Goats which thrive on sea water . 
Author Message
 Goats which thrive on sea water .

        Surely this is against the laws of physics . If {*filter*} is less salty
than sea water the goats kidneys could never concentrate,,

 Top stories
  across papers

 Photo gallery
 Weather
 Indiatimes

  Interview

  Letters

  Crossword
   Java
   Image

  Times
  Cricket
  Ratings

  Today's
  Chat

 ET Quick Qoute

 Type the name of the
 company to get the
 latest BSE/NSE stock
     quote

              Pure seawater only for goats from
              Andamans

              By Chandrika Mago

              The Times of India News Service

              PORT BLAIR: Seawater-guzzling goats which survive in
              inhospitable island terrain without freshwater, and fowl
              which lay many more eggs than the usual average. These
              aren't characters from the magical world of children's
books
              but species which have made the Andaman and Nicobar
              Islands their home. They are now being studied and
              propagated by the Central Agricultural Research
Institute
              (CARI) based here.

              The feral goat on the uninhabited lava-spewing Barren
              Island - said to have been left behind by a station
steamer in
              1891 - has adapted itself to the hostile conditions,
drinking
              up to 600 ml of seawater a day and feeding on succulent
              tree leaves.

              Used to a solitary life, these medium-size, stout and
              short-legged animals graze at dawn and dusk, retiring to
the
              shade during peak sunshine hours. They take what they
can
              of the dew on leaves and rainwater in small rock
pockets.

              CARI is now suggesting new homes for these toughened
              creatures. Its director, S P S Ahlawat, says these
prolific
              breeders need no care and suggests exploring the
possibility
              of rearing and mulitplying these animals for meat on
several
              other uninhabited isles where freshwater is scarce. It
would
              help meet cooking.net">food requirements and won't cost much, says
              CARI, calling for in-depth study to understand the
              dynamics of the goat's seawater metabolism.

              There haven't really been any experiments so far to find
out
              if these goats can flourish elsewhere. A few years ago,
with
              government permission, Ahlawat says his team brought
              across six of the few hundred animals on Barren Island -
to
              study and conserve precious germplasm. These were kept
              in farm conditions and domesticated, being introduced
              gradually to fodder trees similar to what they were used
to.
              They thrived. Meat quality was similar to the Black
Bengal
              goat but milk production was poor.

              But it couldn't go much further. For one, these animals
need
              ``pure seawater'' - they were smart enough to reject the
              artificial salt water CARI's team got ready. It's a
              programme the government really needs to take up, says
              Ahlawat.

              CARI has gone much further with the second magical beast
              on these isles - the short-legged, hardy and
              disease-resistant Nicobari fowl which needs no
vaccination
              or healthcare and lives happily in coastal areas. It's
better
              than the ``mongrel population'' of birds from the
mainland,
              says Ahlawat.

              Over the past 15 years, black and white strains of this
              indigenous bird have been developed through intensive
              selection and mating. Egg production is between 160 and
              170 a year, ``much higher than any desi bird living on
open
              range''.

              It's one of CARI's major programmes. Ahlawat says there
              is heavy demand for this bird from the islands and other
              parts of the country. The institute gives 5,000 chicks
each
              year to locals for backyard farming - it's still not
enough.
              The requirement is so great ``we can't meet the local
              demand...and we don't have enough parental stock to
              send.''



Mon, 28 Oct 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Goats which thrive on sea water .

        Surely this is against the laws of physics . If {*filter*} is less salty
than sea water the goats kidneys could never concentrate,,

              Pure seawater only for goats from
              Andamans

              By Chandrika Mago

              The Times of India News Service

              PORT BLAIR: Seawater-guzzling goats which survive in
              inhospitable island terrain without freshwater, and fowl
              which lay many more eggs than the usual average. These
              aren't characters from the magical world of children's
books
              but species which have made the Andaman and Nicobar
              Islands their home. They are now being studied and
              propagated by the Central Agricultural Research
Institute
              (CARI) based here.

              The feral goat on the uninhabited lava-spewing Barren
              Island - said to have been left behind by a station
steamer in
              1891 - has adapted itself to the hostile conditions,
drinking
              up to 600 ml of seawater a day and feeding on succulent
              tree leaves.

              Used to a solitary life, these medium-size, stout and
              short-legged animals graze at dawn and dusk, retiring to
the
              shade during peak sunshine hours. They take what they
can
              of the dew on leaves and rainwater in small rock
pockets.

              CARI is now suggesting new homes for these toughened
              creatures. Its director, S P S Ahlawat, says these
prolific
              breeders need no care and suggests exploring the
possibility
              of rearing and mulitplying these animals for meat on
several
              other uninhabited isles where freshwater is scarce. It
would
              help meet cooking.net">food requirements and won't cost much, says
              CARI, calling for in-depth study to understand the
              dynamics of the goat's seawater metabolism.

              There haven't really been any experiments so far to find
out
              if these goats can flourish elsewhere. A few years ago,
with
              government permission, Ahlawat says his team brought
              across six of the few hundred animals on Barren Island -
to
              study and conserve precious germplasm. These were kept
              in farm conditions and domesticated, being introduced
              gradually to fodder trees similar to what they were used
to.
              They thrived. Meat quality was similar to the Black
Bengal
              goat but milk production was poor.

              But it couldn't go much further. For one, these animals
need
              ``pure seawater'' - they were smart enough to reject the
              artificial salt water CARI's team got ready. It's a
              programme the government really needs to take up, says
              Ahlawat.

              CARI has gone much further with the second magical beast
              on these isles - the short-legged, hardy and
              disease-resistant Nicobari fowl which needs no
vaccination
              or healthcare and lives happily in coastal areas. It's
better
              than the ``mongrel population'' of birds from the
mainland,
              says Ahlawat.

              Over the past 15 years, black and white strains of this
              indigenous bird have been developed through intensive
              selection and mating. Egg production is between 160 and
              170 a year, ``much higher than any desi bird living on
open
              range''.

              It's one of CARI's major programmes. Ahlawat says there
              is heavy demand for this bird from the islands and other
              parts of the country. The institute gives 5,000 chicks
each
              year to locals for backyard farming - it's still not
enough.
              The requirement is so great ``we can't meet the local
              demand...and we don't have enough parental stock to
              send.''



Mon, 28 Oct 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Goats which thrive on sea water .

Quote:

>    Surely this is against the laws of physics . If {*filter*} is less salty
>than sea water the goats kidneys could never concentrate,,

There are sea-birds that can excrete salt, through special glands.
Thus it is possible for an organism to have an adaptation to allow use
of concentrated salt solution.

Don't know about goats.

bob



Mon, 28 Oct 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Goats which thrive on sea water .
They may have other specialized glands to excrete the excess salt,

Nothing defies the laws of Physics, Mo. The only exception, of course, is
P.Siddarth.

Madurai Veeran


Quote:

> Surely this is against the laws of physics . If {*filter*} is less salty
> than sea water the goats kidneys could never concentrate,,

>               Pure seawater only for goats from
>               Andamans

>               By Chandrika Mago

>               The Times of India News Service

>               PORT BLAIR: Seawater-guzzling goats which survive in
>               inhospitable island terrain without freshwater, and fowl
>               which lay many more eggs than the usual average. These
>               aren't characters from the magical world of children's
> books
>               but species which have made the Andaman and Nicobar
>               Islands their home. They are now being studied and
>               propagated by the Central Agricultural Research
> Institute
>               (CARI) based here.

>               The feral goat on the uninhabited lava-spewing Barren
>               Island - said to have been left behind by a station
> steamer in
>               1891 - has adapted itself to the hostile conditions,
> drinking
>               up to 600 ml of seawater a day and feeding on succulent
>               tree leaves.

>               Used to a solitary life, these medium-size, stout and
>               short-legged animals graze at dawn and dusk, retiring to
> the
>               shade during peak sunshine hours. They take what they
> can
>               of the dew on leaves and rainwater in small rock
> pockets.

>               CARI is now suggesting new homes for these toughened
>               creatures. Its director, S P S Ahlawat, says these
> prolific
>               breeders need no care and suggests exploring the
> possibility
>               of rearing and mulitplying these animals for meat on
> several
>               other uninhabited isles where freshwater is scarce. It
> would
>               help meet cooking.net">food requirements and won't cost much, says
>               CARI, calling for in-depth study to understand the
>               dynamics of the goat's seawater metabolism.

>               There haven't really been any experiments so far to find
> out
>               if these goats can flourish elsewhere. A few years ago,
> with
>               government permission, Ahlawat says his team brought
>               across six of the few hundred animals on Barren Island -
> to
>               study and conserve precious germplasm. These were kept
>               in farm conditions and domesticated, being introduced
>               gradually to fodder trees similar to what they were used
> to.
>               They thrived. Meat quality was similar to the Black
> Bengal
>               goat but milk production was poor.

>               But it couldn't go much further. For one, these animals
> need
>               ``pure seawater'' - they were smart enough to reject the
>               artificial salt water CARI's team got ready. It's a
>               programme the government really needs to take up, says
>               Ahlawat.

>               CARI has gone much further with the second magical beast
>               on these isles - the short-legged, hardy and
>               disease-resistant Nicobari fowl which needs no
> vaccination
>               or healthcare and lives happily in coastal areas. It's
> better
>               than the ``mongrel population'' of birds from the
> mainland,
>               says Ahlawat.

>               Over the past 15 years, black and white strains of this
>               indigenous bird have been developed through intensive
>               selection and mating. Egg production is between 160 and
>               170 a year, ``much higher than any desi bird living on
> open
>               range''.

>               It's one of CARI's major programmes. Ahlawat says there
>               is heavy demand for this bird from the islands and other
>               parts of the country. The institute gives 5,000 chicks
> each
>               year to locals for backyard farming - it's still not
> enough.
>               The requirement is so great ``we can't meet the local
>               demand...and we don't have enough parental stock to
>               send.''



Mon, 28 Oct 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Goats which thrive on sea water .
Sounds to me like they get most of their water from the leaves.    The small
amount of seawater they drink is probably to get the amount of salt they
need.   Succulent is not a term denoting "tasty", it describes a type of leaf
common in arid areas that stores a large amount of water.  In fact, the goats
may get so much water content from the leaves that this increases their need
for salt and hence causes them to drink a small amount of seawater.   (If you
want an idea of how much moisture a succulent leaf contains, cut open a cactus
of aloe vera leaf and squeeze it.)

I suspect that the goats are not drinking the sea water for its water content
but rather for the salt!

Quote:

>         Surely this is against the laws of physics . If {*filter*} is less salty
> than sea water the goats kidneys could never concentrate,,

>               Pure seawater only for goats from
>               Andamans

>               By Chandrika Mago

>               The Times of India News Service

>               PORT BLAIR: Seawater-guzzling goats which survive in
>               inhospitable island terrain without freshwater, and fowl
>               which lay many more eggs than the usual average. These
>               aren't characters from the magical world of children's
> books
>               but species which have made the Andaman and Nicobar
>               Islands their home. They are now being studied and
>               propagated by the Central Agricultural Research
> Institute
>               (CARI) based here.

>               The feral goat on the uninhabited lava-spewing Barren
>               Island - said to have been left behind by a station
> steamer in
>               1891 - has adapted itself to the hostile conditions,
> drinking
>               up to 600 ml of seawater a day and feeding on succulent
>               tree leaves.

>               Used to a solitary life, these medium-size, stout and
>               short-legged animals graze at dawn and dusk, retiring to
> the
>               shade during peak sunshine hours. They take what they
> can
>               of the dew on leaves and rainwater in small rock
> pockets.

>               CARI is now suggesting new homes for these toughened
>               creatures. Its director, S P S Ahlawat, says these
> prolific
>               breeders need no care and suggests exploring the
> possibility
>               of rearing and mulitplying these animals for meat on
> several
>               other uninhabited isles where freshwater is scarce. It
> would
>               help meet cooking.net">food requirements and won't cost much, says
>               CARI, calling for in-depth study to understand the
>               dynamics of the goat's seawater metabolism.

>               There haven't really been any experiments so far to find
> out
>               if these goats can flourish elsewhere. A few years ago,
> with
>               government permission, Ahlawat says his team brought
>               across six of the few hundred animals on Barren Island -
> to
>               study and conserve precious germplasm. These were kept
>               in farm conditions and domesticated, being introduced
>               gradually to fodder trees similar to what they were used
> to.
>               They thrived. Meat quality was similar to the Black
> Bengal
>               goat but milk production was poor.

>               But it couldn't go much further. For one, these animals
> need
>               ``pure seawater'' - they were smart enough to reject the
>               artificial salt water CARI's team got ready. It's a
>               programme the government really needs to take up, says
>               Ahlawat.

>               CARI has gone much further with the second magical beast
>               on these isles - the short-legged, hardy and
>               disease-resistant Nicobari fowl which needs no
> vaccination
>               or healthcare and lives happily in coastal areas. It's
> better
>               than the ``mongrel population'' of birds from the
> mainland,
>               says Ahlawat.

>               Over the past 15 years, black and white strains of this
>               indigenous bird have been developed through intensive
>               selection and mating. Egg production is between 160 and
>               170 a year, ``much higher than any desi bird living on
> open
>               range''.

>               It's one of CARI's major programmes. Ahlawat says there
>               is heavy demand for this bird from the islands and other
>               parts of the country. The institute gives 5,000 chicks
> each
>               year to locals for backyard farming - it's still not
> enough.
>               The requirement is so great ``we can't meet the local
>               demand...and we don't have enough parental stock to
>               send.''



Wed, 30 Oct 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 
 [ 5 post ] 

 Relevant Pages 

1. Sea water consumption

2. sea water

3. sea water

4. Current News About water softeners. home depot water softeners,water softeners reviews,fixing water softeners,permutit water softeners,the best water softeners

5. water tanks : Recent News. plastic water tanks,livestock water tanks,salt water tanks,water tanks manufacturers,underground water tanks

6. Failure to Thrive Syndrome

7. post-illeostomy failure to thrive

8. Failure To Thrive

9. Life thrives in radioactive Chernobyl .

10. NO PROPER CARE FOR CANCER PATIENTS, BUT DOCTORS THRIVE

11. Pyloroplasty and failure to thrive

12. Failure to Thrive


 
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software