The State of "Science" in 2002 
Author Message
 The State of "Science" in 2002

BERKELEY, Calif.  -- The "stunning discovery" of two new  
heavy elements in 1999 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was
based on fabricated research, lab officials now say.
        At a speech to employees last month, the lab's director,  
Charles Shank, said the previously hailed landmark discovery of
elements 118 and 116 was the result of scientific misconduct by one
individual of a 15-member team.
        Lab officials last year retracted the announcement of the  
discovery after the same research team and other scientists were
unable to duplicate the results, but the allegation of scientific
misconduct is only now becoming public.
        Shank's comments are detailed in the lab's official  
newsletter.
        The individual singled out by Shank, but not identified by  
him, was identified by several newspapers as fired physicist Victor
Ninov.
        Ninov was suspended by the lab in November, later fired and  
has a grievance pending regarding his dismissal. There was no phone
number listed in California for Ninov, and calls to the lab's
spokesman seeking further comment were not immediately returned.
        The announcement that scientists had discovered the two  
elements appeared in the June 1999 edition of the journal Physical
Review of Letters. A proposed retraction was submitted to the
journal last year.
        Prior to the scrutiny of the discovery, the Lawrence  
Berkeley lab team said its work confirmed theories that began to
circulate among physicists some 30 years ago about an "island of
stability" for nuclei with approximately 114 protons and 184
neutrons.
        In the original experiment, lead targets were bombarded with  
beams of high-energy krypton ions. The sequence of decay events for
elements 118 and 116, if detected, would be consistent with theories
of an "island of stability" for nuclei.
        Shank lauded his own department for ferreting out the fraud.  
        "There is nothing more important for a laboratory than  
scientific integrity," Shank told lab employees. "Only with such
integrity will the public, which funds our work, have confidence in
us."
        The heavy element research fraud is a stinging embarrassment  
for the lab. Shank admitted that basic verifications, necessary for
such lofty scientific proclamations, were not followed.
        "In this case, the most elementary checks and data archiving  
were not done," Shanks said.


Thu, 30 Dec 2004 22:28:52 GMT
 The State of "Science" in 2002
On Sun, 14 Jul 2002 10:28:52 -0400, B. D. Essem

Quote:

>BERKELEY, Calif.  -- The "stunning discovery" of two new  
>heavy elements in 1999 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was
>based on fabricated research, lab officials now say.
>    At a speech to employees last month, the lab's director,  
>Charles Shank, said the previously hailed landmark discovery of
>elements 118 and 116 was the result of scientific misconduct by one
>individual of a 15-member team.
>    Lab officials last year retracted the announcement of the  
>discovery after the same research team and other scientists were
>unable to duplicate the results, but the allegation of scientific
>misconduct is only now becoming public.
>    Shank's comments are detailed in the lab's official  
>newsletter.
>    The individual singled out by Shank, but not identified by  
>him, was identified by several newspapers as fired physicist Victor
>Ninov.
>    Ninov was suspended by the lab in November, later fired and  
>has a grievance pending regarding his dismissal. There was no phone
>number listed in California for Ninov, and calls to the lab's
>spokesman seeking further comment were not immediately returned.
>    The announcement that scientists had discovered the two  
>elements appeared in the June 1999 edition of the journal Physical
>Review of Letters. A proposed retraction was submitted to the
>journal last year.
>    Prior to the scrutiny of the discovery, the Lawrence  
>Berkeley lab team said its work confirmed theories that began to
>circulate among physicists some 30 years ago about an "island of
>stability" for nuclei with approximately 114 protons and 184
>neutrons.
>    In the original experiment, lead targets were bombarded with  
>beams of high-energy krypton ions. The sequence of decay events for
>elements 118 and 116, if detected, would be consistent with theories
>of an "island of stability" for nuclei.
>    Shank lauded his own department for ferreting out the fraud.  
>    "There is nothing more important for a laboratory than  
>scientific integrity," Shank told lab employees. "Only with such
>integrity will the public, which funds our work, have confidence in
>us."
>    The heavy element research fraud is a stinging embarrassment  
>for the lab. Shank admitted that basic verifications, necessary for
>such lofty scientific proclamations, were not followed.
>    "In this case, the most elementary checks and data archiving  
>were not done," Shanks said.

Thus your point?

Are you stating that Brad Jesness "element 116" and Cornholio "element
118" simply do not exist?

True, both are "stinging embarrassments". Basic verifications were
never done.



Thu, 30 Dec 2004 22:52:26 GMT
 The State of "Science" in 2002

Quote:

>On Sun, 14 Jul 2002 10:28:52 -0400, B. D. Essem

>>BERKELEY, Calif.  -- The "stunning discovery" of two new  
>>heavy elements in 1999 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was
>>based on fabricated research, lab officials now say.
>>        At a speech to employees last month, the lab's director,  
>>Charles Shank, said the previously hailed landmark discovery of
>>elements 118 and 116 was the result of scientific misconduct by one
>>individual of a 15-member team.
>>        Lab officials last year retracted the announcement of the  
>>discovery after the same research team and other scientists were
>>unable to duplicate the results, but the allegation of scientific
>>misconduct is only now becoming public.
>>        Shank's comments are detailed in the lab's official  
>>newsletter.
>>        The individual singled out by Shank, but not identified by  
>>him, was identified by several newspapers as fired physicist Victor
>>Ninov.
>>        Ninov was suspended by the lab in November, later fired and  
>>has a grievance pending regarding his dismissal. There was no phone
>>number listed in California for Ninov, and calls to the lab's
>>spokesman seeking further comment were not immediately returned.
>>        The announcement that scientists had discovered the two  
>>elements appeared in the June 1999 edition of the journal Physical
>>Review of Letters. A proposed retraction was submitted to the
>>journal last year.
>>        Prior to the scrutiny of the discovery, the Lawrence  
>>Berkeley lab team said its work confirmed theories that began to
>>circulate among physicists some 30 years ago about an "island of
>>stability" for nuclei with approximately 114 protons and 184
>>neutrons.
>>        In the original experiment, lead targets were bombarded with  
>>beams of high-energy krypton ions. The sequence of decay events for
>>elements 118 and 116, if detected, would be consistent with theories
>>of an "island of stability" for nuclei.
>>        Shank lauded his own department for ferreting out the fraud.  
>>        "There is nothing more important for a laboratory than  
>>scientific integrity," Shank told lab employees. "Only with such
>>integrity will the public, which funds our work, have confidence in
>>us."
>>        The heavy element research fraud is a stinging embarrassment  
>>for the lab. Shank admitted that basic verifications, necessary for
>>such lofty scientific proclamations, were not followed.
>>        "In this case, the most elementary checks and data archiving  
>>were not done," Shanks said.

>Thus your point?

>Are you stating that Brad Jesness "element 116" and Cornholio "element
>118" simply do not exist?

>True, both are "stinging embarrassments". Basic verifications were
>never done.

Brad and Cornholio are like hydrogen and oxygen, you couldn't live
without them!


Fri, 31 Dec 2004 17:56:38 GMT
 The State of "Science" in 2002

Quote:


>>On Sun, 14 Jul 2002 10:28:52 -0400, B. D. Essem

>>>BERKELEY, Calif.  -- The "stunning discovery" of two new  
>>>heavy elements in 1999 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was
>>>based on fabricated research, lab officials now say.
>>>    At a speech to employees last month, the lab's director,  
>>>Charles Shank, said the previously hailed landmark discovery of
>>>elements 118 and 116 was the result of scientific misconduct by one
>>>individual of a 15-member team.
>>>    Lab officials last year retracted the announcement of the  
>>>discovery after the same research team and other scientists were
>>>unable to duplicate the results, but the allegation of scientific
>>>misconduct is only now becoming public.
>>>    Shank's comments are detailed in the lab's official  
>>>newsletter.
>>>    The individual singled out by Shank, but not identified by  
>>>him, was identified by several newspapers as fired physicist Victor
>>>Ninov.
>>>    Ninov was suspended by the lab in November, later fired and  
>>>has a grievance pending regarding his dismissal. There was no phone
>>>number listed in California for Ninov, and calls to the lab's
>>>spokesman seeking further comment were not immediately returned.
>>>    The announcement that scientists had discovered the two  
>>>elements appeared in the June 1999 edition of the journal Physical
>>>Review of Letters. A proposed retraction was submitted to the
>>>journal last year.
>>>    Prior to the scrutiny of the discovery, the Lawrence  
>>>Berkeley lab team said its work confirmed theories that began to
>>>circulate among physicists some 30 years ago about an "island of
>>>stability" for nuclei with approximately 114 protons and 184
>>>neutrons.
>>>    In the original experiment, lead targets were bombarded with  
>>>beams of high-energy krypton ions. The sequence of decay events for
>>>elements 118 and 116, if detected, would be consistent with theories
>>>of an "island of stability" for nuclei.
>>>    Shank lauded his own department for ferreting out the fraud.  
>>>    "There is nothing more important for a laboratory than  
>>>scientific integrity," Shank told lab employees. "Only with such
>>>integrity will the public, which funds our work, have confidence in
>>>us."
>>>    The heavy element research fraud is a stinging embarrassment  
>>>for the lab. Shank admitted that basic verifications, necessary for
>>>such lofty scientific proclamations, were not followed.
>>>    "In this case, the most elementary checks and data archiving  
>>>were not done," Shanks said.

>>Thus your point?

>>Are you stating that Brad Jesness "element 116" and Cornholio "element
>>118" simply do not exist?

>>True, both are "stinging embarrassments". Basic verifications were
>>never done.

>Brad and Cornholio are like hydrogen and oxygen, you couldn't live
>without them!

WTF are you saying? That they are both gas?

We would all live better without those two and all similar species.



Sat, 01 Jan 2005 07:14:22 GMT
 The State of "Science" in 2002

Quote:

>>Brad and Cornholio are like hydrogen and oxygen, you couldn't live
>>without them!

>WTF are you saying? That they are both gas?

>We would all live better without those two and all similar species.

Huh?????????????????????????
Translation: You wouldn't have no one to{*filter*}at.


Sat, 01 Jan 2005 09:29:12 GMT
 The State of "Science" in 2002


Quote:

>>>Brad and Cornholio are like hydrogen and oxygen, you couldn't live
>>>without them!

>>WTF are you saying? That they are both gas?

>>We would all live better without those two and all similar species.

>Huh?????????????????????????
>Translation: You wouldn't have no one to{*filter*}at.

You mean in SPP. And that is the point, to clean up the garbage, and
only that. If those two were gone no ones heart would break, and this
would be a far more peaceful place. Which you could have noticed while
they were gone.

There is plenty of species to "piss at" so if that was the point and
two were down, you still couldn't live long enough to rid the world of
such village idiots.



Sat, 01 Jan 2005 09:39:32 GMT
 The State of "Science" in 2002


Quote:
>-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
>Hash: SHA1






>> >>On Sun, 14 Jul 2002 10:28:52 -0400, B. D. Essem

>> >>>BERKELEY, Calif.  -- The "stunning discovery" of two new heavy
>> >>>elements in 1999 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was
>> >>>based on fabricated research, lab officials now say.  

>[snip]

>> >>>   The heavy element research fraud is a stinging embarrassment
>> >>>for the lab. Shank admitted that basic verifications, necessary
>> >>>for such lofty scientific proclamations, were not followed.  
>> >>>"In this case, the most elementary checks and data archiving
>> >>>were not done," Shanks said.  

>> >>Thus your point?

>> >>Are you stating that Brad Jesness "element 116" and Cornholio
>> >>"element 118" simply do not exist?  

>> >>True, both are "stinging embarrassments". Basic verifications
>> >>were never done.

>> >Brad and Cornholio are like hydrogen and oxygen, you couldn't live
>> >without them!

>> WTF are you saying? That they are both gas?

>Maybe they just have gas?

>> We would all live better without those two and all similar species.

>It is said that with enough pig farts, one could power a small city.
>Perhaps they should consider a new occupation?

ROTFL

Damn, you just posted the 1st useful thing that those two could do,
and do very well.

"Jesness & Cornholio The ECO Power Plant Co."

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
>^reaper^

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>iQA/AwUBPTOrzvP5CFQ+diGBEQLIawCgkqY307a3uChzShU63UDpnVzAxlgAnA4y
>zXsLmtCm30hKeqlWXxj1D2NW
>=8Mpe
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Sat, 01 Jan 2005 14:35:31 GMT
 The State of "Science" in 2002

Quote:

> BERKELEY, Calif.  -- The "stunning discovery" of two new
> heavy elements in 1999 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was
> based on fabricated research, lab officials now say.
>         At a speech to employees last month, the lab's director,
> Charles Shank, said the previously hailed landmark discovery of
> elements 118 and 116 was the result of scientific misconduct by one
> individual of a 15-member team.
>         Lab officials last year retracted the announcement of the
> discovery after the same research team and other scientists were
> unable to duplicate the results, but the allegation of scientific
> misconduct is only now becoming public.
>         Shank's comments are detailed in the lab's official
> newsletter.
>         The individual singled out by Shank, but not identified by
> him, was identified by several newspapers as fired physicist Victor
> Ninov.
>         Ninov was suspended by the lab in November, later fired and
> has a grievance pending regarding his dismissal. There was no phone
> number listed in California for Ninov, and calls to the lab's
> spokesman seeking further comment were not immediately returned.
>         The announcement that scientists had discovered the two
> elements appeared in the June 1999 edition of the journal Physical
> Review of Letters. A proposed retraction was submitted to the
> journal last year.
>         Prior to the scrutiny of the discovery, the Lawrence
> Berkeley lab team said its work confirmed theories that began to
> circulate among physicists some 30 years ago about an "island of
> stability" for nuclei with approximately 114 protons and 184
> neutrons.
>         In the original experiment, lead targets were bombarded with
> beams of high-energy krypton ions. The sequence of decay events for
> elements 118 and 116, if detected, would be consistent with theories
> of an "island of stability" for nuclei.
>         Shank lauded his own department for ferreting out the fraud.
>         "There is nothing more important for a laboratory than
> scientific integrity," Shank told lab employees. "Only with such
> integrity will the public, which funds our work, have confidence in
> us."
>         The heavy element research fraud is a stinging embarrassment
> for the lab. Shank admitted that basic verifications, necessary for
> such lofty scientific proclamations, were not followed.
>         "In this case, the most elementary checks and data archiving
> were not done," Shanks said.

Can you be more specific with regards to Atomic Numbers 116 and
118, and in particular, the relative stability in the Periodic Table
with
reference to same?

...Joe
--
DDZQKHAMEALMLGADLVJY



Sun, 02 Jan 2005 06:28:25 GMT
 
 [ 8 post ] 

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