regurgitating mitral valve prolapse vs. Regurgitating aortic valve: 
Author Message
 regurgitating mitral valve prolapse vs. Regurgitating aortic valve:

can anyone give me some information on regurgitating mitral valve prolapse and
regurgitating aortic valves, as well as their significance?


Sun, 03 Oct 2004 10:56:10 GMT
 regurgitating mitral valve prolapse vs. Regurgitating aortic valve:

Quote:

> can anyone give me some information on regurgitating mitral valve prolapse and
> regurgitating aortic valves, as well as their significance?

Endocarditis prophylaxis is indicated in either case.  In severe cases, either can
lead to heart failure so surgical repair or replacement may also be indicated.

--
Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
Atlanta Cardiologist
http://www.heartmdphd.com



Sun, 03 Oct 2004 11:28:14 GMT
 regurgitating mitral valve prolapse vs. Regurgitating aortic valve:

Quote:
> can anyone give me some information on regurgitating mitral valve prolapse
and
> regurgitating aortic valves, as well as their significance?

The significance is that they prevent the heart from working at maximum
capacity.  Depending on their severity and duration, they can cause further
cardiac complications, including cardiac failure (leading to shortness of
breath and reduced exercise tolerance), death, etc.  The basic treatment
options are conservative (don't do much because it's not that bad),
pharmacological (support the heart so it doesn't fail, prevent infection
from complicating things), surgical (definitive treatment but has
significant issues for the patient's future).


Sun, 03 Oct 2004 15:33:00 GMT
 regurgitating mitral valve prolapse vs. Regurgitating aortic valve:
i had MVP with severe regurg, which eventually led to a diagnosis of heart
failure. in this case it's probably not so wise to assume that you can take
{*filter*} to help the heart. my experience was that the mechanical problem
worsened over time, leading to increased risk and discomfort.

luckily, i found a very competent surgeon who (1) understood the condition
well, (2) could perform the necessary mechanical repair procedure, and (3)
did it without sternotomy to radically improve the healing time.

the result was a gigantic improvement in the quality of my life, in
comparison to the heart drug program.

my advice: please get multiple opinions from heart surgeons who attended
different good medical schools and who are resident in different heart
specialty clinics.
--
Dave Mausner / v.708-848-2775 / f.708-848-2569


Quote:
> can anyone give me some information on regurgitating mitral valve prolapse
and
> regurgitating aortic valves, as well as their significance?



Mon, 04 Oct 2004 02:43:05 GMT
 regurgitating mitral valve prolapse vs. Regurgitating aortic valve:
On Wed, 17 Apr 2002 18:43:05 GMT, "Dave Mausner"

"
, (2) could perform the necessary mechanical repair procedure, and (3)

Quote:
>did it without sternotomy to radically improve the healing time."

>Can you explain what you mean by this.  Did you get a replacement mechanical

valve without  the major incision in the chest? I will be having
repair or replacement (mitral) at a famous London hospital  but expect

it to be done the standard way. At the same time the surgeon will try
to fix the AF.   Thanks, Diana



Tue, 05 Oct 2004 00:10:09 GMT
 regurgitating mitral valve prolapse vs. Regurgitating aortic valve:

Quote:
> On Wed, 17 Apr 2002 18:43:05 GMT, "Dave Mausner"

> "
> , (2) could perform the necessary mechanical repair procedure, and (3)
> >did it without sternotomy to radically improve the healing time."

> >Can you explain what you mean by this.

both mitral and aortic valves can be repaired or replaced using two
approaches to entering the chest: sternotomy or minimally-invasive.

most folks have the sternotomy. they cut you open right down the middle,
breaking the {*filter*} bone, which must then be wired back together. although
the open-heart procedures have a success rate above 98%, the healing of the
sternum is very prolonged and painful (usually). time to restoration of
normal activity is given as two to three MONTHS.

the minimally invasive approach was pioneered in europe and is slowly
becoming more common in the US. the surgeon makes a slice between the ribs,
on your right for the mitral and on the left for the aortic. this doesn't
break any bones and creates much less trauma for you. when you're done, it
feels a bit like you just played a very rough football game, inasmuch as
your ribs will be taped up in some form. the healing time is two to three
WEEKS.

in my case, i was walking and shopping at one week after surgery, and back
at my desk at work three weeks after surgery.

you should ask about it, because it will make you heal faster and appreciate
the result of your heart repair sooner. special surgical skills are required
to perform the m-i approach. most surgeons offer excuses not to perform m-i,
because they have not received training in it. if you can locate a clinic
which will evaluate your case with the prospect of m-i, i assure you it's
worth the effort.

dave at +1-708-848-2569



Tue, 05 Oct 2004 02:27:37 GMT
 regurgitating mitral valve prolapse vs. Regurgitating aortic valve:

Quote:
>to perform the m-i approach. most surgeons offer excuses not to perform m-i,
>because they have not received training in it. if you can locate a clinic
>which will evaluate your case with
>the prospect of m-i, i assure you it's
>worth the effor

       Dave, can you tell me which clinic you had yours done and( if you don't
mind revealing such information), who the doctor was?


Tue, 05 Oct 2004 13:44:59 GMT
 regurgitating mitral valve prolapse vs. Regurgitating aortic valve:

Quote:
> the minimally invasive approach was pioneered in europe and is slowly
> becoming more common in the US. the surgeon makes a slice between the
ribs,
> on your right for the mitral and on the left for the aortic.

Whoa!  Mitral valve can be left or right but usually on the left.

Quote:
> this doesn't break any bones

I've personally broken 3 ribs in two operations assisting in the lateral
thoracic approach.  That's common.

Quote:
> you should ask about it, because it will make you heal faster and
appreciate
> the result of your heart repair sooner. special surgical skills are
required
> to perform the m-i approach. most surgeons offer excuses not to perform
m-i,
> because they have not received training in it. if you can locate a clinic
> which will evaluate your case with the prospect of m-i, i assure you it's
> worth the effort.

Don't knock a sternotomy.  The postoperative course is a {*filter*}, yes, but
from the surgeon's point of view it's the most natural approach.  I don't
know how the complication rate compares, but I wouldn't be surprised if
sternotomy (+/- bypass) is still the gold standard.


Tue, 05 Oct 2004 22:36:45 GMT
 
 [ 8 post ] 

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