meat-eating 
Author Message
 meat-eating

Quote:
> I am conducting (or trying to) a small discussion against the

> be grateful for any references to earlier fish/shellfish use than about
> 100,000 years ago - see following exchange:  "Sorry Richard, Regardless of
> how you propose to interpret the evidence (or lack thereof), the simple
> fact is that shell middens and other evidence for a subsistance economy
> based on substantial quantities of aquatic (marine or freshwater)
> resources has not been found in any site older than OIS 5 (< 130,000 years
> ago)."

Some thoughts:
1) Stones & bones conserve abnormally well: it's likely these activities are
over-represented in the fossil record, eg, as compared to plant food.
2) The human dentition is predom.omnivorous: no long canines, no carnassial
teeth, no plat, ridged palate etc.
3) It's to be expected that ex-litt{*filter*}people (where PUFAs are abundant)
badly needed the few PUFAs they had to find in bone marrow (although this is
very calorie-poor & difficult to obtain).
4) Do you call whales "meat"? M.Gutierrez cs.2001 "Exploitation d'un grand
ctac au Palolithique ancien: le site de Dungo V Baia Farta (Benguela,
Angola)" CRAS 332:357-362: a more than a mill.yrs-old almost complete
skeleton of a large whale Balaenoptera sp was found closely associated with
57 Lower Palaeolithic artefacts ...
5) Fish preserve very difficultly in the fossil record.
6) There's microwear evidence of consumption of dried fish by neandertals
already (implies well-developed processing of fish food).
7) Humans have an aversion of non-fresh meat (infection... risks?).  An
argument against scavenging?
8) Why would litt{*filter*}ancestors have brought the shellfish on land
(middens)?? In fact, the presence of shellfish middens (sapiens) suggests a
waterside, but predom.terrestrial life (which we know of course).
9) The butchering sites are always next to coasts/lakes/rivers. Collection
of drowned animals?
10) Neandertal tools bear traces of cattails. Plants can also be "aquatic":
the most important cooking.net">food of humans (rice) grows in water.
11) Regular fish-eating is probably recent=sapiens (except salmon etc.).
12) Drawnings of flatfish (seafish) are found high in the Pyrenees (late
Paleolithic IIRC). This suggest humans (& earlier Homo?) could follow the
rivers seasonally.
13) Human physiology is certainly not carnivorous, it's
omni-herbi-frugivorous. In fact, eating a lot of meat is not very healthy as
we know. Non-human primates (except insectivores) are not carnivorous,
humans are not carnivorous, there are no arguments the intermediate state
was.
14) The most meat-eating humans are Eskimos.
15) Etc.
Whatever, AFAICS there's no evidence against our ancestors having been
waterside for most of their past.

Marc Verhaegen

http://www.***.com/ ~mvaneech/Verhaegen.html

http://www.***.com/

http://www.***.com/

AAT = Homo litt{*filter*}diaspora

Truth is the intersection of independent lines --R.Levins 1966



Sat, 08 Dec 2007 16:43:53 GMT
 meat-eating
        How about white sand? We have two types of sand (AFAIK). Yellow sand
is from normal source. But white sand is a remain of shells of aquatic
animals (AFAIK). Shells of aquatic animals turn into sand, after some time.
Is that time 130000 years? Also, I wonder how long before metal turns into
dust. -- Mario


Sat, 08 Dec 2007 18:56:15 GMT
 meat-eating

Quote:
>        How about white sand? We have two types of sand (AFAIK). Yellow
> sand
> is from normal source. But white sand is a remain of shells of aquatic
> animals (AFAIK). Shells of aquatic animals turn into sand, after some
> time. Is that time 130000 years? Also, I wonder how long before metal
> turns into dust. -- Mario

<plonk>


Sat, 08 Dec 2007 19:11:11 GMT
 
 [ 3 post ] 

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