Motion sickness: Ginger? 
Author Message
 Motion sickness: Ginger?

I experience some motion sickness while flying.  Generally, I take
Bonine.  I have heard of using ginger.  What would be the best
form to take?  Powdered, capsules, raw root, or something else?

Thanks in advance!

John Scott



Mon, 10 Feb 1997 22:49:31 GMT
 Motion sickness: Ginger?
: I experience some motion sickness while flying.  Generally, I take
: Bonine.  I have heard of using ginger.  What would be the best
: form to take?  Powdered, capsules, raw root, or something else?

: Thanks in advance!

This is what my favorite herbal book, _The Honest Herbal_ has to
say about ginger:

"About a decade ago, a double-blind study conducted on 36 college
students with a susceptability to motion sicknesss concluded that
940 mg of powdered ginger was superior to 100 mg of diumanhydrinate
in reducing symptoms when consumed 25 minutes prior to tests in
a tilted, rotating chair.  Five additional studies have been made
since that time by other investigators; two yielded negative results,
but three confirmed the initial findings.  German health authorities
have subsequently concluded that ginger, at an average daily dose
level of 2 to 4 g is effective for preventing motion sickness, and
is also useful as a digestive aid.  Any anti-emetic effects of
ginger are due to its local action in the stomach, not to any
central nervous system activity.

Ginger is ordinarily taken in the form of capsules, each containing
500 mg of the powdered herb.  It may also be consumed as a tea
or in the form of candied ginger that is readily availalble in
Oriental cooking.net">food markets.  There are no reports of severe toxicity
in humans from eating ginger, but some of the recent pharmacologic
studies of its constituients would seem to indicate that very large
overdoses might carry the potential for causing depression of the
central nervous system and cardiac arrthymias."

And my usual recommendation to anyone interested in herbal medicine:
GO BUY THIS BOOK!  It is the one herbal I have found that relies
solely upon scientifically validated evidence and that gives
references.  The author is eminently qualified in his field and
is an instructor in the School of Pharmacy at Purdue University.
It costs less than $20, is in print and can be ordered through
any bookshop in the US.  _The Honest Herbal_ by Varro Tyler.
The Haworth Press.  ISBN #1-56024-287-6

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

     Shrine of the {*filter*}netic Madonna BBS      213-766-1356
              "The BBS for the information {*filter*}!"
-----------------------------------------------------------------------



Wed, 12 Feb 1997 11:15:14 GMT
 Motion sickness: Ginger?

Quote:


> : I experience some motion sickness while flying.  Generally, I take
> : Bonine.  I have heard of using ginger.  What would be the best
> : form to take?  Powdered, capsules, raw root, or something else?

> : Thanks in advance!

> This is what my favorite herbal book, _The Honest Herbal_ has to
> say about ginger:

> "About a decade ago, a double-blind study conducted on 36 college
> students with a susceptability to motion sicknesss concluded that
> 940 mg of powdered ginger was superior to 100 mg of diumanhydrinate
> in reducing symptoms when consumed 25 minutes prior to tests in
> a tilted, rotating chair.  Five additional studies have been made
> since that time by other investigators; two yielded negative results,
> but three confirmed the initial findings.  German health authorities
> have subsequently concluded that ginger, at an average daily dose
> level of 2 to 4 g is effective for preventing motion sickness, and
> is also useful as a digestive aid.  Any anti-emetic effects of
> ginger are due to its local action in the stomach, not to any
> central nervous system activity.

Not exactly :-)  I was the one who published the work that indicated that
there *may* be a central effect.

Quote:
> Ginger is ordinarily taken in the form of capsules, each containing
> 500 mg of the powdered herb.  It may also be consumed as a tea
> or in the form of candied ginger that is readily availalble in
> Oriental cooking.net">food markets.  There are no reports of severe toxicity
> in humans from eating ginger, but some of the recent pharmacologic

True. We ran the SOS Chromotest on ginger and found neither genotoxicity
nor embryotoxicity. HOWEVER .....  about 3 years ago I published a short
note in a gynecology journal and suggested that pregnant women should NOT take
ginger since it may act similarly as Cimetidine and affect sex-steroid
differentiation of the brain. (A prior paper in this journal had recommended
ginger for morning sickness).

Also: go easy on ginger. Your PTT will be very prolonged. If you cut yourself
your bleeding time will be quite long. About 3 years ago, some moron
wrote a paper in ANAESTHESIA (a British anesthesiology journal) recommending
that ginger be used pre-operatively to prevent post-operative nausea and
vomiting. Yours truly went a little ballistic :-)  I'm sure the ginger
woud prevent the nausea and vomiting but it would probably also cause the
patient to bleed to death. Some acrimonious debate went on the journal and
was only resolved in a recent paper this year in THROMBOSIS AND HAEMOSTASIS.

Ginger is a drug. Our parasitology unit is investigating its use in
treating worm infestation when NOTHING else seems to be effective.

Quote:
> studies of its constituients would seem to indicate that very large
> overdoses might carry the potential for causing depression of the
> central nervous system and cardiac arrthymias."

Huh ? It's a thromboxane synthetase inhibitor and would thus prevent
tachyarrhythmias ! We (cardiology outpatient unit) routinely recommend
to our patients that they ingest a teaspoon/day of ground ginger. It also
seems to prevent restenosis injury. The stuff also calms down patients
before PTCA's.

Josh

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> And my usual recommendation to anyone interested in herbal medicine:
> GO BUY THIS BOOK!  It is the one herbal I have found that relies
> solely upon scientifically validated evidence and that gives
> references.  The author is eminently qualified in his field and
> is an instructor in the School of Pharmacy at Purdue University.
> It costs less than $20, is in print and can be ordered through
> any bookshop in the US.  _The Honest Herbal_ by Varro Tyler.
> The Haworth Press.  ISBN #1-56024-287-6

> -----------------------------------------------------------------------

>      Shrine of the {*filter*}netic Madonna BBS      213-766-1356
>               "The BBS for the information {*filter*}!"
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------



Sun, 16 Feb 1997 02:20:46 GMT
 
 [ 3 post ] 

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