Herbal Utility (resembles: herbalife ...) 
Author Message
 Herbal Utility (resembles: herbalife ...)

Quote:

>They wouldn't deal with the mosquitos directly, but with taking toxins
>in the {*filter*} out of the system through perspiration.

No, bleeding the victim (excuse me, patient) is a MUCH more efficient
way to remove "toxins" from the system. Leeches are a good way to
accomplish this.

Plus, {*filter*}letting will help bring  the humours back into balance.

Isn't science wonderful?

--


 Past Chairman, The Bay Area Skeptics - for whom I speak only when authorized!

       "Simply follow nature, Rousseau declares. Sade, laughing,
        grimly agrees."          - Camille Paglia, "{*filter*} Personae"



Sat, 16 Jul 1994 06:42:38 GMT
 Herbal Utility (resembles: herbalife ...)

Quote:

>I will concede that bacterial diseases are a traditionally weak area for
>Chinese methods - that's why most acupuncturists don't make these primary
>areas of emphasis.

Well, that's one way of putting it.  Another way might be the observation
that most of the diseases that alternative medicine specializes in are
those for which there is no effective western treatment.  When there
is such treatment, people won't bother with the far-out stuff.  I'm
sure traditional Chinese medicine had as many treatments for bacterial
diseases as they did for anything else, and probably made the same
sorts of claims about them.  Now that we have penicillin, nobody bothers
with herbs for bacterial illness.  Now the herbalists treat things like
tinnitus and inoperable cancer.

--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Gordon Banks  N3JXP      | "I have given you an argument; I am not obliged

----------------------------------------------------------------------------



Sun, 17 Jul 1994 01:26:34 GMT
 Herbal Utility (resembles: herbalife ...)

Quote:

>>They wouldn't deal with the mosquitos directly, but with taking toxins
>>in the {*filter*} out of the system through perspiration.

>No, bleeding the victim (excuse me, patient) is a MUCH more efficient
>way to remove "toxins" from the system. Leeches are a good way to
>accomplish this.

>Plus, {*filter*}letting will help bring  the humours back into balance.

>Isn't science wonderful?

What has that to do with science?  The use of leeches and {*filter*}letting
is an old folk treatment.  Aristotle's medical theory of humors was
not scientific in the least, but a form of traditional medicine similar
to the Chinese in its application of science.  When medicine became
scientific, such things were done away (except for a few specific
conditions, for which both leeches and {*filter*}letting are of actual value).

--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Gordon Banks  N3JXP      | "I have given you an argument; I am not obliged

----------------------------------------------------------------------------



Sun, 17 Jul 1994 01:29:45 GMT
 Herbal Utility (resembles: herbalife ...)

Quote:
>What has that to do with science?  The use of leeches and {*filter*}letting
>is an old folk treatment.  Aristotle's medical theory of humors was
>not scientific in the least, but a form of traditional medicine similar
>to the Chinese in its application of science.  When medicine became
>scientific, such things were done away (except for a few specific
>conditions, for which both leeches and {*filter*}letting are of actual value).

Lost our sense of humour, have we? Tut, tut.

        -- Bryan

--
"Hell must be isothermal; for             | "Either you are part of the solution or
otherwise the resident engineers and   | you are part of the precipitate."
physical chemists (of which there must | "Consumer-grade religion does not
be some) could set up a heat engine to | encourage logical thinking." -- K.Jones
run a refrigerator to cool off a       +----------------------------------------
portion of their surroundings to any   | Bryan O'Sullivan (Tetragrammaton)   :-)

-- Henry Albert Bent, _The Second Law_ | This mind intentionally left blank.



Sun, 17 Jul 1994 02:54:20 GMT
 Herbal Utility (resembles: herbalife ...)

Quote:

>>I will concede that bacterial diseases are a traditionally weak area for
>>Chinese methods - that's why most acupuncturists don't make these primary
>>areas of emphasis.

>Well, that's one way of putting it.  Another way might be the observation
>that most of the diseases that alternative medicine specializes in are
>those for which there is no effective western treatment.  When there
>is such treatment, people won't bother with the far-out stuff.  I'm

So when will western medicine be coming up with these effective
treatments? Hurry, I'm turning blue holding my breath.


Wed, 20 Jul 1994 05:09:33 GMT
 Herbal Utility (resembles: herbalife ...)

Quote:

>No, bleeding the victim (excuse me, patient) is a MUCH more efficient
>way to remove "toxins" from the system. Leeches are a good way to
>accomplish this.

>Plus, {*filter*}letting will help bring  the humours back into balance.

>Isn't science wonderful?

Western science you mean?

Bleeding was never a major part of the Chinese repertoire from what I
can see.
--

(510) 656-1902                  "A R Colter" on America Online
"Heaviness is the root of lightness; calmness is the controller of haste"



Wed, 20 Jul 1994 12:02:51 GMT
 Herbal Utility (resembles: herbalife ...)

Quote:

>"Hell must be isothermal; for        
>otherwise the resident engineers and  
>physical chemists (of which there must
>be some) could set up a heat engine to
>run a refrigerator to cool off a      
>portion of their surroundings to any
>desired temperature."              
>-- Henry Albert Bent, _The Second Law_

That would certainly be consistent with the view of Hell as being
the ultimate high in entropy.
_
--

(510) 656-1902                  "A R Colter" on America Online
"Heaviness is the root of lightness; calmness is the controller of haste"


Wed, 20 Jul 1994 12:08:14 GMT
 Herbal Utility (resembles: herbalife ...)

Quote:
>sorts of claims about them.  Now that we have penicillin, nobody bothers
>with herbs for bacterial illness.  Now the herbalists treat things like
>tinnitus and inoperable cancer.

Sure, until something better is perfected. No one is saying there's not some
chance that will be done as well.

--

(510) 656-1902                  "A R Colter" on America Online
"Heaviness is the root of lightness; calmness is the controller of haste"



Wed, 20 Jul 1994 12:05:15 GMT
 Herbal Utility (resembles: herbalife ...)

Quote:


>>No, bleeding the victim (excuse me, patient) is a MUCH more efficient
>>way to remove "toxins" from the system. Leeches are a good way to
>>accomplish this.
>>Plus, {*filter*}letting will help bring  the humours back into balance.
>>Isn't science wonderful?
>Western science you mean?
>Bleeding was never a major part of the Chinese repertoire from what I
>can see.

Avery, your posting gives the impression (accurately or otherwise) that
once again you have missed the point.
    Bleeding was _not_ being suggested seriously as a treatment for
malaria; note Robert's use of the word "victim". To imply, as he did,
that "removing toxins by sweating" is even less efficacious than
bleeding the victim, is _not_ to suggest that bleeding was ever part of
the Chinese repertoire (nor that it ought to be).
    (Hmm. Maybe I should be even more explicit, for the sake of any
subtlety-impaired readers.) What I _did_ interpret his posting to
suggest was that the treatment you proposed is somewhere between
worthless and dangerous.

Letting malaria-carrying mosquitoes bite somebody and then (putatively)
removing the toxins again by sweating has little to commend it as an
alternative to keeping the mosquitoes away in the first place.
    As a separate point, what evidence have you that the treatment you
propose would have any effect whatsoever on the malaria parasite?

--



Fri, 22 Jul 1994 02:58:09 GMT
 
 [ 9 post ] 

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