Pau D'arco or Taheebo query 
Author Message
 Pau D'arco or Taheebo query

Does anyone know anything about this herb?

Any information or discussion is welcome.
--
Robert J. Kelley
Mentor Graphics Corporation



Mon, 19 Apr 1993 19:37:00 GMT
 Pau D'arco or Taheebo query

The basis for folks believing that this herb will help heal Candida
overgrowths is that it is the bark of a tree that grows in the Amazonian
rain forests without ever succumbing to any of the funguses that usually
attack both living and dead wood in such a wet environment.

There are many useful medicines which have been "discovered" by
noticing their effects in this way; however, to my knowledge, nobody
has ever done any controlled studies proving Pau D'arco's
effectiveness.  On the plus side, I've never heard of any serious or
irreversible problems arising from drinking the stuff, so it's worth a
try to see if it helps you (or whoever has the problem that you're
posting for).

When I was first diagnosed with Candida problems, I tried the
nutritional treatment route - rigorous low-carbo non-yeast diet,
lots of garlic supplements, and quarts of Pau d'arco tea every day.
It caused headaches and a "toxic feeling" which the chiropractor claimed
was due to the rapid kill-off of the candida and subsequent release of
the toxins in the lysed candida cells into the {*filter*}stream.  I really
had no idea whether that was correct, or if the headaches were directly
caused by the tea.  By decreasing the dosage and then working back up
to the full amount gradually, I was able to handle it.

I got enough relief that I was ok for a couple of years.  The second
time the Candida got out of hand, I wasn't able to force myself to stay
on the rigorous diet; the Pau d'arco tea by itself was *NOT* sufficient
to do any good.  I ended up going to an MD who prescribed Nystatin
(pure powder, taken orally in water 4x/day) along with a less rigorous
version of the diet.  The Nystatin produced some of the same side
effects (headaches and "toxic feeling") that the Pau d'arco had, which
would support the idea that the effects were a result of the kill-off
of the yeast.

My conclusion after several bouts:  Nystatin has it all over Pau d'arco
when it comes to knocking the yeast levels back to a normal level, and
you don't have to be as ascetic about the diet.  Of course, the more
disciplined you can be about avoiding sugar during either treatment, the
faster the Candida problem disappears.  For self-help when I start
noticing the first symptoms of overgrowth, I've found that a new
garlic preparation called Garlicin (Nature's Way) is effective.

Hope this helps...

Andrea Frankel, Hewlett-Packard (San Diego Division) (619) 592-4664
                "...like a song that's born to soar the sky"
______________________________________________________________________________
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USnail   : 16399 W. Bernardo Drive, San Diego CA 9nd ibout
bout



Mon, 19 Apr 1993 22:58:00 GMT
 Pau D'arco or Taheebo query


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Pau D'arco or Taheebo query

Quote:
>When I was first diagnosed with Candida problems, I tried the
>nutritional treatment route - rigorous low-carbo non-yeast diet...

I've often heard talk about 'non-yeast' diets, and even saw
a book in a bookstore that advocated staying away from yeast.
My response has been to giggle that Candida (the infection-causing
yeast) and Saccharomyces (includes baker's yeast and brewer's yeast)
are very different beasts.

But often when I have this response it's merely because I'm
uninformed. Why should one expect that a Saccharomyces-free
diet should help a Candida infection?

- Sean Eddy
- MCD Biology; U. of Colorado at Boulder; Boulder CO 80309



Mon, 19 Apr 1993 10:30:00 GMT
 Pau D'arco or Taheebo query

Quote:

>I've often heard talk about 'non-yeast' diets, and even saw
>a book in a bookstore that advocated staying away from yeast.
>My response has been to giggle that Candida (the infection-causing
>yeast) and Saccharomyces (includes baker's yeast and brewer's yeast)
>are very different beasts.

>But often when I have this response it's merely because I'm
>uninformed. Why should one expect that a Saccharomyces-free
>diet should help a Candida infection?

Regardless of what the books say, I think that the most important
aspect of these diets is actually the extremely low carbohydrate/no
simple sugars part (since Candida thrives when sugar levels go up -
some of us figured out long ago that cutting back on desserts helped
avoid recurrent {*filter*}l yeast infections).  Avoiding other forms of
yeast is secondary, although avoiding baked goods would obviously cut
out alot of sugar in the diet!

In fact, I found absolutely no ill effects from baker's yeast, or from
whatever it is that is used to ferment vinegar, soy sauce, or miso.  I
do have problems with brewer's yeast, natto, and mushrooms.  Blue
cheese and brie are ok, camembert gives me problems.  Since the
distinctions are pretty specific, my conjecture is that the effects are
attributable to sensitivities to the specific metabolic byproducts or
characteristic proteins of these flora and fauna, since all cooking.net">food
sensitivities (as well as reactivity to solvent fumes, perfumes, smoke,
etc.) seem to be exacerbated during a Candida uprising.

Andrea Frankel, Hewlett-Packard (San Diego Division) (619) 592-4664
                "...like a song that's born to soar the sky"
______________________________________________________________________________
UUCP     : ...hplabs!hp-sdd!andrea from
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           or ...hp-sdd!andrea from {hp-pcd|hpfcla|hpda|noscvax|gould9|sdcsvax}


USnail   : 16399 W. Bernardo Drive, San Diego CA 92127-1899 USA



Mon, 19 Apr 1993 18:34:00 GMT
 Pau D'arco or Taheebo query

Quote:
>>I've often heard talk about 'non-yeast' diets, and even saw
>>a book in a bookstore that advocated staying away from yeast.
>>My response has been to giggle that Candida (the infection-causing

I have a friend who suffered from seemingly chronic yeast infections.
After cutting out sugar, trying prescription pills and creams,
eating tons of active-culture yogurt, etc., maintaining immaculate
personal hygiene, etc., she was put on a yeast-free diet.
It was the only thing that seemed to relieve her condition.  Now
she continued with other treatments, so it may be the total
combination that worked, but it was not until she cut yeast products
from her diet that she felt better.

-- AMB



Wed, 19 May 1993 14:30:00 GMT
 Pau D'arco or Taheebo query


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Pau D'arco or Taheebo query
Quote:

>Does anyone know anything about this herb?

I've been working with candida for several years, and gotten to know
its ins and outs pretty well, including the vagaries of yeast die-off,
which is pretty much a prerequisite for healing for most people
with candida (I counsel people about it professionally
now). I used taheebo for quite a while because everyone said it was
a good thing to do, along with my nystatin program. But the taheebo
was expensive and a pain to cook up, so I gradually slacked off
with it. My present view is that nystatin (as Andrea Frankel said)
has it all over taheebo, probably partly because nystatin is a refined,
concentrated product (though it's originally of natural origin too)
whereas with taheebo you're dealing with the raw, unrefined plant
which has the active ingredient (whatever it is) in much diluted
form.

HOWEVER. Andrea Frankel mentioned pure nystatin powder. I used that
for a while--then my new MD switched me to enteric-coated nystatin
tabs. Did I ever go through die-off all over again!! The powder hadn't been
getting to my gut at all, which is where most of the candida
is, according to my MD's research info. Instead it had been wasted,
since the stomach digests a lot of it. I've really zoomed in
improvement since switching to the new form.

In addition, I can't stress enough how important sticking to a
low-carb, low-mold diet is for getting well. The clients I've had
who've told themselves otherwise have eventually decided they
were fooling themselves (or else they didn't improve). Often other
changes are necessary too, depending on the person's allergic sensitivities.
My opinion is that the popular books available about candida
(The Yeast Connection, etc) are not realistic in their dietary
recommendations--perhaps they are afraid of scaring off potential
book-buyers.

-----------
Kevin McLoughlin                                Physics Board

UUCP: ...ucbvax!ucscc!chromo.kevin              Santa Cruz, CA 95064
408-429-2258



Wed, 19 May 1993 22:04:00 GMT
 Pau D'arco or Taheebo query


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Pau D'arco or Taheebo query

Quote:

>My response has been to giggle that Candida (the infection-causing
>yeast) and Saccharomyces (includes baker's yeast and brewer's yeast)
>are very different beasts.
>But often when I have this response it's merely because I'm
>uninformed. Why should one expect that a Saccharomyces-free
>diet should help a Candida infection?

Because people who have candidiasis generally experience allergic
cross-reactions to other molds and yeasts, which include not
only environmental molds (the ones in your dirty sink) but those
used in cooking.net">food for fermentation, for making bread, {*filter*}ic beverages,
tempeh, miso, tamari, amasake, vinegar, and those that tend to
be found invisibly on the surfaces of nuts, whole grains, tofu, fruit,
all of which are often problems for mold-allergic people.
-----------
Kevin McLoughlin                                Physics Board

UUCP: ...ucbvax!ucscc!chromo.kevin              Santa Cruz, CA 95064
408-429-2258


Wed, 19 May 1993 22:11:00 GMT
 Pau D'arco or Taheebo query


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Pau D'arco or Taheebo query

All this talk about candida infections raises what must be a really
naive question in my mind.  The answer is inportant to me cause my
wife has a really long-term {*filter*}l candida infection that is driving
us both nuts.

Some of these candida-related postings seem to be talking about candida
in the intestine and on the skin and so on.  Could someone explain the
relationship between these types of full-body infections and plain old
long-term {*filter*}l candida.  Is {*filter*}l candida perhaps a symptom of a
more widespread infection?  What are the differences in the therapy
appropriate to the two types of infections.  Etc.

Thanks in advance. -- TomA



Wed, 19 May 1993 14:53:00 GMT
 Pau D'arco or Taheebo query

Quote:

> Some of these candida-related postings seem to be talking about candida
> in the intestine and on the skin and so on.  Could someone explain the
> relationship between these types of full-body infections and plain old
> long-term {*filter*}l candida.  Is {*filter*}l candida perhaps a symptom of a
> more widespread infection?  What are the differences in the therapy
> appropriate to the two types of infections.  Etc.

It helps if you remember a couple of things.  First, most of the recent
postings on candida in sci.med have been positioned well outside the
traditional medical understanding of infection.  In those articles, candida has
been responsible for all sorts of poorly defined, diffuse ills.  You can
believe them or not, but you'd be hard pressed to find any support from the
medical mainstream.

Candida is one of the normal fauna in people, and most candida infections
are "topical", proliferating in areas where they might usually reside,
but for some reason are no longer being kept in check by the body's defenses.
This would include oral, {*filter*}l and esophageal "thrush", as well as some
cases of intestinal overgrowth.  Another localized infection is candidiasis
of the bladder, usually due to an indwelling catheter.  Now, these types of
candida infection, while of varying degrees of seriousness and deserving of
treatment, are localized and usually stay that way in an otherwise healthy
person.  In fact, the primary treatments (nystatin and perhaps amphotericin B,
clotrimazole and miconazole) are used as non-absorbed topical antifungal agents.
That is, you have to bathe the area (mouth, throat, esophagus, {*filter*}, etc.)
with the {*filter*}, which work locally and not systemically.  Nystatin, the most
popular drug, is not absorbed at all when administered orally or topically,
which is a good thing, because this almost benign drug is fiercely toxic
when administered parenterally.

Recurrent topical infections generally suggest that there's something strange
going on, although your doctor would really want to do a history and a workup
to begin to discover why.  Occasionally it's due to a degree of immune system
impairment, such as in uncontrolled diabetes or AIDS (however, I wouldn't
worry about something like AIDS when we're discussing a woman who is prone
to {*filter*}l candidiasis but is otherwise healthy.)  At other times, it's due
to the administration of {*filter*} which influence the environment where candida is
found; I'm referring to the effects of birth control pills in some women
and (more rarely) the effects of antibiotic administration.  This last item
has been overemphasized in the popular literature; the overwhelming majority
of people given antibacterial antibiotics do not have any problem with
candida overgrowth.  Also, it can be an issue of hygiene; pantyhose
trap heat and moisture which can facilitate the overgrowth of candida
in the {*filter*}.

True disseminated candidiasis is a particularly {*filter*} state of affairs,
and is usually seen only in severely immune-compromised patients, such
as those with AIDS, leukemia, or bone-marrow transplants.  It requires
the administration of systemic antifungal agents, most of which are very
toxic, such as amphotericin B, flucytosine, and ketoconazole.  I wouldn't
worry about having it; that is, if you can be sitting up and wondering
about it, you probably don't.
--
Steve Dyer




Wed, 19 May 1993 21:18:00 GMT
 Pau D'arco or Taheebo query

In reference to chronic {*filter*}l yeast infections: I have heard that
this can be an indicator of a (pre-)diabetic condition.  It would be
wise to have the necessary {*filter*}/urine/whatever tests to check this out.
Marginal conditions (of diabetes) that flare up only when diet or
exercise regimens change can cause recurring flare-ups of yeast
problems.  One acquaintance discovered a diabetic condition this
way, thanks to an alert doctor.

As Steve Dyer noted, birth control pills may make some women especially
susceptible to such overgrowths, but don't let your doctor dismiss it
as simply that (or pantyhose or whatever) without checking other
possibilities.
--
Gene Spafford
Dept. of Computer Sciences, Purdue University, W. Lafayette IN 47907-2004



Wed, 19 May 1993 23:16:00 GMT
 
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