Depression and Manic Depression 
Author Message
 Depression and Manic Depression


Quote:

> I came across a green and white pamphlet with the word
> depression in yellow letters.  The following is an excerpt, reproduced
> without permission, from that pamphlet.

We have a poster with much the same thing on some of the exam room doors.
It really helps to open people up to the idea that they might be depressed.

Quote:
> When I read, "When four or more of these symptoms persist for more than two
> weeks, they may be outward indications of a clinical depression.", I began
> to wonder.  I have had 13 of the 14 symptoms for much longer than two weeks,
> and the 14th is a possibility, depending on how you define it.  

It's often hard for people to bring themselves to see a psychiatrist because
of the attached stigma, particularly unjustified if you are manic/depressive
IMHO because this is about as organic a disorder as they get.  Just think
about how great it will feel not to have those symptoms and what it will do
for the people you love and call.  This is generally easily treatable.

David Nye



Sun, 14 May 1995 14:31:15 GMT
 Depression and Manic Depression

Quote:

>It's often hard for people to bring themselves to see a psychiatrist because
>of the attached stigma, particularly unjustified if you are manic/depressive
>IMHO because this is about as organic a disorder as they get.  Just think

The popular image of psychiatrists is still that they are Freudian
psychoanalysts, not treaters of brain diseases.

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Mon, 15 May 1995 02:22:39 GMT
 Depression and Manic Depression

Quote:

> It's often hard for people to bring themselves to see a psychiatrist because
> of the attached stigma, particularly unjustified if you are manic/depressive
> IMHO because this is about as organic a disorder as they get.  Just think
> about how great it will feel not to have those symptoms and what it will do
> for the people you love and call.  This is generally easily treatable.

Oh, how?

As for the `stigma' being unjustified, that depends.  An airline pilot
might well face loss of license after seeing a psychiatrist, depending
on what the psychiatrist decides to tell the FAA.  And yes, pilots have
to authorize the FAA to examine all their medical records.
--
                                --Andrew Koenig



Mon, 15 May 1995 02:18:33 GMT
 Depression and Manic Depression

Quote:

>IMHO because this is about as organic a disorder as they get.  Just think
>about how great it will feel not to have those symptoms and what it will do
>for the people you love and call.  This is generally easily treatable.

Part of the problem is that hypomania may feel *great* to the subject.
Now how it feels to everyone *else* around them is another matter...
You're much more likely to see a patient in for *depression* instead
of mania, except where the patient's loved ones have dragged them in
saying "We can't DEAL with this anymore!".

--

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Mon, 15 May 1995 10:11:49 GMT
 Depression and Manic Depression

Quote:
>>It's often hard for people to bring themselves to see a psychiatrist because
>>of the attached stigma, particularly unjustified if you are manic/depressive
>>IMHO because this is about as organic a disorder as they get.  Just think
>>about how great it will feel not to have those symptoms and what it will do
>>for the people you love and call.  This is generally easily treatable.
>Oh, how?

Medication, usually lithium carbonate.

Quote:
>As for the `stigma' being unjustified, that depends.  An airline pilot
>might well face loss of license after seeing a psychiatrist, depending
>on what the psychiatrist decides to tell the FAA.  And yes, pilots have
>to authorize the FAA to examine all their medical records.

"Stigma" means in this context "a mark of social disgrace", not an
undesired consequence of some action.  Some prospective psychiatric
patients believe that others will see them as weak or as failures at
life if they need to see a psychiatrist.  In fact, the onset of symptoms
from this condition is not preventable by an act of will, and is
therefore not the patient's fault any more than is any other inherited
disorder.

If the FAA and your doctor determine that you are a poor risk to fly
because of some medical or psychiatric condition, perhaps they are doing
you and your passengers a favor by grounding you.  Whether you accept
this or not, it is incorrect to say that they are stigmatizing you.

David Nye



Tue, 16 May 1995 11:30:14 GMT
 Depression and Manic Depression
Keywords:


]
]> It's often hard for people to bring themselves to see a psychiatrist because
]> of the attached stigma, particularly unjustified if you are manic/depressive
]> IMHO because this is about as organic a disorder as they get.  Just think
]> about how great it will feel not to have those symptoms and what it will do
]> for the people you love and call.  This is generally easily treatable.
]
]Oh, how?
]
]As for the `stigma' being unjustified, that depends.  An airline pilot
]might well face loss of license after seeing a psychiatrist, depending
]on what the psychiatrist decides to tell the FAA.  And yes, pilots have
]to authorize the FAA to examine all their medical records.

He would not lose his license, but he might lose his medical certificate. On
the other hand, he might lose it for visiting a cardiologist also. It depends
on what the disorder is.

On the other hand, it is true that the FAA is a bit silly about some of this.
A friend of mine had his original medical delayed a year because he admitted
that, as a child, he had visited a psychiatrist. The fact that his father
was a psychiatrist, and thus more likely to send his son to one, didn't
seem to affect the FAA.

--
John Moore NJ7E, 7525 Clearwater Pkwy, Scottsdale, AZ 85253  (602-951-9326)

 - - A conservative is a liberal who has been mugged by reality! - -
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Tue, 16 May 1995 00:09:06 GMT
 Depression and Manic Depression

Quote:

> If the FAA and your doctor determine that you are a poor risk to fly
> because of some medical or psychiatric condition, perhaps they are doing
> you and your passengers a favor by grounding you.

You miss the point.  Pilots are required to report all contacts with
medical professionals to the FAA and the FAA assumes the worst.
Therefore, mere contact with a psychiatrist is likely to result
in an avalanche of paperwork, even in the absence of any positive
diagnosis.
--
                                --Andrew Koenig



Wed, 17 May 1995 01:59:53 GMT
 Depression and Manic Depression

Quote:

> He would not lose his license, but he might lose his medical certificate. On
> the other hand, he might lose it for visiting a cardiologist also. It depends
> on what the disorder is.

Point taken.  The troubling thing is that he might lose his medical
certificate even after a negative diagnosis.

For example, I read a few years ago about someone who started having dizzy
spells.  He thought hard about what might have happened about the time they
started and realized that about then he had started consuming soft drinks
that were sweetened with aspartame.  He stopped doing so and the dizzy spells
immediately stopped.

Nevertheless, the FAA pulled his medical certificate for `disturbance
of consciousness without known cause' and refused to give it back even
after the cause was known.  Their rationale: aspartame is approved by
the FDA and is therefore not capable of causing dizzy spells; the cause
must therefore be something yet unknown.

Now, back to the point of my original posting.  The FAA is one example
of a particular kind of behavior that is actually exhibited by many
other people and organizations in positions of authority.  If those
people control certain aspects of one's life, one may wish to avoid
doing things that would otherwise be completely sensible.  Such
strategies are not irrational; merely pragmatic reactions to today's world.
--
                                --Andrew Koenig



Wed, 17 May 1995 02:05:49 GMT
 
 [ 8 post ] 

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