Dentist uses Nitrous Oxide? 
Author Message
 Dentist uses Nitrous Oxide?

Quote:

> My four year old finally, FINALLY got his dentist visit today, four months
> after an x-ray showed a startling five cavities.  Our dentist promptly
> referred us to a pediatric dentist, saying she wasn't set up to do that
> much work on a small kid.  The pediatric dentist fit us in for an initial
> exam and a teeth cleaning, but couldn't get us an appointment to treat him
> until today.

> Things started out fine, everyone was cheerful and no one was scared or
> anxious.  He got in the chair and was laughing and fine.  But five minutes
> into the nitrous oxide he suddenly started whimpering and curling up and
> got clingy and weepy and scared.  I wasn't able to figure out what was
> causing the anxiety - I really think it was a reaction to the nitrous
> oxide.  The dentist just thought I had a wimpy boy that I babied - which
> wouldn't be a crime if I did, but that doesn't happen to be the case.

> The damn dentist threw us out.  So much for pediatric dentists knowing
> how to work with kids!  He offered no solution beyond we'll try again on
> Monday.  Meanwhile, this dentist is a 45 minute drive from my home, he
> isn't a preferred provider in my insurance plan and he thinks I've caused
> my son's mouth problems through neglect (which just isn't true.)

> The pediatric dentist was talking about scheduling an OR for sometime in
> the winter (months and months from now) to do all four fillings at
> once.  I'm disinclined to put my kid through general anasthesia
> again.  (Long story, but probably related to why he has such weirdly
> horrible teeth: he had a traumatic illness and hospitalization 15 months
> ago.)

> I'm thinking of finding a dentist that does NOT use nitrous oxide but who
> will prescribe a valium before the visit.  What do you think?

> -- Wendy

Sorry but I think your child may be spoiled and knows how
to get your attention and avoid situations he doesn't
enjoy. While he may have been anxious, you could have
helped more than you did. Nitrous didn't have anything
to do with this incident.

-Karen



Tue, 28 Feb 2006 11:56:27 GMT
 Dentist uses Nitrous Oxide?

Quote:
Karen DeMent writes:
> Sorry but I think your child may be spoiled and knows how
> to get your attention and avoid situations he doesn't
> enjoy. While he may have been anxious, you could have
> helped more than you did. Nitrous didn't have anything
> to do with this incident.

Agreed.  These are not the effects of nitrous oxide.  And Valium would
be a step in the wrong direction.

--
Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.



Tue, 28 Feb 2006 13:18:14 GMT
 Dentist uses Nitrous Oxide?

Quote:

(snip)
> > The damn dentist threw us out.  So much for pediatric dentists knowing
> > how to work with kids!  He offered no solution beyond we'll try again on
> > Monday.  Meanwhile, this dentist is a 45 minute drive from my home, he
> > isn't a preferred provider in my insurance plan and he thinks I've
caused
> > my son's mouth problems through neglect (which just isn't true.)

> > The pediatric dentist was talking about scheduling an OR for sometime in
> > the winter (months and months from now) to do all four fillings at
> > once.  I'm disinclined to put my kid through general anasthesia
> > again.  (Long story, but probably related to why he has such weirdly
> > horrible teeth: he had a traumatic illness and hospitalization 15 months
> > ago.)

> > I'm thinking of finding a dentist that does NOT use nitrous oxide but
who
> > will prescribe a valium before the visit.  What do you think?

> > -- Wendy

Hello Wendy,
I think you should look for another pediatric dentist and that you should
carefully check his/her credentials.  He/she should have a degree in
pediatric dentistry and be board certified.  Be aware that sometimes
dentists limit their practices to certain types of dentistry without
actually being board certified in that specialty.
Hope this helps.


Tue, 28 Feb 2006 17:53:29 GMT
 Dentist uses Nitrous Oxide?


Quote:

>> My four year old finally, FINALLY got his dentist visit today, four months
>> after an x-ray showed a startling five cavities.  

Ouch, jujube {*filter*}?

Quote:
>Our dentist promptly
>> referred us to a pediatric dentist, saying she wasn't set up to do that
>> much work on a small kid.

Yup.

Quote:
> The pediatric dentist fit us in for an initial
>> exam and a teeth cleaning, but couldn't get us an appointment to treat him
>> until today.

>> Things started out fine, everyone was cheerful and no one was scared or
>> anxious.

Not even the dentist ......

Quote:
> He got in the chair and was laughing and fine.  But five minutes
>> into the nitrous oxide he suddenly started whimpering and curling up and
>> got clingy and weepy and scared.  I wasn't able to figure out what was
>> causing the anxiety - I really think it was a reaction to the nitrous
>> oxide.

Yes.

Quote:
> The dentist just thought I had a wimpy boy that I babied - which
>> wouldn't be a crime if I did, but that doesn't happen to be the case.

So the doc is an amateur psychologist?

Quote:
>> The damn dentist threw us out.

Wow!

Quote:
> So much for pediatric dentists knowing
>> how to work with kids!  He offered no solution beyond we'll try again on
>> Monday.  Meanwhile, this dentist is a 45 minute drive from my home, he
>> isn't a preferred provider in my insurance plan and he thinks I've caused
>> my son's mouth problems through neglect (which just isn't true.)

Insurance gumming up the works again .....

Quote:
>> The pediatric dentist was talking about scheduling an OR for sometime in
>> the winter (months and months from now) to do all four fillings at
>> once.

NO WAY! CEASE and DESIST now!

Quote:
> I'm disinclined to put my kid through general anasthesia
>> again.  (Long story, but probably related to why he has such weirdly
>> horrible teeth: he had a traumatic illness and hospitalization 15 months
>> ago.)

Want to see some interesting court cases?

Quote:

>> I'm thinking of finding a dentist that does NOT use nitrous oxide but who
>> will prescribe a valium before the visit.  What do you think?

Yup, or in the bad old days we slipped the kid a Mickey Finn. That was
chl{*filter*}hydrate ~ today we have much better!

Joel

Quote:
>> -- Wendy

>Sorry but I think your child may be spoiled and knows how
>to get your attention and avoid situations he doesn't
>enjoy. While he may have been anxious, you could have
>helped more than you did. Nitrous didn't have anything
>to do with this incident.

WHERE did this part come from???

Quote:

>-Karen

--
Joel M. Eichen, .
Philadelphia PA

STANDARD DISCLAIMER applies:
<You fill it in>



Tue, 28 Feb 2006 20:46:19 GMT
 Dentist uses Nitrous Oxide?
Karen, you be NOT a psychologist .... or are you? For God sakes, when
will parents stop and listen to the doctors?

Joel M. Eichen DDS



Quote:
>Karen DeMent writes:

>> Sorry but I think your child may be spoiled and knows how
>> to get your attention and avoid situations he doesn't
>> enjoy. While he may have been anxious, you could have
>> helped more than you did. Nitrous didn't have anything
>> to do with this incident.

>Agreed.  These are not the effects of nitrous oxide.  And Valium would
>be a step in the wrong direction.

--
Joel M. Eichen, .
Philadelphia PA

STANDARD DISCLAIMER applies:
<You fill it in>



Tue, 28 Feb 2006 20:47:25 GMT
 Dentist uses Nitrous Oxide?
Good advice Marian, Thanks!

Joel

*****
On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 09:53:29 GMT, "garden_state"

Quote:


>(snip)
>> > The damn dentist threw us out.  So much for pediatric dentists knowing
>> > how to work with kids!  He offered no solution beyond we'll try again on
>> > Monday.  Meanwhile, this dentist is a 45 minute drive from my home, he
>> > isn't a preferred provider in my insurance plan and he thinks I've
>caused
>> > my son's mouth problems through neglect (which just isn't true.)

>> > The pediatric dentist was talking about scheduling an OR for sometime in
>> > the winter (months and months from now) to do all four fillings at
>> > once.  I'm disinclined to put my kid through general anasthesia
>> > again.  (Long story, but probably related to why he has such weirdly
>> > horrible teeth: he had a traumatic illness and hospitalization 15 months
>> > ago.)

>> > I'm thinking of finding a dentist that does NOT use nitrous oxide but
>who
>> > will prescribe a valium before the visit.  What do you think?

>> > -- Wendy

>Hello Wendy,
>I think you should look for another pediatric dentist and that you should
>carefully check his/her credentials.  He/she should have a degree in
>pediatric dentistry and be board certified.  Be aware that sometimes
>dentists limit their practices to certain types of dentistry without
>actually being board certified in that specialty.
>Hope this helps.

--
Joel M. Eichen, .
Philadelphia PA

STANDARD DISCLAIMER applies:
<You fill it in>



Tue, 28 Feb 2006 20:48:23 GMT
 Dentist uses Nitrous Oxide?

Quote:
> Karen DeMent writes:
>> Sorry but I think your child may be spoiled and knows how
>> to get your attention and avoid situations he doesn't
>> enjoy.

You may be right about him being "spoiled" if your definition is that he
knows how to get my attention and avoid situations he doesn't enjoy.

Quote:
>> While he may have been anxious, you could have
>> helped more than you did. Nitrous didn't have anything
>> to do with this incident.
> Agreed.  These are not the effects of nitrous oxide.  

That's certainly the dentist's opinion and I'm glad to hear you say this,
since it makes him out to be more of a reasonable person if SOME people
agree with him.  And I don't have to feel so guilty for for having trusted
the guy to start with if he isn't just an outright charletan.

Quote:
> And Valium would be a step in the wrong direction.

Why?  What is a step in the right direction?  My goal here isn't to report
the dentist or feel righteous indignition or champion how wonderful a
parent I am, my goal here is to get my son's teeth treated.  What do you
suggest?

Wendy



Tue, 28 Feb 2006 21:22:57 GMT
 Dentist uses Nitrous Oxide?
He could be a very intelligent kid ,,, after all who LIKES the
dentist?

Joel

On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 13:22:57 GMT, Wendy Marsden

Quote:


>> Karen DeMent writes:
>>> Sorry but I think your child may be spoiled and knows how
>>> to get your attention and avoid situations he doesn't
>>> enjoy.

>You may be right about him being "spoiled" if your definition is that he
>knows how to get my attention and avoid situations he doesn't enjoy.

>>> While he may have been anxious, you could have
>>> helped more than you did. Nitrous didn't have anything
>>> to do with this incident.

>> Agreed.  These are not the effects of nitrous oxide.  

>That's certainly the dentist's opinion and I'm glad to hear you say this,
>since it makes him out to be more of a reasonable person if SOME people
>agree with him.  And I don't have to feel so guilty for for having trusted
>the guy to start with if he isn't just an outright charletan.

>> And Valium would be a step in the wrong direction.

>Why?  What is a step in the right direction?  My goal here isn't to report
>the dentist or feel righteous indignition or champion how wonderful a
>parent I am, my goal here is to get my son's teeth treated.  What do you
>suggest?

>Wendy

--
Joel M. Eichen, .
Philadelphia PA

STANDARD DISCLAIMER applies:
<You fill it in>



Tue, 28 Feb 2006 21:19:31 GMT
 Dentist uses Nitrous Oxide?
The only cause for REPORTING is if he poisons people with amalgam ,,,
in that case the dentist may get jail time.

Ask Jan Drew.

Joel

**

On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 13:22:57 GMT, Wendy Marsden

Quote:


>> Karen DeMent writes:
>>> Sorry but I think your child may be spoiled and knows how
>>> to get your attention and avoid situations he doesn't
>>> enjoy.

>You may be right about him being "spoiled" if your definition is that he
>knows how to get my attention and avoid situations he doesn't enjoy.

>>> While he may have been anxious, you could have
>>> helped more than you did. Nitrous didn't have anything
>>> to do with this incident.

>> Agreed.  These are not the effects of nitrous oxide.  

>That's certainly the dentist's opinion and I'm glad to hear you say this,
>since it makes him out to be more of a reasonable person if SOME people
>agree with him.  And I don't have to feel so guilty for for having trusted
>the guy to start with if he isn't just an outright charletan.

>> And Valium would be a step in the wrong direction.

>Why?  What is a step in the right direction?  My goal here isn't to report
>the dentist or feel righteous indignition or champion how wonderful a
>parent I am, my goal here is to get my son's teeth treated.  What do you
>suggest?

>Wendy

--
Joel M. Eichen, .
Philadelphia PA

STANDARD DISCLAIMER applies:
<You fill it in>



Tue, 28 Feb 2006 21:20:51 GMT
 Dentist uses Nitrous Oxide?

Quote:
> >> I'm thinking of finding a dentist that does NOT use nitrous oxide but who
> >> will prescribe a valium before the visit.  What do you think?

> Yup, or in the bad old days we slipped the kid a Mickey Finn. That was
> chl{*filter*}hydrate ~ today we have much better!

We still used chl{*filter*}hydrate supps for restless kids in the early 90's.
I wouldn't use valium on small children but perhaps one of the valium
derivatives with less respir. depression. As a child I remember getting
NiOx at the dentist and it was great.
--
madiba


Tue, 28 Feb 2006 23:18:55 GMT
 Dentist uses Nitrous Oxide?

Quote:

> Sorry but I think your child may be spoiled

My aren't you the helpful one?  Any useful suggestions?

Quote:
> and knows how
> to get your attention and avoid situations he doesn't
> enjoy.

You just described all young children.  And {*filter*}s, for that matter.
We ALL seek to avoid situations we don't enjoy, and it's stupid for
{*filter*}s to assume children shouldn't do this or are spoiled if they do.
 How many children do *you* know sit quietly and smile and say "thank
you" when they are about to get an injection, or other possibly
unpleasant situations?

Quote:
> While he may have been anxious, you could have
> helped more than you did.

Suggestions please!  Sanctimonious finger pointing isn't helpful, and
merely makes you look judgemental and unhelpful.

Quote:
> Nitrous didn't have anything
> to do with this incident.

Whereas I agree that it's likely that the nitrous didn't have anything
to do with it, neither you nor I were there, and neither of us can
make this kind of diagnosis.

Next time, when someone asks for advice, give it. You didn't. You
merely criticized without providing suggestions.

Cathy Weeks
Mommy to Kivi Alexis 12/01



Tue, 28 Feb 2006 23:59:59 GMT
 Dentist uses Nitrous Oxide?

Quote:

> Karen DeMent writes:

> > Sorry but I think your child may be spoiled and knows how
> > to get your attention and avoid situations he doesn't
> > enjoy. While he may have been anxious, you could have
> > helped more than you did. Nitrous didn't have anything
> > to do with this incident.

> Agreed.  These are not the effects of nitrous oxide.  And Valium would
> be a step in the wrong direction.

Disagreed.  They MIGHT be (however unlikely) the effects in NO.  And
though I think avoiding {*filter*} when possible is a good idea, why is
Valium a bad idea?  If the child is truely scared, it could prevent
further fear.  I'm not sure it *is* the right choice (maybe is, maybe
isn't) but it's for her, and a competent pediatric dentist to decide.

As the daughter of dentists, and the wife of a man who has had a
life-long dental phobia due to horrible frightening experiences when
he was about the OP's son's age, I can say that trying to avoid a
dental phobia, especially when one looks about to start, is a really,
really good idea.

And a good pediatric dentist knows how to treat the little ones
without scaring them.

Cathy Weeks
Mommy to Kivi Alexis 12/01



Wed, 01 Mar 2006 00:03:45 GMT
 Dentist uses Nitrous Oxide?
Personally,,,,, (this has no reflection on the case being discussed),,,,,,
the kids I refer out and refuse to treat, is because of the parents every
time.  Difficult children (as regards to dental patients), are made that way
by their parents.  This does not take into account very young children, and
I think I remember the child being discussed as only being 4 yrs old.
Children this young needing extensive treatment often need to go the
hospital.  And, dental decay in children this small is the fault of the
parents EVERY time.  Children cannot be held responsible for their own
dental home care until 5-7 years of age.  Even at those ages, they HAVE to
be monitored every brushing session by a parent.  Then, we can discuss the
habits of many parent of putting kids to sleep with bottles (or the {*filter*}),
giving kids milk or drinks right before bed, various snacks, etc.

--
~+--~+--~+--~+--~+--
Stephen Mancuso, D.D.S.
Troy, Michigan, USA

{remove first 3 dots for email}
....................................................

This posting is intended for informational or conversational purposes only.
Always seek the opinion of a licensed dental professional before acting on
the advice or opinion expressed here.  Only a dentist who has examined you
in person can diagnose your problems and make decisions which will affect
your health.
......................
Please ignore j..d...
~~~~``````````#####----



Quote:
> > Karen DeMent writes:

> > > Sorry but I think your child may be spoiled and knows how
> > > to get your attention and avoid situations he doesn't
> > > enjoy. While he may have been anxious, you could have
> > > helped more than you did. Nitrous didn't have anything
> > > to do with this incident.

> > Agreed.  These are not the effects of nitrous oxide.  And Valium would
> > be a step in the wrong direction.

> Disagreed.  They MIGHT be (however unlikely) the effects in NO.  And
> though I think avoiding {*filter*} when possible is a good idea, why is
> Valium a bad idea?  If the child is truely scared, it could prevent
> further fear.  I'm not sure it *is* the right choice (maybe is, maybe
> isn't) but it's for her, and a competent pediatric dentist to decide.

> As the daughter of dentists, and the wife of a man who has had a
> life-long dental phobia due to horrible frightening experiences when
> he was about the OP's son's age, I can say that trying to avoid a
> dental phobia, especially when one looks about to start, is a really,
> really good idea.

> And a good pediatric dentist knows how to treat the little ones
> without scaring them.

> Cathy Weeks
> Mommy to Kivi Alexis 12/01



Wed, 01 Mar 2006 02:24:30 GMT
 Dentist uses Nitrous Oxide?


Quote:
> Personally,,,,, (this has no reflection on the case being discussed),,,,,,
> the kids I refer out and refuse to treat, is because of the parents every
> time.  Difficult children (as regards to dental patients), are made that way
> by their parents.  This does not take into account very young children, and
> I think I remember the child being discussed as only being 4 yrs old.
> Children this young needing extensive treatment often need to go the
> hospital.  And, dental decay in children this small is the fault of the
> parents EVERY time.  Children cannot be held responsible for their own
> dental home care until 5-7 years of age.  Even at those ages, they HAVE to
> be monitored every brushing session by a parent.  Then, we can discuss the
> habits of many parent of putting kids to sleep with bottles (or the {*filter*}),
> giving kids milk or drinks right before bed, various snacks, etc.

> --

I had understood that there were some medicines and some medical
conditions that could well result in having serious dental problems.  
That can't possibly be the parents' fault.

meh
--
Children won't care how much you know until they know how much you care



Wed, 01 Mar 2006 02:30:21 GMT
 Dentist uses Nitrous Oxide?
Those are associated with very sick children.

--
~+--~+--~+--~+--~+--
Stephen Mancuso, D.D.S.
Troy, Michigan, USA

{remove first 3 dots for email}
....................................................

This posting is intended for informational or conversational purposes only.
Always seek the opinion of a licensed dental professional before acting on
the advice or opinion expressed here.  Only a dentist who has examined you
in person can diagnose your problems and make decisions which will affect
your health.
......................
Please ignore j..d...
~~~~``````````#####----


Quote:


> > Personally,,,,, (this has no reflection on the case being
discussed),,,,,,
> > the kids I refer out and refuse to treat, is because of the parents
every
> > time.  Difficult children (as regards to dental patients), are made that
way
> > by their parents.  This does not take into account very young children,
and
> > I think I remember the child being discussed as only being 4 yrs old.
> > Children this young needing extensive treatment often need to go the
> > hospital.  And, dental decay in children this small is the fault of the
> > parents EVERY time.  Children cannot be held responsible for their own
> > dental home care until 5-7 years of age.  Even at those ages, they HAVE
to
> > be monitored every brushing session by a parent.  Then, we can discuss
the
> > habits of many parent of putting kids to sleep with bottles (or the
{*filter*}),
> > giving kids milk or drinks right before bed, various snacks, etc.

> > --

> I had understood that there were some medicines and some medical
> conditions that could well result in having serious dental problems.
> That can't possibly be the parents' fault.

> meh
> --
> Children won't care how much you know until they know how much you care



Wed, 01 Mar 2006 02:38:06 GMT
 
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