Poison Ivy 
Author Message
 Poison Ivy

 I need some information about Poison Ivy..Bieing born and raised in ALASKA i
am not very familiar with both snakes and poison ivy..I have not yet had any
encounters with snakes but i am presently eat up with Poison Ivy..I heard that
poison ivy does not spread. Where the initial encounter is, that is where the
rash is..I was out in the backyard cleaning up near a fence and was covered
except for my knees to my ankles..Next day i had rashes from my knees to my
ankles...The next day it spread to my waist, not a solid rash but lines of
bumps..Now it is on my back in a couple places..I now believe either it spreads
or i must have rolled up my smock and carried it into the house next to my body
and it spread that way...Question is..Does Poison Ivy spread? Can you contack a
rash from Poison Ivy after the plant is dead and the vine is dry? And most of
all what can i do to get rid of this terrible rash..I put Hydrocortizone on it
and also Oxidol soap (the brown soap). Still seems to be spreading and its
driving me up a wall..I tried taking a BENADRIL pill since it is supposed to be
for allergies but in about 15 minutes it knocked me out.Any suggestion about
any new miracle drug or old fashioned remedy for Poison Ivy??
    DAN

--  
Uucp: ...{gatech,ames,rutgers}!ncar!asuvax!stjhmc!360!1.14!Dan.Drake



Sun, 22 Nov 1992 09:25:04 GMT
 Poison Ivy
The worst case of poison ivy I ever had I got in the winter playing in an
area where poison ivy had been the summer before.  There was at least 6 inches
of snow on the ground.  I thought the rash/blisters was caused by an oil on
the leaves.  If this is true, it is the presence of this oil that is dangerous,
not the current health of the plant.

Quote:
>...is possible to get it just by barely brushing against it - the
>substance on the leaf which makes you break out is invisible and can
>be carried by the wind or a distrubance of the leaf, which might
>explain how you got it on your back - it can be picked up and carried
>by clothing also and then transferred to your skin. ...

Quite true.  Another thing to watch out for is standing downwind of burning
t{*filter*}s that may contain poison ivy.  I've heard the smoke can carry the
oils.

Quote:
>...  When you pop these blisters, the fluid spreads it further on your body,
> wherever the fluid is transferred. ...

I've heard that the fluid inside the blisters is the same as the fluid inside
any blister, and cannot spread the poison ivy.  The "spreading", i.e. appearance
of fresh rash days after the initial rash, was explained as the result of some
areas having a less intense exposure, possibly as a result of the oils being
spread by the hands, etc., before washing.

Quote:
>... but I still use the old stand-by, Calamine lotion. It stops the
>itch and also dries up the blisters quickly. ...

Calamine always offered some relief to me.  After noticing that swimming in a
pool relieved my symptoms and made it dry up quicker, I started treating my
poison ivy with straight Chlorox.  Fortunately, I seem to be much less allergic
to it than before.

Sam Midkiff



Sun, 22 Nov 1992 22:57:16 GMT
 Poison Ivy

Quote:
> by clothing also and then transferred to your skin. After the bumps
> break out on your skin, the most important thing to remember is
> DO NOT SCRATCH!. When you pop these blisters, the fluid spreads it
> further on your body, wherever the fluid is transferred. Its easy to
> get the fluid under your fingernails, then when you touch another part
> of your body,it will spread there. It is possible for your entire body
> to be covered, including your eyes and inside your mouth. BE CAREFUL!

        No, this is simply not correct. The only way to spread a poison
ivy rash is with the oil on the leaves (rhus oil). The watery discharge
of the rash has absolutely NOTHING to do with spreading the rash. You
can infect your rash by excessing scratching, especially with dirty
fingernails. If you get impetigo (a staph infection) in the rash then
you can spread that with your fingers. Otherwise, the only way to spread
it is by exposure to the oil. If you have the oil on your hands, you can
spread it to other parts of the body. The oil can be spread by burning,
by your dog who ran through the patch on the way home, from handling the
clothes you wore with the oil on them. But *not* from the rash itself.
That's a myth.

        Get TECNU for poison ivy exposure. You apply it after exposure
to neutralize the oil.
--

"Fling your beavers aloft!"



Sun, 22 Nov 1992 23:46:19 GMT
 Poison Ivy
phenol and no phenol formulas in terms of effects?  The same brand
name offered both formulas, but there was no hint on the label as
to why one would prefer one over the other.  Any experience with
the 2 types?

Path: neuro.usc.edu!logan


Mon, 23 Nov 1992 02:14:20 GMT
 Poison Ivy

    some correct informaton about how you get poison ivy ...

Ms. Patilla is correct - the only way to get poison ivy is to come into
contact with the oil from the plant.  The only thing I wanted to add is
that the oil is persistant.  If you get it on your clothes, pile them in
the corner, and then pick them up a few days later to throw them in the
wash, you can then get the rash on your arms.  The shoes you wore are
also covered with it.  And if you get some on your hands while you are
messing around with the stuff, every part of your body that you touch
before you wash may break out.  To get rid of the oil, you have to wash
very well with hot, soapy water (and I mean scrub).  I think the reason
so many people think it spreads by touching the blisters is that they
touch an affected area that still has some resin on it and then some
other place.  Whenever I have to handle the stuff (I'm pretty sensitive),
I wear long sleeves and long pants, etc.  Then I go directly to the
washing machine trying not to touch anything in the house, remove my
clothes and put them into the wahing machine and wash in hot water.  Then
I go and take a _hot_ shower and scrub hard.  I usually get a few small
patches here and there even with this method, but no major breakouts.
I scratch the patches I do get to my hearts content, but they never
spread.  Knowing this takes some of the agony out of having it.
sandy



Mon, 23 Nov 1992 01:22:32 GMT
 Poison Ivy

I see my article got completely garbled.  My question is, what is the
difference between phenol and no-phenol formulations of calomine lotion
in terms of their effects?  Both types were offered by the same brand
but the label gave not indication as to why one type would be preferred
over the other.  Any experience with the two?



Mon, 23 Nov 1992 02:36:19 GMT
 Poison Ivy

Quote:
Fowler) writes:
>Being born and raised in the South, I have had a lot of experiences with
>poison ivy and oak, though I am certainly not an expert. First, I do not
>think that you can get it if the vine is dead, and second, yes, it can  

I believe you can get it even if the vine has been dead for a long time.

There is supposedly a poison-ivy desensitization treatment that one can get
from one's doctor.  Does anyone know anything about that?
--
-------------
Jack Hamilton                                        



Mon, 23 Nov 1992 03:17:17 GMT
 Poison Ivy
Phenol acts as a local anesthetic, so its incorporation in poison ivy
nostrums may make some sense.  The same is true for the presence of
topical antihistamines (i.e., Benadryl in _Caladryl_ lotion).
Whatever efficacy they have is due to their local anesthetic
action, not an antihistaminic action.
--
Steve Dyer




Mon, 23 Nov 1992 03:54:25 GMT
 Poison Ivy

Quote:

>  I need some information about Poison Ivy..Bieing born and raised in ALASKA i
> am not very familiar with both snakes and poison ivy..I have not yet had any
> encounters with snakes but i am presently eat up with Poison Ivy.y...Question is..Does Poison Ivy spread? Can you contack a
> rash from Poison Ivy after the plant is dead and the vine is dry? And most of
> all what can i do to get rid of this terrible rash..I put Hydrocortizone on it
> and also Oxidol soap (the brown soap). Still seems to be spreading and its
> driving me up a wall..I tried taking a BENADRIL pill since it is supposed to be
> for allergies but in about 15 minutes it knocked me out.Any suggestion about
> any new miracle drug or old fashioned remedy for Poison Ivy??
>     DAN

Being born and raised in the South, I have had a lot of experiences with
poison ivy and oak, though I am certainly not an expert. First, I do not
think that you can get it if the vine is dead, and second, yes, it can  
"spread." Some people are much more sensitive to it than other; in fact
some people are immune to it. If you are extremely sensitive to it, it
is possible to get it just by barely brushing against it - the
substance on the leaf which makes you break out is invisible and can
be carried by the wind or a distrubance of the leaf, which might
explain how you got it on your back - it can be picked up and carried
by clothing also and then transferred to your skin. After the bumps
break out on your skin, the most important thing to remember is
DO NOT SCRATCH!. When you pop these blisters, the fluid spreads it
further on your body, wherever the fluid is transferred. Its easy to
get the fluid under your fingernails, then when you touch another part
of your body,it will spread there. It is possible for your entire body
to be covered, including your eyes and inside your mouth. BE CAREFUL!
I am sure there are many modern medicines on the market now for poison
ivy, but I still use the old stand-by, Calamine lotion. It stops the
itch and also dries up the blisters quickly. You can get this at any
drug store, and use it liberally. You will look like a pink person for
a while, but the results are good. Good luck!


Sun, 22 Nov 1992 21:26:57 GMT
 Poison Ivy

Lesions from poison ivy need not appear only at the site of contact
but can appear anywhere, even inside of the mouth.  THe toxin
gets into the {*filter*} and the blisters are an allergic reaction to
it.  You may need prednisone and should see your doctor.



Sun, 22 Nov 1992 21:17:50 GMT
 Poison Ivy
I stand corrected on my statements about poison ivy! I was just
going by what I had always believed to be correct, but obviously
most of the beliefs were myths. Sorry, and thanks for setting
me straight!

vicki



Tue, 24 Nov 1992 05:11:33 GMT
 Poison Ivy
A product called IVY-DRY always worked best for me.  Its active ingrediants
are tannic acid and alchohol.  Also, it is not obvious on the skin, unlike
calamine which looks like a horrible skin disease.

BTW, doesn't calamine contain mercury?  If so, it's not something I
would want to indulge in.



Wed, 25 Nov 1992 04:16:42 GMT
 Poison Ivy

Quote:
>BTW, doesn't calamine contain mercury?  If so, it's not something I
>would want to indulge in.

No, you're thinking of _calomel_, a chloride of mercury.
Calamine is simply zinc oxide with a small amount of
ferric oxide (i.e. rust) to give it that characteristic
pink color.

--
Steve Dyer




Fri, 27 Nov 1992 22:25:11 GMT
 
 [ 13 post ] 

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