Frank's Dementia... 
Author Message
 Frank's Dementia...



 Newsgroups: sci.med.aids
 Approved:
 Subject: There's a {*filter*} in San Francisco!

 Date: Fri,  9 Jan 1998 10:08:33 CDT
 Organization: unspecified


 >Further, the accuracy of these infection statistics may also be
 >confirmed by the UNEXPLAINED 2-year delay in publishing this
 >data. After all, when the study was received by the Journal
 >AIDS in November, 1995, there were substantial reasons for
 >wanting to delay the release of this critical data, and none of
 >those reasons had anything to do with accuracy. For example,
 >during the November 1995 timeframe:
 >
 >(1) the new protease inhibitor{*filter*}tails were being
 >    established as the new standard of care;
 >(2) the Vancouver International AIDS Conference was only
 >    eight months away; and

 Sounds like you talked to the editor of the journal and the authors of
the
 study, Mr Shaw. So, there's a {*filter*} again? Editorial boards of
 journals, reviewers, scientists and drug companies are all involved in
a
 giant scheme of suppressing data to push the new {*filter*}??? It might be
 informative to scan journals not only for interesting papers, but also
for
 timing of publication of particular studies. You'll find that, on
occassion
 it takes a while before a manuscript is published.

 There are plenty of reasons for a delay. Submitting your paper during
the
 holiday period. Unconvinced reviewers requesting an extensive rewrite
or
 additional experiments/analyses. Competition for space in a journal.
This
 'UNEXPLAINED 2-year delay' is disappointing, but really not surprising
at
 all. It happens to many studies and there's no manuscript that's
accepted
 and printed within a week after being received by the editorial office.

 >It is important to note that the central theme of redefining
 >the AIDS case definition -- and expanding the government
 >assistance for those meeting the definition -- was obvious:
 >twice as many people became eligible for the antiviral drug
 >treatments.

 So scientists, government officials and journal editors have a magic
crystal
 ball on their desk. Wish I had one. With the ball you can predict
future
 developments in HIV research and what {*filter*} are under development.
Which of
 these will work. When those {*filter*} are gonna hit the market. It provides
a
 telephone number to the conspirators so everybody can benefit of the
scheme
 and get rich.

 And there's not a single scientist, physician or journal editor who
speaks
 out when hearing of the plan. And nobody in the medical community
thinks
 about the well-being of patients or how to keep them alive. They're all
in
 for the money and fame, right? A very interesting view.

 Frank Raaphorst

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 Frank M. Raaphorst, PhD

 University of Texas Health Science Center
 Department of Microbiology
 7703 Floyd Curl Drive
 San Antonio, Texas 78284, USA

 Tel    : (210) 567-3974
 Fax    : (210) 567-6612

;



Sun, 10 Dec 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Frank's Dementia...

Quote:



> So, there's a {*filter*} again? Editorial boards of journals,
> reviewers, scientists and drug companies are involved in a giant scheme of
> suppressing data to push {*filter*}?

> It might be informative to scan journals not only for interesting papers,
> but also for timing of publication of manuscripts. You'll find that it
> sometimes takes a while before a manuscript is printed.

"A while"? Be specific, Frank.

Frank, please offer us your brilliant insights and cite some
articles in the Journal AIDS that took 2+ years to go
from submission to publication.

fred



Mon, 11 Dec 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 
 [ 4 post ] 

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