Coffee and diareaha 
Author Message
 Coffee and diareaha


Quote:
>  Coffee can act as a laxative and/or cause diarreaha.
>  What action of caffine and other stimulants causes this?

I don't think it's necessarily the caffeine; more likely it's
the essential oils in the coffee which have an irritant effect.


Sat, 08 May 1993 02:48:22 GMT
 Coffee and diareaha

->
->  Coffee can act as a laxative and/or cause diarreaha.
->This is true with some other stimulants also, I don't
->know if this is true for all of them.
->  What action of caffine and other stimulants causes this?
->is it the drug itself, or is it caused indirectly by incresed
->stress?  Does a chronic coffee drinker develop much of a
->tolerance to this effect?

I've never heard of coffee acting as a laxative or causing diarrhea.  I
probably qualify as a chronic coffee drinker.  I have not found that long
term consumption of 20-25 cups of standard regulation (not decaffeinated)
coffee per day has had any effects such as diarrhea, stomach upset, sleep
disturbances, nervousness or any of the other standard complaints that
people imagine to be caused by coffee.  The only noticeable effect
different from drinking equivalent amounts of water is that it seems to
want to pass through the kidneys and out of the body faster.

Perhaps the diarrhea effect was achieved by feeding rats large amounts of
coffee grounds (roughage), rather than the infusion usually consumed by
humans?



Sat, 08 May 1993 19:59:56 GMT
 Coffee and diareaha

Quote:
>JD
>>>  Coffee can act as a laxative and/or cause diarreaha.
>>>  What action of caffine and other stimulants causes this?

>Steve Dyer:
>>I don't think it's necessarily the caffeine; more likely it's
>>the essential oils in the coffee which have an irritant effect.

>I'm sure it's the caffine, because the pills do the same.

I'm sure it's the caffeine too, because decaf doesn't do it to me,
while tea that's strong enough does.  Furthermore, I was told by at
least one good M.D. that the laxative effect of caffeine is part of
the reason for its popularity among the elderly.  Obviously there
are huge individual differences in response to this effect, from
people who don't notice it at all to people like me who feel it
after one cup of coffee on anything but a very full stomach (it
seems that if my stomach is very full, the caffeine gets absorbed
so slowly that it never reaches a high enough level to cause the
laxative effect).  I don't know how closely the laxative effect is
correlated with other effects, but I know that I am very sensitive
to other effects of caffeine -- 8-12 ozs. of coffee will often
suffice to give me hand tremors (sometimes even less).  On the rare
occasions when I want a caffeine kick, I'll have half regular, half
decaf to get a minimal dose.  Otherwise I avoid the stuff (it's a
good thing you can get good decaf these days, because I like the
taste of coffee), and my reaction to it all but guarantees that
I'll never become a caffeine {*filter*}. :-)

Oh, yes, and I do notice that I can feel the effect within 30 to
60 mins. after drinking coffee on a more or less empty stomach.  I
doubt that any irritating oils from the coffee would get to my large
intestine that quickly, so if caffeine is absorbed from the stomach
directly or from the upper reaches of the small intestine, the
timing of the effect would again point to caffeine as the culprit
rather than the oils in the coffee.

Daniel M. Rosenblum, Assistant Professor, Quantitative Studies Area,
   Graduate School of Management, Rutgers University (Newark)









Sun, 09 May 1993 03:36:36 GMT
 Coffee and diareaha

Quote:
>I've never heard of coffee acting as a laxative or causing diarrhea.

It's always been mysterious to me why coffee doesn't have more of this
reputation.  I've found that a couple of cups of freshly ground,
strong jet fuel are a quite reliable means to "regularity".
Typical coffee-machine or instant rotgut doesn't seem to have
this effect.

I am still inclined to attribute this to the irritant effects of the
essential oils found in high-quality freshly-brewed coffee.  However,
there is a putative mechanism for the contribution of caffeine to this
action.  Within the intestine, cyclic AMP activity seems to regulate
the excretion of water and electrolytes into the lumen.  Cholera toxin
causes its characteristic voluminous diarrhea by over-stimulating
adenylate cyclase in the cells of the wall of the intestine.  This
causes cAMP levels to rise, "turning on the faucet" as it were.  In
sufficient doses, caffeine inhibits phosphodiesterase, an enzyme
involved in the breakdown of cAMP.  This could have a similar, though
less dramatic, effect on the amount of water excreted into the lumen,
and its subsequent effect on GI motility.  Whether this is a serious
consideration at the doses of caffeine we're describing, I tend
to doubt.

--
Steve Dyer




Sun, 09 May 1993 07:21:07 GMT
 Coffee and diareaha

      Coffee can act as a laxative and/or cause diarreaha.

      What action of caffine and other stimulants causes this?

I was told some time ago that  coffee  causes  `colon  spasms',  which
leads to this result.  This is decidedly _non-scientific_  -  the  guy
that  told me this was a painter.. However, since the symptoms can hit
well before the coffee would make it through the system, I'm  inclined
to believe my friend. My experience also aligns with this `theory'.

I drink a lot of coffee (used to be a pot before work), and experience
this more the stronger the coffee is. The  body  builds  up  tolerance
over time, and I normally don't feel hyper or  otherwise  affected  by
coffee.

Total  withdrawl  from coffee can result in fairly long headaches, but
they go away in a day or so.

Apparently coffee is the most widely studied drug on the planet.

-Jim Becker
--
--    



Mon, 10 May 1993 03:52:28 GMT
 Coffee and diareaha


   JD
   >>>  Coffee can act as a laxative and/or cause diarreaha.
   >>>  What action of caffine and other stimulants causes this?

   Steve Dyer:
   >>I don't think it's necessarily the caffeine; more likely it's
   >>the essential oils in the coffee which have an irritant effect.

   JD again:
   >I'm sure it's the caffine, because the pills do the same.

Both the caffeine and the essential oils in coffee increase gastric
secretions.  Both are gastric and colon irritants.
--

   \    Flashing for the warriors whose strength is not to fight,    [my words]
    \   Flashing for the refugees on the unarmed road of flight,  [my opinions]
   / \   And for each and every underdog soldier in the night,
  /   \    And we gazed upon the chimes of freedom flashing.



Sat, 12 May 2001 00:19:41 GMT
 Coffee and diareaha


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Coffee and diareaha
From what I remember of  these things, caffeine is a phosphoidesterse
inhibitor, which means it delays the breakdown of cyclic AMP, the secondary
messenger for a lot of neural and hormonal systems.  The result of this
in the gut, is increased fluid into the lumen (by way of "leaky"
tight junctions I believe) and increased motility, hence more
fluid and shorter retention.  I'd be pleased to hear if this info is
outdated, and gladly bow to my betters...

--

  "No one is to be blamed for any damned fool thing I say, either."



Thu, 13 May 1993 03:27:25 GMT
 Coffee and diareaha

Quote:

>From what I remember of  these things, caffeine is a phosphoidesterse
>inhibitor, which means it delays the breakdown of cyclic AMP, the secondary
>messenger for a lot of neural and hormonal systems.  The result of this
>in the gut, is increased fluid into the lumen (by way of "leaky"
>tight junctions I believe) and increased motility, hence more
>fluid and shorter retention.  I'd be pleased to hear if this info is
>outdated, and gladly bow to my betters...

The problem with this theory is that caffeine is a phosphodiesterase
inhibitor only at millimolar concentrations which are physiologically
impossible to achieve in vivo.  Recent studies seem to point to caffeine
exerting many of its effects as a competitive inhibitor at adenosine
receptors.  But, the role of adenosine and adenosine receptors is pretty
murky compared to more classical neurotransmitters.  I don't have any
idea of whether or not adenosine plays a role in intestinal secretion or
motility.

--
Steve Dyer




Thu, 13 May 1993 04:48:39 GMT
 
 [ 9 post ] 

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