Information on immunotherapy (allergy shots) for toddler sought 
Author Message
 Information on immunotherapy (allergy shots) for toddler sought

We had our two year old son allergy-tested yesterday, and he showed up as
being allergic to molds and dust.  The allergist recommended starting him
on immunotherapy (allergy shots) as soon as possible.  I'd appreciate any
information (or experiences) readers have on allergy shots:  How successful
are they in actually eliminating the allergy?  What are the downsides?  Is one
free of the allergy for life?   I've had one parent tell me that they have
avoided immunotherapy for their child because it is {*filter*} the kid and not
always successful.  The allergist didn't give me the impression that the
success rate was anything less than 100%.

Our son had a lousy year with colds, having perhaps 8 or 9 ear infections,
although in at least a couple of cases they were continuations of infections
that hadn't cleared from the previous infection. He also had lot of congestion
which just seemed to hang around whether he was healthy or not.  The congestion
is what led his pediatrician to suggest the visit to the allergist.

I didn't have any luck finding a good book on children's allergies - if anyone
can make a recommendation, I'd appreciate it.  Any information would be of
help to us in making our decision.

Thanks in advance,
mb
--

Disclaimer:  booloo speaks for booloo and no other.



Sun, 03 Dec 1995 01:59:57 GMT
 Information on immunotherapy (allergy shots) for toddler sought

Quote:

>We had our two year old son allergy-tested yesterday, and he showed up as
>being allergic to molds and dust.  The allergist recommended starting him
>on immunotherapy (allergy shots) as soon as possible.  I'd appreciate any
>information (or experiences) readers have on allergy shots <...>

Allergy shots just about never cure allergies.  What they try to do is expose
you to the things you are allergic to, in tiny amounts, to train your body to
minimize its allergic reaction.

I had allergy shots for nearly 20 years, starting at age 4, and I still suffer
from hay fever.  I remember the shots as being extremely traumatic when I was
very little.  The doctor told me that if I said "hossenfeffer" while he was
giving the shot, it wouldn't hurt.  It didn't work, but to this day, whenever
I get a shot, I silently say "hossenfeffer" just in case:-)  My mother has
been getting the shots for about 30 years and still has allergies.  But she
believes they help, so she still goes.  Two of my sisters got the shots
throughout childhood, weren't cured, and don't get them any more.  My father
had the shots for maybe a year and they made no difference.

I don't get allergy shots anymore either.  Instead I use a nasal spray called
Nasalcrom (I think the drug is cromalyn) and have had much better luck with
the spray than I ever had with the shots.

You might have better luck trying to allergy-proof your child's bedroom, by
reducing the dust and the mites.  Try these things:
        use an airtight cover around the mattress - tape the zipper seam with
          duct tape
        remove the carpeting if possible
        use shades instead of venetian blinds
        avoid curtains or use some that can be washed frequently
        wash bedding regularly in HOT water - cold doesn't kill dust mites
          - including blankets and bedspreads
        discourage lots of stuffed animals, especially on the bed
        only vaccuum once a week - more frequently just spreads dust around
        keep pets out of his bedroom

Quote:

>Our son had a lousy year with colds, having perhaps 8 or 9 ear infections,
>although in at least a couple of cases they were continuations of infections
>that hadn't cleared from the previous infection. He also had lot of congestion
>which just seemed to hang around whether he was healthy or not.

Our just-turned-2-year-old also shows symptoms of hay fever, but our
pediatrician told us that allergy testing a toddler can give inconclusive
results.  I guess the kids can develop/grow out of allergies quickly at this
age.  The doctor recommended we use liquid Dimetapp regularly as a preventive
measure.  We haven't done this as I'm uncomfortable giving my baby {*filter*} all
the time (am I being silly?), but we do use the Dimetapp when Alex's nose
starts to drip, and it does seem to help.

But I'd be interested in anything you learn, too.

--Karen

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Karen Bircsak
Concurrent Computer Corporation


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Sun, 03 Dec 1995 21:50:58 GMT
 Information on immunotherapy (allergy shots) for toddler sought
Quote:

>We had our two year old son allergy-tested yesterday, and he showed up as
>being allergic to molds and dust.  The allergist recommended starting him
>on immunotherapy (allergy shots) as soon as possible.  I'd appreciate any
>information (or experiences) readers have on allergy shots:  How successful

Well, most of you know we've done the testing.  Our allergist said Alex was
the most allergic 2y he'd seen (now 3), and that he'd bet he'd need shots.  BUT
he said kid's allergies often change, and they don't give shots until the
child is at least 5!!  Not to mention that Alex will need to see this Dr alot,
so being completely traumatized by so many shots would make things difficult
(can you tell the Dr is a parent with an allergic/asthmatic kid?).

Find out about and make environmental changes first, then evaluate.  They have
been VERY successful with Alex (dust and pollen allergies, asthma).  This is
important even if you do end up with the shots.  Depending on symptoms, there
are also medicines with few/no side effects, ie. nasalcrom for the nose.  Seems
to be me shots would be a last resort, especially for such a little one.
-Amy



Mon, 04 Dec 1995 00:25:57 GMT
 Information on immunotherapy (allergy shots) for toddler sought
Quote:
>I don't get allergy shots anymore either.  Instead I use a nasal spray called
>Nasalcrom (I think the drug is cromalyn) and have had much better luck with

Sodium cromolyn - also called Intal in inhaler form.  NO known side effects,

If you don't want to get rid of carpeting, treat it for dust with acarosan,
bought for $$$ at professional pharmacies.  Binds the mites and their wastes
so they're non-allergenic.  It works!

Great suggestions!!  Although I'd say NO pets in house.  Also, keep humidity
under 30%, expecially for mold allergies.

Quote:
>the time (am I being silly?), but we do use the Dimetapp when Alex's nose
>starts to drip, and it does seem to help.

Gee, mine is also Alex!  Did you ask about nasalcrom for him?  It really helps
our Alex alot, we almost NEVER need an antihistamine too.

-Amy
(again)



Mon, 04 Dec 1995 00:34:16 GMT
 Information on immunotherapy (allergy shots) for toddler sought
I was tested at age 4 and began receiving injections at that time. It did
help me considerably and I was never traumatized by injections. I recall
being told it would hurt a little bit and the person giving them would
pinch your arm (very slightly) to demonstrate. My younger brother also
received allery injections - same thing, no trauma and quite a bit of
relief.

I was able to quit the shots at about age ~10 and was not terribly
bothered by allergies unless I tried playing football in dry grass -
rolling in the grass would set me off.  When I moved to a different
geographic location, the allergies started up again, so at age 25
I began the immunotherapy again. I managed to get some relief but
could never build up to the full dosage targets. (There seemed to
be a correlation between my stress levels and my ability to handle
the dosages) I gave up the injections about 6 years ago and am able
to get by with prescription medications.

My closest friends have had both of their daughters receiving injections
since they were 5. It cut down on their "colds" and ear infections
quite considerably.

Just my $.02 worth.



Mon, 04 Dec 1995 04:46:44 GMT
 Information on immunotherapy (allergy shots) for toddler sought
I am currently receiving allergy shots and did for 7 years as a child (age
6-13).  They help.  I was traumatized more by the testing than the short
-- I remember it vividly (I am 31).  

My 5 year old has alot of respiratory problems and alot of allergies.  She
has been getting shots for almost a year now.  At first she wasn't too
thrilled, but now she looks forward to getting them with her mother --
it's a game.  I think they are helping her.  The most dramatic improvement
has been from removing dairy products from her diet.  She tested positive
to wheat and soy.  Removing them from her diet helped some.  I have read
alot from milk allergy and my other child and I are allergic to it so I
decided to try it (with the supervision of her pediatrician).  3 weeks
brought dramatic improvement.  If you would like any more information or
more detail please write.

Andrea Kwiatkowski



Mon, 04 Dec 1995 23:48:34 GMT
 Information on immunotherapy (allergy shots) for toddler sought


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Information on immunotherapy (allergy shots) for toddler sought

Quote:



>>We had our two year old son allergy-tested yesterday, and he showed up as
>>being allergic to molds and dust.  The allergist recommended starting him
>>on immunotherapy (allergy shots) as soon as possible.  I'd appreciate any
>>information (or experiences) readers have on allergy shots <...>

> You might have better luck trying to allergy-proof your child's bedroom, by
> reducing the dust and the mites.  Try these things:
>    use an airtight cover around the mattress - tape the zipper seam with
>      duct tape

        sometimes called allergy covers

Quote:
>    remove the carpeting if possible
>    use shades instead of venetian blinds
>    avoid curtains or use some that can be washed frequently
>    wash bedding regularly in HOT water - cold doesn't kill dust mites
>      - including blankets and bedspreads

        no perfume detergent or soap may be helpful, as is a vinegar
                rinse

Quote:
>    discourage lots of stuffed animals, especially on the bed
>    only vaccuum once a week - more frequently just spreads dust around

        gotta use a water or other vacuum that has "micron" sized filters

Quote:
>    keep pets out of his bedroom

        Great list!  Let me add buying a room sized air filter (reviewed
in Consumer Reports, ask your librarian).  Treat the environment because
an allergic kid *may* recover if the exposure to these allergens is reduced.
In the case of cooking.net">food allergies they are saying two years elimination diet
if the allergy is detected before the age of two.  
        If you get a *really* allergic kid you'll have to remove carpets
everywhere, and get rid of any pets.

                                                        Curt



Mon, 04 Dec 1995 20:54:35 GMT
 Information on immunotherapy (allergy shots) for toddler sought


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT
 Information on immunotherapy (allergy shots) for toddler sought
I have no experience with immunotherapy, but some of the information
below may be of use to those with dust or mold allergies.

-- Pete TerMaat

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
The following is a collection of information on dust mite allergies

comments or suggestions.

                        DUST MITE ALLERGIES

INFO

  - Bachman, Judy, _Allergy Environment Guidebook: New Hope & Help for
    Living & Working Allergy-Free_, c. 1990, Putnam Publishing Group,
    257 pages.  Information on allergies, effects of stress, advice on
    building, decorating, remodeling and otherwise coping with
    allergies.  More depth and detail than most books on environmental
    allergies.

  - Aslett, Don, _Make Your House Do The Housework_, c. 1986 Writer's
    Digest Books, 201 pages.  Tells you how to design and decorate a
    house so that it requires a minimum of cleaning and maintenance.

  - Consumer Reports, Oct 1992, reviews a number of air purifiers.
    Friedrich C90 is the top-rated model.  512-225-2000 is the Friedrich
    number.  A mail-order provider is S and S Buying Service,
    212-575-0210.

  - Consumer Reports, Feb 1993, reviews vacuum cleaners, including the
    Nilfisk GS 90.  They found it effective at filtering dust
    particles.  Suggested that the best solution for the severely
    allergic may be to limit the use of carpeting.

  - USENET misc.consumers.house archive on central vacuum cleaners,
    available by electronic mail.  Send a message to

    receive the archive.

PRODUCTS

  - Allergy Control Products, 1-800-422-3878.  Offer encasings made of
    fabrics which they claim keep out dust mites while allowing water
    vapor to pass through.  Less clammy than the usual vinyl
    encasings.  Also filters, dust sealants, asthma supplies.
    They offer a pamphlet,  "Understanding Vacuum Cleaners, Vacuum
    Exhaust and Allergen Containment."  Separate catalogs for dust,
    mold, and cat allergies.

  - Bio-Tech Systems, 1-800-621-5545.  A 17 page catalog containing
    information and products related to dust allergies, mold allergies,
    and asthma.  Filters, masks, mattress and pillow encasings, dust
    sealants, dust mite removers, mold preventers, nebulizers.

  - Allergy and Asthma Products Company, 1-800-221-6483.  A 5 page guide
    to dust, mold, and asthma control, and 2 pages of products.
    Filters, bedding protectors, sprays, masks.

  - The AL-R-G Shoppe, Inc., 305-981-9182.  A 17 page catalog.  Lots of
    cosmetics, jewelry, plus the usual filters and mattress encasings.

  - Allergy Controlled Environments, 1-800-882-4110

  - Allergy Relief Shop, 615-522-2795
    2932 Middlebrook Pike, Knoxville, TE 37921



Mon, 04 Dec 1995 23:47:47 GMT
 Information on immunotherapy (allergy shots) for toddler sought

   We had our two year old son allergy-tested yesterday, and he showed up as
   being allergic to molds and dust.  The allergist recommended starting him
   on immunotherapy (allergy shots) as soon as possible.  

Shots for dust allergies are very controversial. There was an FDA
advisory panel in 1986 that advised taking the house-dust extracts
used off of the market because they are potentially unsafe and highly
variable from batch to batch. Among allergists there appears to be
strong disagreement about whether or not they actually work.

Shots for mold allergies are probably ineffective --- it's hard to
say. The few studies have been inconclusive.

   The allergist didn't give me the impression that the success rate
   was anything less than 100%.

Shots are quite a cash cow for the the doctor, donchaknow? A former
president of the American Academy of Allergy said that only 20-25
percent of his allergic patients were elegible for shots, and
suggested that many doctors are too eager to give them. The shots are
not 100% effective, particularly for molds and dust.

   I didn't have any luck finding a good book on children's allergies - if anyone
   can make a recommendation, I'd appreciate it.  Any information would be of
   help to us in making our decision.

You might want to get an *independent* second opinion as well as checking up on your
current allergists qualifications. You can check credentials by calling
the American Board of Allergy and Immunology in Philadelphia
(215-349-9466).

If it were my child, I wouldn't do it unless it was a life threatening
problem with a good success rate (such as an insect allergy). The
protocol requires one or two shots a week for 4-6 months, and then
once a month for a couple of years. I know people who have been
treated like this for 5 years without any success.

sdb
--



Fri, 08 Dec 1995 10:08:15 GMT
 Information on immunotherapy (allergy shots) for toddler sought
Yes, the environmental approach can be a real pain and a real expense,
but it does help - if you do it effectively. It does not help your
child to dust his/her room if you let him/her sleep with stuffed
animals, on an unsealed down pillow, on an unsealed mattress, in a
carpeted room, etc. It can do your allergic child harm if you vacuum
the house while he/she is around, or if he/she returns shortly after
vacuuming. We knew that these steps would help us, but never did
anything. When our kids developed severe problems, we didn't hesitate
to take drastic action, especially if it meant that we were able to
reduce their discomfort, the number of trips to the emergency room, or
the amount of medication that they were required to take.

This is what we did for our little asthmatics:

        We started on their bedroom, where they spend aprox. 50% of
        their time:

        - removed all stuffed animals
        - removed all books
        - sealed their mattresses and pillows in high-quality
          dust-proof enclosures.
        - removed the carpeting
        - removed all draperies and curtains
        - removed upholstered furniture
        - moved most of their dust-collecting toys and furniture into
          another room
        - purchased an HEPA air filter

        For the rest of the house, we:

        - found new homes for our cats and dogs. Besides eliminating
          the animal dander, there's far less skin and hair for the
          mites to thrive in.
        - removed all carpeting except on the stairs, where it
          cushions their all-to-frequent falls
        - removed upholstered furniture
        - removed all draperies and curtains

Since we have hot-water heat, we didn't need to deal with the dust
problem associated with hot air systems. You'd be amazed at how much
dust collects in the ducts of a hot air system!

We vacuum only when the kids are away for a couple of hours (a real
pain!). After this, we damp-mop the floors and damp-dust
the furniture and woodwork in order to reduce the amount of dust.

I'm sure I've forgotten something, but hopefully you get the point:
the dust must be eliminated, not just pushed around or stirred up so
that they can breathe it.

--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mark Feblowitz,   GTE Laboratories Inc., 40 Sylvan Rd.  Waltham, MA 02254



Sun, 10 Dec 1995 03:08:51 GMT
 Information on immunotherapy (allergy shots) for toddler sought

Quote:

>strong disagreement about whether or not they actually work.

I had dust in my serum and I no longer test positive for a dust allergy.

Quote:

>Shots for mold allergies are probably ineffective --- it's hard to

I'm almost positive that mold was also in my serum and I know I don't test
positive for mold now.


Sun, 10 Dec 1995 21:09:29 GMT
 
 [ 13 post ] 

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