Q: Paranoia and Bipolar Disorder 
Author Message
 Q: Paranoia and Bipolar Disorder

Quote:

> ________________________________________________
> From Doctor (notice not DoKtor) Phelp's most excellent website:
> http://www.***.com/
> and posted on the website "Bipolar World"
> http://www.***.com/
> ----------------------------------------

> ----
> "It's better to end this way than
> being cremated like a mad cow."

> Q:  Paranoia and Bipolar Disorder

>                My parent has had manic depression many years and takes
> Lithium and has levels checked
>                routinely by the DR...

>                Our family has noticed much paranoia (although always
> was this way to some extent) that is
>                getting worse and worse and is causing great problems.
> She does not see this and will not see
>                a Dr about it, just feels that everyone is against her.
> My question is: if levels are correct does
>                that mean she has been misdiagnosed or has additional
> diagnosis or is this common even when
>                being treated properly. Also, how does a family go
> about getting help for someone when they
>                are not seeing the problem or are not willing to get
> checked out?

>                      Thank you

>                Dear Son/Daughter --
>                Paranoia is definitely a feature of bipolar disorder,
> though many (including many physicians)
>                don't know this.  In several studies (summarized by Dr.
> Jamison, among others) it has been
>                shown to be quite common in this disorder.  So that
> means: a) you don't need to consider
>                another diagnosis; and b) if your parent is paranoid,
> the bipolar disorder is not fully controlled
>                with lithium alone.  Another mood stabilizer; or a
> higher lithium level; or perhaps a low-dose
>                new-generation antipsychotic (my least favorite choice,
> as usually when there is paranoia there
>                are other bipolar symptoms this medication may not
> reach, such as mood lability (easy tears,
>                easy anger)) should be considered.

>                Dr. Phelps

This is to notify the sender that this post should not
be put aside lightly, it should be hurled with great force.

Squiggles :-)



Tue, 13 Jan 2004 09:47:02 GMT
 Q: Paranoia and Bipolar Disorder
Hell, why not simply have her lobotomized. Then you will not have to worry about her.
Or, chill out.
Or, just go ahead and have her committed.
Or, just hit her in the head with a hammer.
Or,

   GIVE HER A WHOLE LOTS OF LOVE. LOTS OF IT. THEN SOME MORE. AND KEEP IT UP.
~~~~ try it. (that inc. lots of attention)

Quote:
> "It's better to end this way than
> being cremated like a mad cow."

> Q:  Paranoia and Bipolar Disorder
> She does not see this and will not see
>                a Dr about it, just feels that everyone is against her.

Are they?
Quote:
> My question is: if levels are correct does
>                that mean she has been misdiagnosed or has additional
> diagnosis or is this common even when
>                being treated properly. Also, how does a family go
> about getting help for someone when they
>                are not seeing the problem or are not willing to get
> checked out?

>                      Thank you

>                Dear Son/Daughter --
>                Paranoia is definitely a feature of bipolar disorder,
> though many (including many physicians)
>                don't know this.  In several studies (summarized by Dr.
> Jamison, among others) it has been
>                shown to be quite common in this disorder.  So that
> means: a) you don't need to consider
>                another diagnosis; and b) if your parent is paranoid,
> the bipolar disorder is not fully controlled
>                with lithium alone.  Another mood stabilizer; or a
> higher lithium level; or perhaps a low-dose
>                new-generation antipsychotic (my least favorite choice,
> as usually when there is paranoia there
>                are other bipolar symptoms this medication may not
> reach, such as mood lability (easy tears,
>                easy anger)) should be considered.

>                Dr. Phelps



Tue, 13 Jan 2004 20:21:15 GMT
 Q: Paranoia and Bipolar Disorder
OOps..  sorry. '
that last message was from a "Card Carrying..."
in case you missed it.
Quote:

> ________________________________________________
> From Doctor (notice not DoKtor) Phelp's most excellent website:
> http://www.psycheducation.org/
> and posted on the website "Bipolar World"
> http://www.bipolarworld.net
> ----------------------------------------

> ----
> "It's better to end this way than
> being cremated like a mad cow."

> Q:  Paranoia and Bipolar Disorder

>                My parent has had manic depression many years and takes
> Lithium and has levels checked
>                routinely by the DR...

>                Our family has noticed much paranoia (although always
> was this way to some extent) that is
>                getting worse and worse and is causing great problems.
> She does not see this and will not see
>                a Dr about it, just feels that everyone is against her.
> My question is: if levels are correct does
>                that mean she has been misdiagnosed or has additional
> diagnosis or is this common even when
>                being treated properly. Also, how does a family go
> about getting help for someone when they
>                are not seeing the problem or are not willing to get
> checked out?

>                      Thank you

>                Dear Son/Daughter --
>                Paranoia is definitely a feature of bipolar disorder,
> though many (including many physicians)
>                don't know this.  In several studies (summarized by Dr.
> Jamison, among others) it has been
>                shown to be quite common in this disorder.  So that
> means: a) you don't need to consider
>                another diagnosis; and b) if your parent is paranoid,
> the bipolar disorder is not fully controlled
>                with lithium alone.  Another mood stabilizer; or a
> higher lithium level; or perhaps a low-dose
>                new-generation antipsychotic (my least favorite choice,
> as usually when there is paranoia there
>                are other bipolar symptoms this medication may not
> reach, such as mood lability (easy tears,
>                easy anger)) should be considered.

>                Dr. Phelps



Tue, 13 Jan 2004 20:22:34 GMT
 
 [ 3 post ] 

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