiovascular health.
An important finding from the UCSD study concerned the role of lp(a), a
little understood compound circulating in the {*filter*}stream that binds to
{*filter*} vessel walls and might act with phospholipids to cause
inflammatory damage.
The study involved analysis of {*filter*} from 504 patients who came to the
Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., after experiencing heart disease
symptoms serious enough to justify an exploratory angiogram, in which a
catheter is inserted into coronary arteries to detect vessel narrowing
and plaque buildup.
Tsimikas and his colleagues examined the {*filter*} taken from these patients
without knowing which people had vessel blockages. Their findings were
compared with what Mayo Clinic physicians discovered from performing the
patients' angiograms.
Tsimikas emphasized that further studies are needed to confirm today's
published findings.
Even if the phospholipids test is validated, it would most likely be
used in conjunction with other procedures for measuring "good" and "bad"
cholesterol. Doctors also would consider factors such as family history,
smoking and other lifestyle habits that could influence heart conditions.
In an editorial in the same issue of the journal, Dr. Judith Berliner,
professor of medicine and pathology at UCLA's David Geffen School of
Medicine, said Tsimikas' study is "the first to establish a causal
connection between the levels of oxidized phospholipids and the risk of
coronary artery disease."
Momtaf Wassef, head of the federal National Heart, Lung, and {*filter*}
Institute's Atherosclerosis Research Group, which provided some of the
money for the study, said Tsimikas' test is important but "not ready for
prime time."
"The idea people need to recognize is that coronary artery disease is a
constellation of diseases with a lot of varied factors," Wassef said.
"But this could be added as one more test that would be performed."


--
 Garden Shade Zone 5 in a Japanese Jungle manner.
FAIR USE NOTICE: This may contain copyrighted (? ) material the use of
which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright
owner. Such material is made available for educational purposes, to
advance understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral,
ethical, and social justice issues, etc. It is believed that this
constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided
for in Title 17 U.S.C. section 107 of the US Copyright Law. This
material is distributed without profit.



Tue, 25 Dec 2007 23:59:40 GMT
 New heart-disease test shows promise in study July 8 05


Quote:

> Hope this is not  redundant.

> Bill

New test? Are you referring to the VAP that includes Lp(a)?
It was devised in 2002. Mayo clinic laboratories is one of the distributors.
They don't perform it.


Wed, 26 Dec 2007 00:58:44 GMT
 New heart-disease test shows promise in study July 8 05

Quote:



> > Hope this is not  redundant.

> > Bill

> New test? Are you referring to the VAP that includes Lp(a)?
> It was devised in 2002. Mayo clinic laboratories is one of the distributors.
> They don't perform it.

I thought the article spoke for it self dates July 8 05.
Your repley says no thing  by comparison.

Bill

--
 Garden Shade Zone 5 in a Japanese Jungle manner.
FAIR USE NOTICE: This may contain copyrighted (? ) material the use of
which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright
owner. Such material is made available for educational purposes, to
advance understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral,
ethical, and social justice issues, etc. It is believed that this
constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided
for in Title 17 U.S.C. section 107 of the US Copyright Law. This
material is distributed without profit.



Wed, 26 Dec 2007 01:09:40 GMT
 New heart-disease test shows promise in study July 8 05


Quote:




> > > Hope this is not  redundant.

> > > Bill

> > New test? Are you referring to the VAP that includes Lp(a)?
> > It was devised in 2002. Mayo clinic laboratories is one of the
distributors.
> > They don't perform it.

> I thought the article spoke for it self dates July 8 05.
> Your repley says no thing  by comparison.

> Bill

That's for the answer to my question Bill


Wed, 26 Dec 2007 02:22:55 GMT
 
 [ 4 post ] 

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