The Isle of May may be Arthur's Avalon according to a Scots historian 
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 The Isle of May may be Arthur's Avalon according to a Scots historian

Man or myth

The Isle of May may be Avalon according to a Scots historian - who also claims Arthur was a Scots warrior. Kath Gourlay reports

From the land, youd miss it if you werent looking for it - a tiny splodge of green dropped into the water where the Firth of Forth enters the North Sea. Youd need a pretty compelling reason for visiting. Its an eight-mile journey from Anstruther, and when you get there, the heavy swell surging into the bit that isnt sheer cliff means that you have a 50-50 chance of actually landing on the Isle of May.

If the Isle of May is Avalon, as Scots historian Stuart McHardy has just claimed, then Morgan le Fay and............
http://www.***.com/



Fri, 30 Apr 2004 03:36:54 GMT
 The Isle of May may be Arthur's Avalon according to a Scots historian

Jenn

This is a curious view. The people of Scotland at the time of Arthur (roughly 500 AD) were Picts. It was only after the expulsion of St. Columba from Ireland that the Scots got to Scotland. Where is he Isle of May? Perhaps there has been an error and The Isle of Man is meant. There are several characters in the legend of Arthur that are historical and they are located in England.

It is in our errors that we recognize the value of truth. Indeed! if one has to choose between error and ignorance, ignorance is to be preferered. Recognized ignorance has the potential for change. Commitment in error is entrenched ignorance. The truth is the only value. There is no other

Angelo Tulumello

  Man or myth

  The Isle of May may be Avalon according to a Scots historian - who also claims Arthur was a Scots warrior. Kath Gourlay reports

  From the land, youd miss it if you werent looking for it - a tiny splodge of green dropped into the water where the Firth of Forth enters the North Sea. Youd need a pretty compelling reason for visiting. Its an eight-mile journey from Anstruther, and when you get there, the heavy swell surging into the bit that isnt sheer cliff means that you have a 50-50 chance of actually landing on the Isle of May.

  If the Isle of May is Avalon, as Scots historian Stuart McHardy has just claimed, then Morgan le Fay and............
  http://www.thescotsman.co.uk/index.cfm?id=121996&keyword=the



Fri, 30 Apr 2004 19:37:31 GMT
 The Isle of May may be Arthur's Avalon according to a Scots historian

Whilst the view of Arthurian Britain expressed here does seem to feature a lot of Scots nationalism combined with ethereal foolishness, it is fair to say that southern Scotland and far northern England were 'Welsh' around 500 AD, and that the last part of it to remain independently Welsh was the Kingdom of Strathclyde (Glasgow and environs) which was absorbed into the Kingdom of the Scots in the 10th century. Edinburgh was the seat of the Kingdom of Gododdin, which fell to the Angles after a disastrous campaign against the Northumbrian Angles in, er, 558 (I think -  my books are elsewhere), memorialised in the great Welsh poem 'the Gododdin'. The line between Picts and Northern Welsh was probably along the Forth, close to the places mentioned here. Current authorities on the Picts prefer to see them as Celtic-mixed-with-earlier- inhabitants rather than {*filter*} survivals of strange and magical origins, and they probably had a great deal in common with both the Welsh to their south and the incoming Scots to their west, with whom they united later in a process that seems to have involved both intermarriage and conflict. No wizards or druids seem to have been involved in this process --

  Jenn

  This is a curious view. The people of Scotland at the time of Arthur (roughly 500 AD) were Picts. It was only after the expulsion of St. Columba from Ireland that the Scots got to Scotland. Where is he Isle of May? Perhaps there has been an error and The Isle of Man is meant. There are several characters in the legend of Arthur that are historical and they are located in England.

  It is in our errors that we recognize the value of truth. Indeed! if one has to choose between error and ignorance, ignorance is to be preferered. Recognized ignorance has the potential for change. Commitment in error is entrenched ignorance. The truth is the only value. There is no other

  Angelo Tulumello

    Man or myth

    The Isle of May may be Avalon according to a Scots historian - who also claims Arthur was a Scots warrior. Kath Gourlay reports

    From the land, youd miss it if you werent looking for it - a tiny splodge of green dropped into the water where the Firth of Forth enters the North Sea. Youd need a pretty compelling reason for visiting. Its an eight-mile journey from Anstruther, and when you get there, the heavy swell surging into the bit that isnt sheer cliff means that you have a 50-50 chance of actually landing on the Isle of May.

    If the Isle of May is Avalon, as Scots historian Stuart McHardy has just claimed, then Morgan le Fay and............
    http://www.***.com/



Sat, 01 May 2004 02:27:29 GMT
 
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