MDMA (1 of 2) 
Author Message
 MDMA (1 of 2)

"The  Drug Enforcement Administration will make 'Ecstasy' --  the
drug  MDMA -- illegal under an emergency ban effective July 1,  a
DEA source said yesterday.  /.../  DEA Acting Administrator John.
C. Lawn yesterday signed an order placing the drug under what  is
known  as  Schedule  1 of the  Controlled  Substances  Act,  said
another  source.   //   Schedule 1 contains  the  most  dangerous
{*filter*}, such as {*filter*}.  //  Possession of a 'trace' of a Schedule
1  drug could get a first-time offender 15 years in prison and  a
$125,000 fine, said a DEA spokesman.  //  MDMA --  3,4-methylene-
dioxymethamphetamine -- is chemically related to the hallucinogen
mescaline."  --- San Francisco Chronicle, 31 May 1985  (AP)

"To  psychiatrists, it is known as MDMA, a therapeutic drug  that
enhances  memory and quells anxiety.  To federal drug agents,  it
is  a  substance  known  as 'ecstasy' that  is  turning  up  with
worrisome  frequency  on  streets and  college  campuses.   /.../  
Chemically,  the  drug  is  3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine,  a
stimulant  derived from amphetamines.  Although the drug  is  not
currently   controlled,  DEA  officials  believe  it   is   being
manufactured  clandestinely in private laboratories.  /.../   Dr.
Lester  Grinspoon,  professor of psychiatry  at  Harvard  Medical
School,  said  MDMA apparently 'helps people get  in  touch  with
their  feelings.   //   'It diminishes  anxiety,  depression  and
defensiveness.  It helps recover memories.  It seems to have  the
capacity  to  help  people achieve insight and  put  things  into
perspective,' he told the Boston Globe.  //  'And unlike LSD,  it
seems  to be a controllable experience -- it doesn't take you  on
'bad trips.'  You don't have to go down any paths you don't  want
to go down.'"  --- San Francisco Chronicle, 31 May 1985  (AP)

"The  history  of  MDMA is not that of  another  trippy  chemical
rushed mindlessly from the laboratories into the street --  quite
the contrary, in fact.  For the past decade the drug's proponents
have been struggling to keep it under wraps, to control its  use,
to prevent the sort of public reaction that brought LSD  research
to  a  screeching halt in the late 1960s.  It was a  battle  they
were destined to lose, of course.  About five years ago, the drug
began  seeping  into  college  campuses,  gay  bars  and  discos.  
Inevitably,  it  came to the attention of  the  Drug  Enforcement
Administration,  which announced last summer that it intended  to
have  MDMA  'scheduled'  as a controlled substance:  to  make  it
illegal, in other words.  /.../  Another name that pops up  often
is  Alexander  Shulgin,  a respected Bay Area  chemist  and  drug
designer.   Shulgin  --  who refuses to  speak  publicly  but  is
cooperating  with those who retained the law firm to defend  MDMA  
-- didn't invent the drug, but he certainly helped to  popularize
it.  Before he began publishing research papers on MDMA in  1975,
it had languished in almost total obscurity since being  patented
in  1914  by  Merck  &  Company,  Inc.  as  a  possible  appetite
suppressant.   /.../  Shulgin has said that the drug was  already
in  use when it was brought to his attention in the early  1970s.  
He   had   been   experimenting  with   members   of   the   same
pharmacological family: synthetic derivatives of oil of sassafras
and  nutmeg  that  are  structurally  similar  to  mescaline  and
amphetamines.   Other members of the family -- MMDA, MDA --  have
enjoyed  vogues as mild hallucinogens.  But Shulfin soon came  to
believe that MDMA was something quite different, a step  forward.  
Its  active ingredient was the opposite isomer (an isomer is  one
half  of a molecule of any compound) from the one active  in  the
hallucinogenic  members of the family.  //  'The effect was  much
different  from  MDA,' recalls Dr. Caludio  Naranjo,  who  worked
closely with Shulgin.  'MDMA was not hallucinogenic.  It  seemed,
too, less toxic than MDA.  When administered in small doses there
were  few,  if any, side effects: a slight jaw  tightening,  some
nausea,  and  those symptoms would pass in the  first  half-hour.  
And the psychological effect -- it was completely different  from
any other drug.  It was like a brief, fleeting moment of sanity.'  
/.../   Shulgin,  Naranjo and the other  early  researchers  were
struck by how predictable the effects of MDMA were -- at least in
a   therapeutic  setting.   'It  has  proven  to  be   remarkably
consistent  in  chronology (the duration of action is  about  one
hour),'  Shulgin  wrote in 1963, 'and  dosage  requirements  (the
effective dosage is 100-150 mgs. orally).  In most aspects, it is
deceptively  simple  in  action, leading to  sensory  and  verbal
disinhibition,  a  state of mutual trust and  confidence  between
client  and  therapist, but without the  distractions  of  visual
distortion  or compelling introspection.'"  --- Joe  Klein,  "The
New  Drug  They Call Ecstasy", San Francisco Chronicle,  23  June
1985  (New York magazine)  

"A Harvard research psychiatrist who is fighting the government's
ban  on  the drug called Ecstasy is ready for a final  battle  --
before  the Supreme Court.  //  He has taken the drug, and  under
carefully controlled conditions he calls it a 'gentle  invitation
to  insight -- the mirror image of paranoia.'  //  But  far  from
extolling  its  current widespread reputation  as  the  'Yuppies'
high,'  he insists that it must be legally restricted,  kept  off
the  street  and used only as an aid to psychotherapy.   //   Dr.
Lester  Grinspoon, associate professor of psychiatry  at  Harvard
Medical  School, has been controversial since the stormy days  of
the  1960s  when  psychedelics were the hallmark of  the  Age  of
Aquarius  and he was opposing the criminalization  of  {*filter*}.  
//  He has researched them all: LSD, pot, speed, {*filter*}, {*filter*},
Angel Dust and now the one that scientists know by its scientific
initials as MDMA.  //  Yesterday, at a symposium sponsored by the
Council  for  the Advancement of Science  Writing  and  Carnegie-
Mellon University, Grinspoon described his running fight over the
current  rigid  restrictions on MDMA posed by  the  federal  Drug
Enforcement Administration.  //  The drug agency has placed  MDMA
on  its 'Schedule 1' list since 1985 -- meaning it is  deemed  to
have a high potential for abuse, it has no medical utility and it
cannot  be used safely, even by physicians.  //  The  ban  limits
researchers  to  surveys of street users, whose  reports  of  the
drug's  effects  are  anecdotal,  uncontrolled  and   essentially
unverifiable.   There  has been no controlled human  research  to
determine  the  drug's  precise effects  --  whether  harmful  or
benign.    //    After  the   Drug   Enforcement   Administration
essentially banned the legal use of MDMA for medical research  in
1985, Grinspoon won a court order lifting the rigid 'Schedule  1'
restriction.   //   At  Grinspoon's request a  federal  court  in
Boston  ordered  the drug agency to place MDMA in  'Schedule  3,'
which  permits  medical researchers to use  the  substance  under
carefully  regulated  conditions but gives the drug  agency  full
power to seize unauthorized supplies and arrest street users  and
dealers.  //  The federal agency, however, invoked its  emergency
powers  to  ban  the  drug  as  dangerous  and  kept  its   rigid
restrictions in force.  So Grinspoon appealed.  He won again, and
now  the  Justice Department is planning a final  appeal  to  the
Supreme Court.  //  Meanwhile, Ecstasy remains in the same  legal
class  as LSD, {*filter*} and even {*filter*}, Grinspoon noted."   ---
David Perlman, San Francisco Examiner, 11 November 1987  

--  
Uucp: ...{gatech,ames,rutgers}!ncar!asuvax!stjhmc!125!7!larry.moore



Sun, 01 Nov 1992 22:07:40 GMT
 MDMA (1 of 2)

Quote:

}"The  Drug Enforcement Administration will make 'Ecstasy' --  the
}drug  MDMA -- illegal under an emergency ban effective July 1,  a
}DEA source said yesterday. /.../  DEA Acting Administrator John.
}C. Lawn yesterday signed an order placing the drug under what  is
}known  as  Schedule  1 of the  Controlled  Substances  Act,  said
}another  source.   //   Schedule 1 contains  the  most  dangerous
}{*filter*}, such as {*filter*}. ...

Did I misread your posting, or was there not even a hint of any actual
problems, either medical or societal, attributed to MDMA?  I guess I
shouldn't be surprised, but it still continues to bother me the extent
to which the DEA has {*filter*}ed the intent of the classification
machinery to use it as a political tool, with hardly even a nod of the
head toward any health or medical considerations....

  /Bernie\



Mon, 02 Nov 1992 20:45:44 GMT
 MDMA (1 of 2)

Quote:


> }"The  Drug Enforcement Administration will make 'Ecstasy' --  the
> }drug  MDMA -- illegal under an emergency ban effective July 1,  a
> }DEA source said yesterday. /.../  DEA Acting Administrator John.
> }C. Lawn yesterday signed an order placing the drug under what  is
> }known  as  Schedule  1 of the  Controlled  Substances  Act,  said
> }another  source.   //   Schedule 1 contains  the  most  dangerous
> }{*filter*}, such as {*filter*}. ...

> Did I misread your posting, or was there not even a hint of any actual
> problems, either medical or societal, attributed to MDMA?  I guess I
> shouldn't be surprised, but it still continues to bother me the extent
> to which the DEA has {*filter*}ed the intent of the classification
> machinery to use it as a political tool, with hardly even a nod of the
> head toward any health or medical considerations....

the nation's policy about this is entirely clear.  it is tacit, not
explicit, and it has nothing to do with the law.  but it is very clear:

"The citizens shall be prohibited from ingesting substances into their
own bodies if the purpose of such activity is to achieve a pleasant
state of consciousness.  The only excpetions to this prohibition are
{*filter*}, nicotine, and any substance that is prescribed by a physician
for explicit reasons other than those concerning enjoyment of life."

there is no ambiguity about this policy at all.  The only complication
arises because the government must carry out this policy under the charade
of protecting health.  Thus, everytime a different substance finds favor
among the citizens, the government must claim health risks to justify
the prohibition.  This is not particularly difficult to do, as misuse of
any matter can lead to negative consequences.  Nonetheless, it does
put the government in the position pf being, at essence, liars.  Actually,
one would think that the government could easily be more convincing than it
actually is at building evidence supporting the health risk dangers.  It
seems that they don;t really try, as if the claim of danger itself is
sufficient....

--
Russell Shackelford
The College of Computing
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, 30332



Tue, 03 Nov 1992 00:42:59 GMT
 MDMA (1 of 2)

Quote:

>the nation's policy about this is entirely clear.  it is tacit, not
>explicit, and it has nothing to do with the law.  but it is very clear:

>"The citizens shall be prohibited from ingesting substances into their
>own bodies if the purpose of such activity is to achieve a pleasant
>state of consciousness.  The only excpetions to this prohibition are
>{*filter*}, nicotine, and any substance that is prescribed by a physician
>for explicit reasons other than those concerning enjoyment of life."

Well, I think this is a *little* overstated!  

Consider the accepted use of antidepressants; one of the diagnostic
terms that comes up quite frequently is "anhedonia" - literally, "no
pleasure".  Those not getting a normal (sic) degree of enjoyment out of
their life are recognized as possibly being depressed, and
antidepressants prescribed accordingly.  


Andrea Frankel, Hewlett-Packard (San Diego Division) (619) 592-4664
        "wake now!  Discover that you are the song that the morning brings..."
______________________________________________________________________________
UUCP     : {hplabs|nosc|hpfcla|ucsd}!hp-sdd!andrea


USnail   : 16399 W. Bernardo Drive, San Diego CA 92127-1899 USA



Tue, 10 Nov 1992 08:14:50 GMT
 
 [ 4 post ] 

 Relevant Pages 

1. Alt.drugs.Gamma-OH.MDMA (G.H.B,4-OHB,Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate and MDMA)

2. MDMA and self-esteem

3. MDMA (2 of 2)

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5. MDMA - methylenedioxymethamphetamine info required

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