Risks of General Anesthesia 
Author Message
 Risks of General Anesthesia


Quote:

> My first son had severe vomiting after general anesthesia for
> his tonsillectomy, which opened up his incisions causing
> severe bleeding. My second son is about to undergo the same
> operation and we have expressed our concern about vomiting to
> his ENT. He said they would give him {*filter*} which would minimize
> the chances of the same happening, if that was what we wanted.
> Is there any downside to them giving him these {*filter*}, versus
> just ignoring what happened to my first son and hoping it doesn't
> happen again?.

Well, every drug has some side effects, but the typical {*filter*} we use for
prevention of nausea and vomiting have (at least in {*filter*}s, with which I
am more familiar) very low rates of significant side effects.  If I were
to have an anesthetic myself, I would request that one or the other of
these {*filter*} which are known to be efficacious in many (but not all)
patients be used for me.  I don't like to throw up.

DG

--

Assoc. Prof. of Anesthesiology            415 858 3938
Stanford Univ. School of Medicine
***(This posting is my own opinion and does not reflect that of my employer.  It is for information only and does not constitute the practice of medicine ******



Wed, 06 Aug 1997 03:03:54 GMT
 Risks of General Anesthesia

Quote:

> My first son had severe vomiting after general anesthesia for
> his tonsillectomy, which opened up his incisions causing
> severe bleeding. My second son is about to undergo the same
> operation and we have expressed our concern about vomiting to
> his ENT. He said they would give him {*filter*} which would minimize
> the chances of the same happening, if that was what we wanted.
> Is there any downside to them giving him these {*filter*}, versus
> just ignoring what happened to my first son and hoping it doesn't
> happen again?.

1.  Nausea and vomiting after tonsillectomy is a very common occurence,
and can be caused by the stimulation of the oropharynx due to the surgery
as much as the anesthetic agents.  It is very difficult to prevent, even
with the anti-nausea medications we now have available.
2.  The anti nausea medications we have available have few side effects
(ondansetron, the latest in the armamentarium, has minimal side effects
other than its cost: about $20 a dose).  
3.  I would agree with the plan of giving him the medications, although I
would not hold out too much assurance that it will not happen again.  
4.  A discussion with your son's nurse anesthetist or anesthesiologist
prior to his surgery would perhaps allay some of your concerns.  Surgeons
are notorious for forgetting to pass this information on!
5.  A plan for you to avoid this becoming too much of a problem for your
second child:  
Encourage clear fluids (Gatorade is good because it has electrolytes to
replace those lost from vomiting)
If he is hungry, try small amounts at first
remember, a person can go for quite a while without eating, but not so
long without fluids.

Good luck!
Dan Simonson CRNA (Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist)

--
Dan Simonson



Wed, 06 Aug 1997 23:12:56 GMT
 
 [ 2 post ] 

 Relevant Pages 

1. Risks of General Anesthesia

2. Risks of General Anesthesia

3. Info needed -- risks on general anesthesia for coma survivors

4. Long term effects from general anesthesia?

5. Long term effects from general anesthesia?

6. General Anesthesia ( for tonsillectomy )

7. Auditory Perception/Awareness under General Anesthesia

8. General anesthesia

9. Herniated belly and general anesthesia

10. Regional vs. General Anesthesia

11. General Anesthesia & Epilepsy

12. Phobia of General Anesthesia?


 
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software