Duck season, rabbit season... 
Author Message
 Duck season, rabbit season...


Quote:

>What statistics? I have yet to see any statistics from the anti-smokers here
>other than undocumented, possibly fictional ones.

Let's enlist the help of the fine folks on sci.med.


Wed, 04 Sep 1996 10:29:30 GMT
 Duck season, rabbit season...

Quote:

>Would you care to name some of these 30+ year old studies on the effects of
>second-hand smoke? Authors perhaps?

Fred, yeah, that's it Fred is one of the names of the 30+ year old studies.

Just because we can quote chapter and verse doesn't mean they don't
exist.

Time to appeal to our friends over at sci.med.
A
A
A



Wed, 04 Sep 1996 11:25:09 GMT
 Duck season, rabbit season...


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Duck season, rabbit season...

Quote:

> > What statistics? I have yet to see any statistics from the anti-smokers
> > here other than undocumented, possibly fictional ones.

> Let's enlist the help of the fine folks on sci.med

A quick medline search reveals a couple of recent studies and a review.
 I don't vouch for their contents as I haven't read any of them.
Perhaps the EPA report referenced in Lesmes's review would be helpful.

 Author(s): Greer JR, Abbey DE, Burchette RJ
     Title: Asthma related to occupational and ambient air pollutants
in
             nonsmokers.
    Source: Journal of occupational medicine 1993 Sep;35(9):909-15.
  Abstract: We attempted to determine the association between
occupational
             and air pollutant exposure with the development of {*filter*}
asthma
             through the analysis of a standardized respiratory
             questionnaire administered to a cohort of 3914 nonsmoking
             {*filter*}s in 1977 and again in 1987. Ambient air pollution
             concentrations were estimated over a 20-year period using
             monthly interpolations from fixed-site monitoring stations
             applied to zip code locations by month of residence and
work
             site. *Second-hand smoke* exposure was significantly
associated
             with the development of asthma (related risk [RR] = 1.45,
             confidence interval [CI] = 1.21 to 1.75). Airways
obstructive
             disease before age 16 was related to a marked increased
risk
             (RR = 4.24, CI = 4.03 to 4.45). An increased risk of
asthma
             was significantly associated with increased ambient
             concentrations of ozone exposure in men (RR = 3.12, CI =
1.61
             to 5.85).

 Author(s): Lesmes GR, Donofrio KH
     Title: Passive smoking: the medical and economic issues.
    Source: The American journal of medicine 1992 Jul
15;93(1A):38S-42S.
  Abstract: Since the late 1970s, the dangers associated with passive
             (involuntary) smoking have been widely debated. While
research
             throughout the world has produced findings showing
sidestream
             *smoke* to be harmful and possibly deadly to nonsmokers,
an
             equal number of studies have indicated that the harms have
been
             overstated or misclassified or that they are nonexistent.
Those
             debates have culminated in a report sponsored by the
             Environmental Protection Agency and other federal
agencies. The
             report concludes that *second-hand* cigarette *smoke*
kills
             53,000 nonsmokers a year and is a major cause of indoor
air
             pollution. This article identifies the major medical and
             economic issues in the debate on side-stream *smoke*. It
             affirms the federal government's position on the need to
create
             more *smoke*-free environments and impose stronger smoking
             restrictions nationwide.

 Author(s): White JR, Froeb HF, Kulik JA
     Title: Respiratory illness in nonsmokers chronically exposed to
tobacco
             *smoke* in the work place.
    Source: Chest 1991 Jul;100(1):39-43.
  Abstract: We evaluated CO levels as an index of cigarette *smoke* in
the
             work place and analyzed diary entries on respiratory
symptoms,
             eye irritation, chest colds and lost days from work due to
             respiratory illness in 40 passive smokers (nonsmokers
             chronically exposed to tobacco *smoke* in the work place)
and
             40 control subjects (nonsmokers not exposed to tobacco
*smoke*
             in  the work place) matched for age and gender. Passive
smokers
             experienced greater CO levels during the workday. Also
they
             reported significantly more cough, greater phlegm
production,
             more shortness of breath, greater eye irritation, more
chest
             colds and more days lost from work due to chest  colds
than
             control subjects. Nonsmoking workers and their employers
are
             likely to incur significant financial loss because of
missed
             workdays due to illnesses resulting from exposure to
             *second-hand* tobacco *smoke*.

------------------
Greg Froehlich, MD
White River Junction, VT



Sat, 07 Sep 1996 07:11:24 GMT
 
 [ 4 post ] 

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