Terminology help required. 
Author Message
 Terminology help required.

Hi peeps,
        I need to know the correct terminology for the condition whereby
sensory input is analysed by more than one part of the brain, ie people
see smells and hear colours.

        Hours of fruitless searching has led me to believe that I'll have
to speak med. talk to get anywhere.

        If anyone has a url even better.

TIA

--
Bob
Mediocracy expert



Mon, 30 Dec 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Terminology help required.

Quote:
(Bob of Stoneybridge) writes:

>Hi peeps,
>    I need to know the correct terminology for the condition whereby
>sensory input is analysed by more than one part of the brain, ie
people
>see smells and hear colours.

>    Hours of fruitless searching has led me to believe that I'll have
>to speak med. talk to get anywhere.

>    If anyone has a url even better.

>TIA

>--
>Bob
>Mediocracy expert

  Synesthesia or synaesthesia.  It's actually pretty common, if you
count all those people who think that certain numerals should have a
natural color, and who see them that way (blue 7's, etc).  Feynman and
a lot of great physicists and mathematicians have been that way.


Tue, 31 Dec 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Terminology help required.

says...
Quote:

>   Synesthesia or synaesthesia.  It's actually pretty common, if you
> count all those people who think that certain numerals should have a
> natural color, and who see them that way (blue 7's, etc).  Feynman and
> a lot of great physicists and mathematicians have been that way.

Love you, love you, love you heaps. (but not in the biblical sense)

ta very much...

--
Bob
Mediocracy expert



Tue, 31 Dec 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Terminology help required.


Quote:

>(Bob of Stoneybridge) writes:

>>Hi peeps,
>>        I need to know the correct terminology for the condition whereby
>>sensory input is analysed by more than one part of the brain, ie
>>people see smells and hear colours.

>>        Hours of fruitless searching has led me to believe that I'll have
>>to speak med. talk to get anywhere.

>  Synesthesia or synaesthesia.  It's actually pretty common, if you
>count all those people who think that certain numerals should have a
>natural color, and who see them that way (blue 7's, etc).  Feynman and
>a lot of great physicists and mathematicians have been that way.

Different musical keys have different colors as well.  E-flat is a
beautiful silvery color, G-major is green, and F-major is kind of
orangey-yellow, to me at least.  The days of the week have colors too.


Tue, 31 Dec 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Terminology help required.

Quote:

> Different musical keys have different colors as well.  E-flat is a
> beautiful silvery color, G-major is green, and F-major is kind of
> orangey-yellow, to me at least.  The days of the week have colors too.

this definitely is your interpretation.  i've heard the notion of
musical "color" but it was in the auditory sense, i.e. a color might
be associated with one of the modes.  beyond that you hear of people
describing a tune as having a "dark" color but that has more to do
with mood than what's you're describing.

the same applies to days of the week.  i have heard of "blue monday"
but that generally refers to a nightclub or radio station which
regularly plays blues music on that particular day of the week.

--
  __  ______  __  / __/ |
_/ (_(_) / (_(_/_/_(_/  .
be optimistic!  you can win,
as long as you keep, your head to the sky
                        -the sounds of blackness



Tue, 31 Dec 2002 03:00:00 GMT
 Terminology help required.

Quote:


>> Different musical keys have different colors as well.  E-flat is a
>> beautiful silvery color, G-major is green, and F-major is kind of
>> orangey-yellow, to me at least.  The days of the week have colors
too.

>this definitely is your interpretation.  i've heard the notion of
>musical "color" but it was in the auditory sense, i.e. a color might
>be associated with one of the modes.  beyond that you hear of people
>describing a tune as having a "dark" color but that has more to do
>with mood than what's you're describing.

  Yes. Minor keys, as we all know, tend to melancholy. E-flat minor can
be particularly dark. I think of one of my favorite peices in all the
world-- the extravigantly romantic 0p. 39 Rachmaninoff E-flat minor
etude tableau (no. 5) which is as dark as the inside of an old deserted
mansion at night full of antique furniture.  Demands to be played on an
old grand with a candelabra.....

   However, there's another shorter and earlier E-flat minor etude
which fairly dances, and I think really is a bit "silvery" (at least as
played by a professional). There's just the undercurrent of melancholy
in it, all but lost.  Of course there's more to mood in music than key.



Wed, 01 Jan 2003 03:00:00 GMT
 Terminology help required.


Quote:


>>> Different musical keys have different colors as well.  E-flat is a
>>> beautiful silvery color, G-major is green, and F-major is kind of
>>> orangey-yellow, to me at least.  The days of the week have colors
>>> too.

>>this definitely is your interpretation.  i've heard the notion of
>>musical "color" but it was in the auditory sense, i.e. a color might
>>be associated with one of the modes.  beyond that you hear of people
>>describing a tune as having a "dark" color but that has more to do
>>with mood than what's you're describing.

>  Yes. Minor keys, as we all know, tend to melancholy. E-flat minor can
>be particularly dark. I think of one of my favorite peices in all the
>world-- the extravigantly romantic 0p. 39 Rachmaninoff E-flat minor
>etude tableau (no. 5) which is as dark as the inside of an old deserted
>mansion at night full of antique furniture.  Demands to be played on an
>old grand with a candelabra.....

>   However, there's another shorter and earlier E-flat minor etude
>which fairly dances, and I think really is a bit "silvery" (at least as
>played by a professional). There's just the undercurrent of melancholy
>in it, all but lost.  Of course there's more to mood in music than key.

I meant E-flat major.  And many of the past composers have mentioned
their own ideas for what colors the different musical keys are, so
this isn't something I invented.  And, of course, the colors each
person perceives will be entirely different.  Those who read music
will think of E-flat minor as being dark because of all the flats in
the key signature which tend to darken the musical score, or other
keys will have particular meaning because of an association with a
place or time.  I don't believe there is any fundamental color to each
key that everyone should perceive.


Wed, 01 Jan 2003 03:00:00 GMT
 Terminology help required.


Quote:
>  Synesthesia or synaesthesia.  It's actually pretty common, if you
>count all those people who think that certain numerals should have a
>natural color, and who see them that way (blue 7's, etc).  Feynman and
>a lot of great physicists and mathematicians have been that way.

Yeah. Another, at least, synethesia-like phenomenon occurs on the edge
of sleep and I'm guessing that it's not uncommon: as I'm drifting off
into sleep, a low-level but sharp noise (the creak of wood, the
expansion of a hot water pipe - any sudden little sound) will provoke
raster-like images in my visual field. They may resemble a checker
board or a patterned array of luminous points of light. It's very
short-lived and is undoubtedly provoked by the small noise.

Al



Wed, 01 Jan 2003 03:00:00 GMT
 Terminology help required.



Quote:
>   Yes. Minor keys, as we all know, tend to melancholy.
E-flat minor can
> be particularly dark. I think of one of my favorite
peices in all the
> world-- the extravigantly romantic 0p. 39 Rachmaninoff
E-flat minor
> etude tableau (no. 5) which is as dark as the inside of
an old deserted
> mansion at night full of antique furniture.  Demands to
be played on an
> old grand with a candelabra.....

>    However, there's another shorter and earlier E-flat
minor etude
> which fairly dances, and I think really is a bit

"silvery" (at least as
Quote:
> played by a professional). There's just the undercurrent
of melancholy
> in it, all but lost.  Of course there's more to mood in

music than key.


Wed, 01 Jan 2003 03:00:00 GMT
 Terminology help required.

Quote:

> I meant E-flat major.  And many of the past composers have mentioned
> their own ideas for what colors the different musical keys are, so
> this isn't something I invented.  

yeah, but the point of this thread was an inquiry into some sort of
neurological multisensory thing.  the thing that you're describing is
typical artsy-fartsy stuff where musicians come up with this stuff in
an attempt to effect (or should i say, affect) some notion of
creativity.

--
  __  ______  __  / __/ |
_/ (_(_) / (_(_/_/_(_/  .
be optimistic!  you can win,
as long as you keep, your head to the sky
                        -the sounds of blackness



Wed, 01 Jan 2003 03:00:00 GMT
 Terminology help required.

Quote:


>> I meant E-flat major.  And many of the past composers have mentioned
>> their own ideas for what colors the different musical keys are, so
>> this isn't something I invented.  

>yeah, but the point of this thread was an inquiry into some sort of
>neurological multisensory thing.  the thing that you're describing is
>typical artsy-fartsy stuff where musicians come up with this stuff in
>an attempt to effect (or should i say, affect) some notion of
>creativity.

No, what I'm describing is akin to what Dr. Harris did regarding the
colors of numerals, as he was saying the phenomenon would be quite
common if you include those vague sensations.  I never claimed that
the colors of numerals or musical keys is an example of synesthesia.

Your nonsensical claim, in an attempt to insult me, that musicians
"come up with this stuff" to feign creativity shows you obviously have
no real musical ability of your own.  I never "came up" with colors of
musical keys for any reason.  I simply noticed them.  People with
perfect pitch (ability to recognize the pitch of musical tones) often
describe that they hear the color of the tone and that's how they
recognize them.  J.S. Bach noticed colors of musical keys.  If you
think he wasn't creative then you obviously never got past the lesson
on how to find middle C.



Thu, 02 Jan 2003 03:00:00 GMT
 Terminology help required.


Quote:

> I never "came up" with colors of
>musical keys for any reason.  I simply noticed them.  People with
>perfect pitch (ability to recognize the pitch of musical tones) often
>describe that they hear the color of the tone and that's how they
>recognize them.

FWIW when I compose/hear music I "feel/see" them as shapes.  The richer the
tone and harmonies, the more 3D the shape.  If a single note is a line, two
become a plane, a 3-note chord is a tangible object, and anything above that
is "scrunchy".  I can't think of any other word to describe it :o)  Based on
that principle, can you imagine what I'm experiencing with something like
"Zadoc the Priest"?

The "feeling" bit isn't an actual tactile sensation, just an overall sort of
.... awareness of the shape.

I think Heinlein had it right when he invented the word "Grok".  When I hear
a piece of music I like, I grok it :o)

"'Grok' means to understand so thoroughly that the observer becomes a part
of the observed - to merge, blend, intermarry, lose identity in group
experience. It means almost everything that we mean by religion, philosophy,
and science - and it means as little to us [because we are from Earth] as
color means to a blind man. "

Heinlein: "Stranger in a Strange Land".

Bennett



Thu, 02 Jan 2003 03:00:00 GMT
 Terminology help required.


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Terminology help required.



Quote:
>   Yes. Minor keys, as we all know, tend to melancholy.
> E-flat minor can be particularly dark. I think of one of
> my favorite peices in all the world-- the extravigantly
> romantic 0p. 39 Rachmaninoff E-flat minor etude tableau
> (no. 5) which is as dark as the inside of an old deserted
> mansion at night full of antique furniture.  Demands to
> be played on an old grand with a candelabra.....

>    However, there's another shorter and earlier E-flat
> minor etude which fairly dances, and I think really is a
> bit "silvery" (at least as played by a professional).
> There's just the undercurrent of melancholy in it, all
> but lost.  Of course there's more to mood in music than
> key.

So what key would Floyd Kramer's "Last Date" and Ramsey
Lewis' "The In Crowd" be?


Thu, 02 Jan 2003 03:00:00 GMT
 Terminology help required.


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 
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