Motion sickness question 
Author Message
 Motion sickness question

I am one of those unlucky people who can not read in a moving vehicle.  Is there
a way to train oneself not to get sick while reading in a car?  I have a daily
90 minute commute via public transportation, and would love to be able to study
en route.
--



Sun, 03 Jul 1994 02:58:36 GMT
 Motion sickness question

Quote:

> I am one of those unlucky people who can not read in a moving vehicle.  Is there
> a way to train oneself not to get sick while reading in a car?  I have a daily
> 90 minute commute via public transportation, and would love to be able to study
> en route.

This is a hard problem.  There seems to be some kind of coordination between
the inner ear/balance sense and the visual sense.  If what you see anticipates
or confirms the motion that you balance feels, there is minimal distress.
When you concentrate on a book, you are decoupling your visual sense from the
environment and substituting a limited visual field that may move contrary to
the environment.

You can try the usual things, fresh air, periodically refocusing on the
environment or not reading during the most offensive motion.  These may or
may not do any good, but you might be able to stretch the duration before
you feel severe distress.  If not, you might want to consider books on tape,
especially if there is a lending library around.

--
George Robbins - now working for,     uucp:   {uunet|pyramid|rutgers}!cbmvax!grr

Commodore, Engineering Department     phone:  215-431-9349 (only by moonlite)



Sun, 03 Jul 1994 15:06:00 GMT
 Motion sickness question
Quote:

> I am one of those unlucky people who can not read in a moving vehicle.  Is there
> a way to train oneself not to get sick while reading in a car?  I have a daily
> 90 minute commute via public transportation, and would love to be able to study
> en route.

Well Debbie, I've always found Dramamine to be effective for me, but I I've
never really had that much of a problem with motion sickness.  I have noticed
that I tend to have more problems if I have not eaten recently or if I have
eaten really greasy food.  Something about my stomach having a job to do
instead of merely churning seems to do the trick for me.  I have found that
where you sit in the vehicle can effect how you are stimulated by motion.  I
don't have much of a problem wherever I sit as long as I can look out a window
when I need to.  When I get sick in a vehicle it is usually due to improperly
percieving my movement relative to my environment, and if I can keep a relative
bearing on which way we are travelling (and which direction is UP!) I can do
alright no matter what I am doing inside the vehicle.  I can`t think of any
exercises you can do to become accustomed to reading in moving vehicles.  


Wed, 06 Jul 1994 01:24:00 GMT
 Motion sickness question

Quote:

}I am one of those unlucky people who can not read in a moving vehicle.  Is there
}a way to train oneself not to get sick while reading in a car?  I have a daily
}90 minute commute via public transportation, and would love to be able to study
}en route.

I have the same problem.  I've heard there've been experiments with
biofeedback to control motion sickness, but they've met with little
success.

Have you considered books on tape?  You can get (rent) unabridged versions
these days, often read by the author.


Head Robot Wrangler at Citicorp                   Turn the rascals out!
3100 Ocean Park Blvd.   (310) 450-9111, x2483     No incumbents in '92!
Santa Monica, CA  90405 {rutgers|pyramid|philabs|psivax}!ttidca!hollombe



Wed, 06 Jul 1994 05:08:33 GMT
 Motion sickness question


Quote:


>>> I am one of those unlucky people who can not read in a moving vehicle.  Is there

Does anyone know the status of the testing of Dilantin (sp?)
as a motion sickness remedy?>
--
         Practice Random Kindness And Senseless Acts of Beauty.



Thu, 07 Jul 1994 00:21:04 GMT
 Motion sickness question

Quote:

> I am one of those unlucky people who can not read in a moving vehicle.
> Is there a way to train oneself not to get sick while reading in a car?
> I have a daily 90 minute commute via public transportation, and would
> love to be able to study en route.

The only advice I can offer is to reduce head movement within the vehicle
to a minimum by using some sort of head support.  A motion sickness drug
may help, but I would be less tempted to advise this if you're studying as
all these {*filter*} have CNS depressant effects.  If you do try medication,
preferably take cyclizine, if it is available in your country, as this is
the least sedating motion sickness drug.

--

PO Box 3929,       ( oo )    :... Voice: +64 4 3899444
Wellington,          \/......:
New Zealand.                      Learn first aid; it saves lives.



Fri, 08 Jul 1994 04:08:51 GMT
 Motion sickness question

I've tried all the over-the-counter anti-motion-sickness medicines
with no great success (I fly a hang glider, and it's important not
to throw up while doing so when flying close to other pilots or
while on landing approach :-)

Several years ago I read that NASA was testing the spice, ginger, and
had determined it worked.  I bought some, and put it in gelatin
capsules or just spread it on cooking.net">food before flying, and it made more of
a difference than Dramamine, Marezine or the other OTC stuff without
any fuzzy-headedness.

Now I'm using the stick-on scopolamine patches (Transderm Scop), by
prescription.  Using just one-third of a patch lasts me three days,
and I have no nausea at all even in very bumpy air.  Using an
entire patch gave me noticeable dry mouth, so I kept cutting them
down in size.



Tue, 19 Jul 1994 10:48:31 GMT
 Motion sickness question

Quote:

>I've tried all the over-the-counter anti-motion-sickness medicines
>with no great success (I fly a hang glider, and it's important not
>to throw up while doing so when flying close to other pilots or
>while on landing approach :-)

Also, presumably, important not to go to sleep.  I'd be hesitant to take
Dramamine or use a scopolamine patch when flying any kind of aircraft,
even a hang glider.

Quote:
>Several years ago I read that NASA was testing the spice, ginger, and
>had determined it worked.  I bought some, and put it in gelatin
>capsules or just spread it on cooking.net">food before flying, and it made more of
>a difference than Dramamine, Marezine or the other OTC stuff without
>any fuzzy-headedness.

Useful.  Coca-Cola is also well known for its ability to reduce nausea.

--
===================================================================

Artificial Intelligence Programs | U of Georgia | Athens, GA  30602
===================================================================



Wed, 20 Jul 1994 02:38:21 GMT
 Motion sickness question

Quote:
>Useful.  Coca-Cola is also well known for its ability to reduce nausea.

My understanding of this is that "Coke syrup" is traditionally
considered to have a mild antinauseant action, probably due, if
anything, to the hypertonic sugar solution having a kind of local
demulcent action on the stomach.  Diluting it into a beverage would
remove this quality.  There is a similar proprietary non-beverage
preparation called "Emetrol" which is a phosphorated solution of
glucose and fructose (in other words, more or less identical to
Coke syrup except that it's not cola-flavored, and doesn't contain
caffeine.)

--
Steve Dyer



Wed, 20 Jul 1994 03:29:21 GMT
 Motion sickness question

Quote:
>Useful.  Coca-Cola is also well known for its ability to reduce nausea.

That explains why when the one time I and a few friends came down with
"Chinese Restaurant Syndrome" (which some claim to be caused by MSG -
and I hate to open that can of worms) the drinking of my coke seemed
to relieve the symptoms.
--

                                            USENET:uunet!mdisea!rudoff  
"Suppose the world was only one of God's jokes, would you work any the less
to make it a good joke, instead of a bad one?" - George Bernard Shaw


Wed, 20 Jul 1994 05:50:42 GMT
 Motion sickness question

Quote:

>>Useful.  Coca-Cola is also well known for its ability to reduce nausea.

>That explains why when the one time I and a few friends came down with
>"Chinese Restaurant Syndrome" (which some claim to be caused by MSG -
>and I hate to open that can of worms) the drinking of my coke seemed
>to relieve the symptoms.

Gosh, I hope you didn't read my followup which indicated that
you didn't feel any better... :-) :-)

--
Steve Dyer



Wed, 20 Jul 1994 08:25:57 GMT
 Motion sickness question


Quote:

>>Useful.  Coca-Cola is also well known for its ability to reduce nausea.

>That explains why when the one time I and a few friends came down with
>"Chinese Restaurant Syndrome" (which some claim to be caused by MSG -
>and I hate to open that can of worms) the drinking of my coke seemed
>to relieve the symptoms.
>--

Did you eat fried rice?  Did your symptoms include nausea and
vomiting after about 2-6 hours or diarrhea after about 12?  
If so, you probably had "food poisoning" due to B. cereus
bacterial infection of rice.  This bacterium grows on cooked rice
that is kept at room temperature - some chinese restaurants keep
huge pots of cooked rice like this to keep it from getting sticky.
The B. cereus spores survive the original cooking, germinate
as the rice cools slowly, and produce a toxin that survives the
brief frying time.  


Wed, 20 Jul 1994 10:45:40 GMT
 Motion sickness question

writes:

Quote:
> Now I'm using the stick-on scopolamine patches (Transderm Scop), by
> prescription.  Using just one-third of a patch lasts me three days,
> and I have no nausea at all even in very bumpy air.  Using an
> entire patch gave me noticeable dry mouth, so I kept cutting them
> down in size.

Scopolamine (hyoscine) is generally a more effective motion sickness
drug than the antihistamines.  However, withdrawal reactions can occur
after prolonged use (it has happened with 9 days' use) of the trans-
dermal patches.  I had a reference to this but can't find it.

--

PO Box 3929,       ( oo )    :... Voice: +64 4 3899444
Wellington,          \/......:
New Zealand.                      Learn first aid; it saves lives.



Sat, 23 Jul 1994 01:30:57 GMT
 Motion sickness question

Quote:

>Scopolamine (hyoscine) is generally a more effective motion sickness
>drug than the antihistamines.  However, withdrawal reactions can occur
>after prolonged use (it has happened with 9 days' use) of the trans-
>dermal patches.  I had a reference to this but can't find it.

they are wonderful.  but i am surprised about the withdrawal reactions.

three years ago i used the for five weeks, due to a horrific nausea problem
that would have put me on disability had it not been for the patches.  when
i stopped them, finally the nausea abated, i had no problems whatsoever,
was i lucky?  i would be interested in knowing the withdrawal reactions.

my most noticable side effect was doll's eyes, i.e., large pupils, and
being green eyed, certainly it was noticable.  



Mon, 25 Jul 1994 06:05:29 GMT
 
 [ 14 post ] 

 Relevant Pages 

1. Motion sickness: Ginger?

2. MOTION SICKNESS

3. Motion Sickness & Instructing

4. Motion Sickness in 3D

5. Anti-motion sickness remedies?

6. Motion sickness thanks

7. motion sickness patches

8. motion sickness

9. Motion sickness: Ginger?

10. Summary of motion sickness remedies?

11. Help (Motion Sickness)

12. Need Info on Motion Sickness Bracelet


 
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software