South asian heart attack gene identified 
Author Message
 South asian heart attack gene identified

Gene leading to early heart attacks identified

KALPANA JAIN

THE TIMES OF INDIA NEWS SERVICE

EW DELHI: In a major breakthrough, researchers have identified a
genetic variation which may be influencing the deposit of cholesterol
on the walls of arteries and leading to early heart attacks amongst
Indians.

For quite sometime it has been known that Asians tend to have a higher
susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases and research has been going
on to identify reasons for it. Several explanations have been offered
so far. This latest breakthrough will answer some of the questions on
early heart attacks among young Indians.

Identified by a group of medical researchers at the All India
Institute of Medical Sciences, the genetic variation will also go on
to explain why only some people develop heart disease whereas some
others, with all the predisposing factors, do not.

Experts say the other predisposing factors do play a role in
increasing the susceptibility of a person. For instance, if the risk
of developing heart disease goes up by four times due to the genetic
variant, it may be eight times more if the person has high {*filter*}
pressure as well, says one of the researchers leading the team, Dr
Anoop Misra.

Therefore, a person detected with this genetic variation would need to
find out about other risk factors, such as the {*filter*} pressure, to know
his vulnerability. And till such time as gene therapy starts offering
solutions, the risks can be minimised only through a strict adherence
to a healthy lifestyle: no smoking, regular exercise and a diet with
minimum fat, he said.

The variation has been detected on a gene, known as Apolipoprotein E,
which helps in carrying cholesterol proteins from one place to another
in the body. Those who develop heart disease at an early age have been
found to have a variant in this gene, known as E4. Majority of Indians
do not have this.

Detected through the help of gene sequencing, the variant was located
in those who suffered a heart attack at an early age. This e{*filter*}d
group of researchers said the findings were significant and would open
up areas of future work. AIIMS cardiology professor V K Behl, who led
another team of researchers, said Indians are known to have an
increased risk to heart disease. "The findings take us one step
forward." However, he cautioned that heart disease may involve several
risk factors and it must be remembered that one factor will never be
entirely responsible.

The study was conducted in a group of 45 patients who developed
coronary heart disease before the age of 40. The patients were sex and
age matched with controls over a period of two years.

{*filter*} samples of all these people were taken, from which the DNA was
separated and studied for its genetic content. These 45 patients had
higher abdominal obesity as well as high content of fat in their
{*filter*}. The researchers found that the gene apolipoprotein E4 was
present in most of those who suffered a heart attack compared to only
two in the control group.



Thu, 08 Jan 2004 00:14:11 GMT
 South asian heart attack gene identified
If true, the life insurance companies will be the first to try and get
their hands on {*filter*} samples (by hook or more likely by crook) of their
customers for screening.  Rates will go up for Indians and go down for
everyone else.
Quote:

> Gene leading to early heart attacks identified

> KALPANA JAIN

> THE TIMES OF INDIA NEWS SERVICE

> EW DELHI: In a major breakthrough, researchers have identified a
> genetic variation which may be influencing the deposit of cholesterol
> on the walls of arteries and leading to early heart attacks amongst
> Indians.

> For quite sometime it has been known that Asians tend to have a higher
> susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases and research has been going
> on to identify reasons for it. Several explanations have been offered
> so far. This latest breakthrough will answer some of the questions on
> early heart attacks among young Indians.

> Identified by a group of medical researchers at the All India
> Institute of Medical Sciences, the genetic variation will also go on
> to explain why only some people develop heart disease whereas some
> others, with all the predisposing factors, do not.

> Experts say the other predisposing factors do play a role in
> increasing the susceptibility of a person. For instance, if the risk
> of developing heart disease goes up by four times due to the genetic
> variant, it may be eight times more if the person has high {*filter*}
> pressure as well, says one of the researchers leading the team, Dr
> Anoop Misra.

> Therefore, a person detected with this genetic variation would need to
> find out about other risk factors, such as the {*filter*} pressure, to know
> his vulnerability. And till such time as gene therapy starts offering
> solutions, the risks can be minimised only through a strict adherence
> to a healthy lifestyle: no smoking, regular exercise and a diet with
> minimum fat, he said.

> The variation has been detected on a gene, known as Apolipoprotein E,
> which helps in carrying cholesterol proteins from one place to another
> in the body. Those who develop heart disease at an early age have been
> found to have a variant in this gene, known as E4. Majority of Indians
> do not have this.

> Detected through the help of gene sequencing, the variant was located
> in those who suffered a heart attack at an early age. This e{*filter*}d
> group of researchers said the findings were significant and would open
> up areas of future work. AIIMS cardiology professor V K Behl, who led
> another team of researchers, said Indians are known to have an
> increased risk to heart disease. "The findings take us one step
> forward." However, he cautioned that heart disease may involve several
> risk factors and it must be remembered that one factor will never be
> entirely responsible.

> The study was conducted in a group of 45 patients who developed
> coronary heart disease before the age of 40. The patients were sex and
> age matched with controls over a period of two years.

> {*filter*} samples of all these people were taken, from which the DNA was
> separated and studied for its genetic content. These 45 patients had
> higher abdominal obesity as well as high content of fat in their
> {*filter*}. The researchers found that the gene apolipoprotein E4 was
> present in most of those who suffered a heart attack compared to only
> two in the control group.



Wed, 07 Jan 2004 16:30:48 GMT
 
 [ 2 post ] 

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