thallium stress test question 
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 thallium stress test question

How long will the thallium remain in my system from this test? Are there any
side effects from the thallium?


Mon, 25 Jun 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 thallium stress test question

Quote:
>How long will the thallium remain in my system from this test? Are there any
>side effects from the thallium?

From my understanding there are no side effects to the use of thallium during
the stress test and the thallium itself (it is *not* a dye but a chemical
containing trace amounts of radioactivity) is dissolved in your body about 2 to
3 hours after it is injected (that is the purpose of the follow up films which
are taken about 2 hours after the intitial test - to monitor the heart's
responses when it is free of the {*filter*} influence).

Incidentally, they now have a new combination persantine/thallium stress test
that eliminates the need for the traditional treadmill, allowing patients such
as the elderly or disabled who are unable to walk or raise their heart rate up
to the desired level the old fashioned way, to benefit from this procedure.
It's done in much the same way except the persantine serves to dilate the
coronary arteries and increase {*filter*} flow to the heart, achieving results that
are similar to what would normally occur when a person is exercising
vigorously. The thallium, of course, along with the camera functions as per
usual, showing blocked areas of {*filter*} flow to the heart.  Of course, if you're
reasonably healthy and able to walk the treadmill, it's unlikely this
alternative will be offered to you.

Mercedes



Tue, 26 Jun 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 thallium stress test question

Quote:

> How long will the thallium remain in my system from this test? Are there any
> side effects from the thallium?

It is my understanding that this particular radioisotope has a short half-life and most of
it is totally gone from your system in 24 hours.  There are no side effects that I am
aware of.

alvena
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Tue, 26 Jun 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 thallium stress test question

Quote:

>How long will the thallium remain in my system from this test? Are there any
>side effects from the thallium?

I have had both thallium and cardiolyte scans without side effects. I am
trained as a physicist, but have been unable to learn much of what actually
goes on during these scans. There are three imaging techniques which appear
to be closely related and are based on the angular distribution of gamma
photons originating within the cardiac tissues which preferentially absorb
the injected salts. The thallium scan injects a saline solution of a salt of
thallium which contains an artificially (reactor) produced radioactive isotope
of the thallium nucleus. A somewhat similar tomography injects something
called cardiolyte which is based on a radioactive isotope of the Technetium
nucleus. A third technique called pet stands for positron emission tomography.
I would really like to know more of the physics of each of these tomographies.
Can anyone point me to a concise source? None of these things is cheap!


Tue, 26 Jun 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 thallium stress test question
A thallium stress test involves the injection of a radio-active isotope
(there is no medication involved) The side-effects would be akin to an xray
(in which you are bomb-barded with charged particles).

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Thu, 28 Jun 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 thallium stress test question

Quote:

>A thallium stress test involves the injection of a radio-active isotope
>(there is no medication involved) The side-effects would be akin to an xray
>(in which you are bomb-barded with charged particles).

NO! There are not charged particles. Both x-ray and thallium scans detect
electromagnetic radiation. YES! The biological consequences of thallium scan
and x-ray should be similar.


Sun, 01 Jul 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 thallium stress test question

Quote:
>called cardiolyte which is based on a radioactive isotope of the Technetium
>nucleus. A third technique called pet stands for positron emission tomography.
>I would really like to know more of the physics of each of these tomographies.
>Can anyone point me to a concise source? None of these things is cheap!

The method of data acquisition with thallium and technetium is know as
SPECT (Single Photon Computed Tomography). Although planar acquisition
techniques can also be used. Reconstruction is usually with filtered
back projection but some iterative algorithms are becoming popular.

Graham Wright

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from the address.



Mon, 02 Jul 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 
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