Research in neural hearing loss? 
Author Message
 Research in neural hearing loss?

     I have been unimpressed at the clinical level of our understanding of
the causes of nerve related hearing loss, a condition from which I suffer.
I have been to the Leyhe Clinic, Boston Mass General, Stanford University,
and they all say "you have a nerve related hearing loss" and the conversation
stops there.  I ask, why?  No response.
     Since I am a Ph.D. researcher I am naturally curious about the causes of
such a condition.  I have not been subjected to any exceptionally loud noises
so that is out.  The condition began at the age of 30 and has progressively
worsened over the last 16 years.  One could simply say "well, what do you
expect, your getting older!"  But this doesn't hold water since there are
many people in their 90's that don't have hearing loss.
     I could go into the symptoms but I wont.  What I wish to know is
whether there is anyone doing research on possible causes of such
conditions?  Specifically, is anyone considering whether the immune system
is attacking the cilia in the inner ear (I do have allergies)?  Is anyone
considering the molecular biology of nerve transmission in the inner ear
and whether a hormone imballance could be involved (I have a mild case
of hypoglycemia)?  
     My auditory brain stem responses are normal so that the path way to
the auditory cortex is fine. This would lead me to believe that the problem,
is indeed localized to the mechanism of nerve activation.  The fact that
tinitus is present says that the nerves are being over-stimulated not
under-stimulated. Which says that something is wrong with the
neuro-transmitter functioning (it seems highly unlikely that the cillia of
the ear are actually moving back and forth even though sound have been
recorded from the ear for people with acute tinitus).  What is the
actual coupling process between the hair cells and the nerves and what
chemicals affect this coupling?
     Carver Mead of Synaptics has produced a silicon model of the inner ear
that uses something like 128 "taps" to represent the frequency response
structure of the cochlea. Although this gets us a little closer to
understanding the function of the ear it does not aid in understanding the
molecular functioning of it.
     Who is doing research along the lines mentioned above?

--

Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS)
M/S 230-5, NASA Ames Research Center
Moffett Field, CA 94035



Mon, 12 Apr 1993 02:30:32 GMT
 Research in neural hearing loss?
I have tinitus too. I haven't looked into it yet, but I'd like to learn more
about it too.

I guess the first place I'd look is in the DIALOG databases. The Stanford
medical library has access to them, as do some on-line services that
consumers can buy time from (Delphi for example). I'd scan all the databases
with keywords like "tinitus" and "nerve". An ear doctor could probably
recommend better keywords to search on. The keywords should be general enough
to not exclude good references, yet only retrieving references that interest
you. One of the "on tap" databases has indexes for all the other databases,
and will guide you toward the daatabase to focus your effort on. Then you can
specify that database and pull up references to articles that interest you.
The correct database(s) could be MEDLINE or a pharmacutical database for
example. The Lane Medical Library should have the complete references in
their stacks.



Wed, 14 Apr 1993 07:25:16 GMT
 Research in neural hearing loss?

Quote:

>I have tinitus too. I haven't looked into it yet, but I'd like to learn more
>about it too.

I believe that chelation has been shown effective against tinitis in 413
different uncontrolled studies performed by extremely qualified researchers
whose results were published in unrefereed journals (but ones that I happen
to repect). I know that this has no scientific validity per se, but 413
studies (even if some of them don't mention "tinitis") sure makes you think
about it, doesn't it? Hell, just reading about it makes my ears start
ringing. [By the way, I understand that leeches work well too.] :-)

-John Hughes



Fri, 16 Apr 1993 09:06:33 GMT
 Research in neural hearing loss?

Quote:


>>I believe that chelation has been shown effective against tinitis in 413
>>different uncontrolled studies performed by extremely qualified researchers...

>Do you realise that tinnitus can be caused by a range of external, middle
>and inner ear abnormalities?  So determining what causes the tinnitus is
>pretty important.  Blanket statements about chelation, leeches or fruit
>bats isn't actually of much use.

OK, OK. I guess some folks didn't get the joke. I noticed that it was Kingsley
Morse who first asked about tinitis, and we have heard from him, over the last
6 months, a great deal about how chelation is the great cure for something
or other. I believe it was atherosclerosis. It is of no consequence. The point
is that he repeated himself endlessly about this topic, and I couldn't resist
the opportunity to parody and ridicule him. I know it's rude, and I should
apologize. It was probably just a bad day. To be honest, I'm actually
*interested* in knowing something about tinitis. I hope I haven't quashed all
hope of a real discussion. Sigh.

-John Hughes

Filler.



Sat, 17 Apr 1993 09:18:35 GMT
 Research in neural hearing loss?

Quote:

>I believe that chelation has been shown effective against tinitis in 413
>different uncontrolled studies performed by extremely qualified researchers...

Do you realise that tinnitus can be caused by a range of external, middle
and inner ear abnormalities?  So determining what causes the tinnitus is
pretty important.  Blanket statements about chelation, leeches or fruit
bats isn't actually of much use.

Say I have otitus externa* and that's giving me tinnitus.  How is chelation
going to help me?  Treating the otitus externa is the solution.


``When the going gets wierd, the weird turn pro...''

* an external ear (ear canal) problem affecting the skin



Sat, 17 Apr 1993 07:47:22 GMT
 
 [ 5 post ] 

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