Sleeping limbs with sleeping brains. 
Author Message
 Sleeping limbs with sleeping brains.

At about 2:30 am today, I woke to discover a clammy thing in my left hand;
it turned out to be my right arm, which had gotten twisted in the sheets and
turned assorted shades of purple.  For about 30 seconds, I could not get my
arm to do anything -- it had no sensation, and did not move when I tried to
move it.  It was rather terrifying.

My right arm then did the `pins and needles' routine for several minutes, and
returned to normal (it has worked fine all day, and seems none the worse for
wear).  But the episode has gotten me wondering: is there some mechanism in
the body to ensure that I wake up when a limb gets the {*filter*} cut off?  How
long can a limb survive with the {*filter*} flow restricted?  Is it likely that
any permanent damage could result from 1-2 minutes of a sleep-applied sheet
torniquet?

And finally, does anybody have any suggestions on how to avoid rolling over
while sleeping?


"It's funny because when I wrote that line I had the thought, ``I wonder if
 this might be good enough to make Darren's quote list?''" -- Jim Schoonover



Thu, 10 Feb 1994 11:17:24 GMT
 Sleeping limbs with sleeping brains.

Quote:

>At about 2:30 am today, I woke to discover a clammy thing in my left hand;
>it turned out to be my right arm, which had gotten twisted in the sheets and
>turned assorted shades of purple.  For about 30 seconds, I could not get my
>arm to do anything -- it had no sensation, and did not move when I tried to
>move it.  It was rather terrifying.

>My right arm then did the `pins and needles' routine for several minutes, and
>returned to normal (it has worked fine all day, and seems none the worse for
>wear).  But the episode has gotten me wondering: is there some mechanism in
>the body to ensure that I wake up when a limb gets the {*filter*} cut off?  How
>long can a limb survive with the {*filter*} flow restricted?  Is it likely that
>any permanent damage could result from 1-2 minutes of a sleep-applied sheet
>torniquet?

You probably were suffering from compression of the nerves to your arm
and not ischemia, from your symptoms.  Unless you are in a drugged sleep,
the pain that results from this will wake you up and make you move.
Permanent damage is usually only seen in junkies and drunks who fail
to awaken when this rather common phenomena occurs.  In fact, we call
wrist drop "saturday night palsy" because of this.

--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Gordon Banks  N3JXP        | "It ain't what you don't know.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------



Fri, 11 Feb 1994 22:43:02 GMT
 Sleeping limbs with sleeping brains.

  Another Poster:

Quote:
> >it turned out to be my right arm, which had gotten twisted in the sheets and
> >turned assorted shades of purple.
> You probably were suffering from compression of the nerves to your arm
> and not ischemia, from your symptoms.

Would compression of the nerves result in these shades of purple?
Indeed, would ischemia?

== Bob Yazz ==



Sat, 12 Feb 1994 09:48:33 GMT
 Sleeping limbs with sleeping brains.
Quote:

>Would compression of the nerves result in these shades of purple?
>Indeed, would ischemia?

The venous return was probably occluded.  The pressure required to
occlude the arteries is greater than that required to produce paraesthesias
and nerve disfunction or occlusion of veins.  While both can occur
together, the nerve disfunction may be produced without a circumferential
compression or diminished flow of {*filter*}.  Try reading for an extended
period on the toilet.  You may find your legs "going to sleep" without
any hint of circulatory compromise.  
--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Gordon Banks  N3JXP        | "It ain't what you don't know.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------


Sat, 12 Feb 1994 21:33:56 GMT
 
 [ 4 post ] 

 Relevant Pages 

1. Sleeping limbs

2. To sleep or not to sleep.....

3. Sleep Deprived After 8-9 Hours Sleep?

4. Testosterone and Sleep: Support for Sleep Theory

5. sleep apnea + sleep paralysis

6. A new cool personal website with links to SLEEP AND SLEEP DISORDERS

7. Sleep Brain Questions

8. Daytime sleep stops brain cells getting fried

9. As we sleep, speedy brain waves boost our ability to learn

10. Brain Degeneration / sleep disorders


 
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software