MOTION SICKNESS 
Author Message
 MOTION SICKNESS

My 11 year old son seems to suddenly have a big problem with motion sickness.
Sunny days are worse. After 15 mins headache sets in, followed by waves of
nausea. Gets a tad pale, too...

The motion sickness pills (generic version of Drammamine) work, using 1/2
pills.

Question is this: What causes this, and is there any way to stave it's effects
without resorting to any form of medications?

 Thanks in advance.

--  
Uucp: ...{gatech,ames,rutgers}!ncar!asuvax!stjhmc!260!150!Rhonda



Mon, 12 Oct 1992 22:32:18 GMT
 MOTION SICKNESS

Quote:

>My 11 year old son seems to suddenly have a big problem with motion sickness.
>Sunny days are worse. After 15 mins headache sets in, followed by waves of
>nausea. Gets a tad pale, too...

>The motion sickness pills (generic version of Drammamine) work, using 1/2
>pills.

>Question is this: What causes this, and is there any way to stave it's effects
>without resorting to any form of medications?

Motion sickness and migraine are closely related in children.  I know of
no way to prevent it other than medication (or avoiding riding in cars,
boats, or planes).


Tue, 13 Oct 1992 02:31:06 GMT
 MOTION SICKNESS

Quote:


>Question is this: What causes this, and is there any way to stave it's effects
>without resorting to any form of medications?

From my biology class I recall that this is caused by `conflicting'
signals sent to the brain. There is a motion sensory organ right
behind the ear, shaped as 3 rings, filled with fluids. Each ring
senses one dimension (up-down, forward-backward and left-right).
Motion causes the fluid to flow and move sensory hairs in the organ
which send signals to the brain that the body is in motion.
Now, another source of motion sensory is sight. The motion sickness
problem arises when the data from the eyes and the ear-organ (what's
it called ? Balance organ or something) conflict. For instance,
when flying on the plane, you see no motion and yet you `feel' you
are going forward.

The cure ? It helps to see where you are going. Also, sitting on
the frontseat of a car (having plain view of where you are going)
helps.

--
Shun Yan Cheung, Georgia Insitute of Technology, Atlanta Georgia, 30332

uucp:    {akgua,allegra,amd,hplabs,seismo,ut-ngp}!gatech!bay!cheung



Tue, 13 Oct 1992 03:08:29 GMT
 MOTION SICKNESS
Quote:

> My 11 year old son seems to suddenly have a big problem with motion sickness.
> Sunny days are worse. After 15 mins headache sets in, followed by waves of
> nausea. Gets a tad pale, too...

> The motion sickness pills (generic version of Drammamine) work, using 1/2
> pills.

> Question is this: What causes this, and is there any way to stave it's effects
> without resorting to any form of medications?

Recent research revealed that ginger works as well as dramamine(sp?).

Can't give you the citation, but it should be easy to find in any
med library.....

I forget the exact dosage recommended, but one option was to ingest ginger
in drink or on food, the other option was to rely on ginger ale!!!

russ

--
Russell Shackelford
School of Information and Computer Science
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, 30332



Tue, 13 Oct 1992 06:42:42 GMT
 MOTION SICKNESS

Quote:

> What causes [motion sickness], and is there any way to stave off its
> effects without resorting to any form of medications?

I know of one doctor who claims a 60-70% success rate with an "acupuncture
band", a wristband with knobs that press in the appropriate places.  BUT,
these only work if very carefully fitted.  If you can't find a practitioner
who really understands them, forget it.

--
--  Jack Campin   Computing Science Department, Glasgow University, 17 Lilybank
Gardens, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland   041 339 8855 x6044 work  041 556 1878 home




Tue, 13 Oct 1992 22:22:30 GMT
 MOTION SICKNESS

Quote:

> My 11 year old son seems to suddenly have a big problem with motion sickness.
> Sunny days are worse. After 15 mins headache sets in, followed by waves of
> nausea. Gets a tad pale, too...

> The motion sickness pills (generic version of Drammamine) work, using 1/2
> pills.

> Question is this: What causes this, and is there any way to stave it's effects
> without resorting to any form of medications?

>  Thanks in advance.

> --  
> Uucp: ...{gatech,ames,rutgers}!ncar!asuvax!stjhmc!260!150!Rhonda


It might help if you make sure he has something in his
stomach before starting a trip - nothing greasy or heavy, but
perhaps bread or crackers or something starchy. Offer this to
him, along with maybe a coke, throughout the trip.
The other thing that might help is to not let him do things
like read, etc in the car, but rather look out the window at
far off images. Do not look at things close to the car, boat,
whatever.
This works for me whenever I go deep sea fishing and I am often
the only one on the boat who does not get sick.
Good luck!
Vicki


Wed, 14 Oct 1992 00:11:24 GMT
 MOTION SICKNESS


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 MOTION SICKNESS

Quote:

>My 11 year old son seems to suddenly have a big problem with motion sickness.
>Sunny days are worse. After 15 mins headache sets in, followed by waves of
>nausea. Gets a tad pale, too...

What specifically does he get the motion sickness in response to?
You say he suddenly has this problem.  Is the stimulus new to him?  For
example, if he gets car sick, have you recently got a new family car or
has he gone for rides in one in the past with no problem?  The best thing
to do, especially if this problem has come on suddenly, is to have him
checked over by a doctor, to exclude organic causes and be sure it's only
motion sickness.

Quote:
>Question is this: What causes this, and is there any way to stave it's effects
>without resorting to any form of medications?

Without going into any detail, motion sickness is a normal response to
motion stimuli with which the individual is unfamiliar and is consequently
unadapted.  Yes - there are ways to help prevent it without using {*filter*}.
Here are some that can be tried:
   . Sit as close to the centre of gravity of the vehicle as possible.
   . Reduce head movement to a minimum using head support or by lying down.
   . Sit so that a stable reference point can be seen (e.g. the horizon).
   . If there is no outside reference, then close the eyes to reduce the
     visual vestibular conflict.
   . If possible, perform a task to take the mind off the syndrome; a driver
     of a car or helmsman of a boat seldom gets motion sickness.

Susceptibility to motion sickness alters with age.  There's a marked
increase in susceptibility between 3 and 12 years, followed by a decrease
as age increases.  Anxiety is also thought to increase susceptibility.
Motion sickness can be a conditioned response, as seen in the passenger
who feels ill the moment they step aboard a boat, even when it's still in
the marina.  And remember that adaptation occurs.

--
Gerry Macridis, PO Box 3929, Wellington, NEW ZEALAND.  Phone: +64 4 899444.



Fri, 16 Oct 1992 16:48:23 GMT
 
 [ 8 post ] 

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