Nose Spray Addiction 
Author Message
 Nose Spray Addiction

I am relatively new to this group and I haven't seen this topic
come up at all.  I am {*filter*}ed to nose spray and have been for
years, due partly to very {*filter*} allergies during the summer.  My
questions are:

How did I get to this stage (why do I need to keep using the spray
in order to keep my nasal passages clear so I can breathe and
eat and taste, etc.)?
Aside from cold turkey, which I assume means being plugged up
for weeks, are there any other ways to get off the stuff?

Thanks,
  Michael



Fri, 14 Apr 1995 01:06:38 GMT
 Nose Spray Addiction

Quote:
> I am relatively new to this group and I haven't seen this topic
> come up at all.  I am {*filter*}ed to nose spray and have been for
> years, due partly to very {*filter*} allergies during the summer.  My
> questions are:

> How did I get to this stage (why do I need to keep using the spray
> in order to keep my nasal passages clear so I can breathe and
> eat and taste, etc.)?
> Aside from cold turkey, which I assume means being plugged up
> for weeks, are there any other ways to get off the stuff?

I got hooked on nose spray many years back, and asked the allergist
how to get back off (the effect you're fighting is called rebound
congestion).  His suggestion was to switch to the "baby" dosage
of the spray, then use it in one nostril every other day, then
every third day, every fourth day, etc.

I asked why I couldn't just dilute the current supply with sterile
saline 50% on day 1, then an additional 50% on day 2, then an additional
50% on day 3.  He allowed that would work, but never had anyone try it,
so he gave me some sterile saline.

Worked fine.  I was off in 4 days.  I still use it _occasionally_, but
never for more than 2-3 days.  That seems to be the secret to avoiding
rebound.

Kay Klier  Biology Dept  UNI



Fri, 14 Apr 1995 04:08:27 GMT
 Nose Spray Addiction

Quote:
>            Cold turkey is the only way that will really get you off it, but

Nasal steroids will help too.  See your friendly local allergist
or ENT man.


Fri, 14 Apr 1995 11:38:28 GMT
 Nose Spray Addiction

Quote:
>How did I get to this stage (why do I need to keep using the spray
>in order to keep my nasal passages clear so I can breathe and
>eat and taste, etc.)?
>Aside from cold turkey, which I assume means being plugged up
>for weeks, are there any other ways to get off the stuff?

Someone else mentioned diluting the spray with saline.  I have done this
and it does work.  If when you do need it, continue to only use it diluted.
Also, I will only use it at night; unless I am really sick with a sinus
infection.

Also, the allergist can give you a prescription of Beconase or Vancanese
(same thing) or Nasalide, which are steroid sprays (none {*filter*}ing).  For
most people these work like a gem, but of course they didn't for me.

If you are really bad, a friend of mine took an {*filter*}steriod decongestant
for short term use.

It would really be helpful to go to the doctor for help.  Once you get
off the spray, if you still have problems, let him diagnose why and
set you up on a program whether it be allergy related or what.

Good Luck.  I think I have to just live with a stuffy nose problem at
night for the rest of my life.  Nothing has worked for me so far.
If you come up with any helpful hints that helped you, let us all know.



Sat, 15 Apr 1995 08:05:58 GMT
 Nose Spray Addiction
I was {*filter*}ed to the 12-hour sprays for about 6 weeks. (They turned
into 5-minute sprays ): I got off by switching to the mildest
phenylephrine spray on the market. It took only 24 hours in my case.

It's pretty damn embarrassing, ain't it? Much luck!



Sat, 15 Apr 1995 13:21:01 GMT
 Nose Spray Addiction

Quote:
>Aside from cold turkey, which I assume means being plugged up
>for weeks, are there any other ways to get off the stuff?

Get a steamer, and when you use the spray to clear your nose, breath
the steam through your nose for about 30 minutes.  Steam is far
more therapeutic than sprays, which I will only use if I'm on an
airplane and need immediate relief to keep my head from exploding.  
They're bad news otherwise.

In a week or so, you'll find that all you need to keep your
nose clear is steam once in awhile, throw the sprays away
(unless you have a cold and have to get on an airplane).

Keith



Sun, 16 Apr 1995 03:52:55 GMT
 Nose Spray Addiction

Quote:
>Aside from cold turkey, which I assume means being plugged up
>for weeks, are there any other ways to get off the stuff?

Irrigate your nasal passage with a solution of 1 teaspoon baking soda
per one cup of very warm water. Do it once or twice per day. Use a nasal
syringe. They may be purchased at any pharmacy for about $2.

An ENT doctor taught me the procedure several years ago. He said it is
benign and non-irritating, and you can do it on a long-term basis with no harm.
He recommendeds nasal irrigation instead of prescribing {*filter*}.



Mon, 17 Apr 1995 01:22:55 GMT
 Nose Spray Addiction


Quote:
>An ENT doctor taught me the procedure several years ago.
>...
>He recommendeds nasal irrigation instead of prescribing {*filter*}.

Well, I'm sure it's more fun, but does it pay as well?     :-)  :-)
--
Will Martin



Mon, 17 Apr 1995 02:42:41 GMT
 Nose Spray Addiction

Quote:


>>An ENT doctor taught me the procedure several years ago.
>>...
>>He recommendeds nasal irrigation instead of prescribing {*filter*}.

>Well, I'm sure it's more fun, but does it pay as well?     :-)  :-)

I am not sure I understand this. When I see a patient, I certainly
don't make any money off of writing a prescription, and I suspect
it may in fact be illegal to charge for writing a prescription,
although some physicians charge for phoning in a prescription to
a pharmacy. When I see you I charge you for seeing you, examining
you, and coming up with an idea of what is wrong and how to go about
fixing it. If you come to me and I suggest nasal irrigation, you will
get the same bill as if I prescribed medication, or nothing at all.

Now some people will say that be limiting the refills on a prescription,
the physician is in effect charging for prescribing medication, since
the patient has to come back in to get another prescription. Refills
are limited in order to get the patient to come back, but not for that
reason: the reason is that, depending on the medication and condition,
it is usually not responsible to simply give the patient an endless
supply of medication without followup. For example, if I diagnosed
hypothyroidism and gave you an endless script for thyroid hormone
without making arrangements for getting thyroid function tests or
a TSH level at intervals to make certain you weren't getting too
much or too little medication. Yes, this is forcing you to come in
to see me again, but there is a good, sound reason for it. If I gave
you the endless supply of thyroid medication without making such
arrangements, and you ended up with problems from taking too much
medication, you could successfully sue me for not adequately
following up on your condition. By the way, you can also successfully
sue me in some settings (private practice), if I make arrangements
for your followup, you don't show up for the followup, and I don't
call you to reschedule your followup!

 -km



Sat, 22 Apr 1995 08:39:46 GMT
 
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