Blood types (Celtic/Norman/etc) 
Author Message
 Blood types (Celtic/Norman/etc)

[ Article crossposted from soc.culture.irish,soc.culture.celtic ]
[ Author was Donal O'Sullivan ]
[ Posted on 4 Aug 1997 07:56:44 GMT ]


: Hi,
:
: This is not a Kook question. I am looking for the latest
: scientific evidence on this.
:
: Has anyone any references on efforts to track
: population through hair colour, {*filter*} type
: and other genetic features.
:

I saw a BBC programme about a year ago where a chiropodist was able to
demonstrate a correlation between the bone structure of feet and Celtic
race. Her population study was England and sure enough it confirmed my own
presupposition that the English are about 50%+ Celtic in origin. However,
she seemed to know what she was talking about - not from books but from
her own experience.

Donal

--



Fri, 21 Jan 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Blood types (Celtic/Norman/etc)

[ Article crossposted from soc.culture.irish,soc.culture.celtic ]
[ Author was Gareth G Davis ]
[ Posted on 3 Aug 1997 05:21:30 GMT ]

Hi,

This is not a Kook question. I am looking for the latest
scientific evidence on this.

Has anyone any references on efforts to track
population through hair colour, {*filter*} type
and other genetic features.

I'm sure that there was a lot of bad work done
in the 1800s on "breeds" of people. But I have
heard vocally that the British isles still contains
a large degree of regional differences which reflect
different populations. I once saw a map which posited three
groups:

1) Celtic {*filter*} type (forget which)

2) Anglo-Saxon-Frankish (broader than this name but
basically those who moved onto the isles from the
continent from 500AD onwards)

3) Aborginal (pre-celts). I am told that this group
is most numerous in Wales and parts of Scotland and
Ireland but Wales particularily. The {*filter*} group
associated with these people is O positive and thats
what I am. I am also told that this group is genetically
prone to {*filter*}ism and all sorts of health problems.(This
could be bullshit).

I would love to see any evidence which refutes or confirms
this.

Can anyone help.

Gareth

--

--



Fri, 21 Jan 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Blood types (Celtic/Norman/etc)

[ Article crossposted from soc.culture.irish,soc.culture.celtic ]
[ Author was Briain ]
[ Posted on Sun, 3 Aug 1997 19:06:06 +0100 ]



Quote:
>Hi,

>This is not a Kook question. I am looking for the latest
>scientific evidence on this.

>Has anyone any references on efforts to track
>population through hair colour, {*filter*} type
>and other genetic features.

>I'm sure that there was a lot of bad work done
>in the 1800s on "breeds" of people. But I have
>heard vocally that the British isles still contains
>a large degree of regional differences which reflect
>different populations. I once saw a map which posited three
>groups:
>Gareth

I heard a discussion on BBC Radio 4 last week which included
contributions from an Irish geneticist about several years, work
recently completed in Ireland (can't remember the guy's name). He stated
categorically that the present Irish population yieded NO TRACE of
Celtic origins (seriously). There is apparently a massive amount of
evidence of  Viking genetic origins  around, though.
--
Brian

Some people have a way with words - some, no have way.....Steve Martin

New Irish poetry from the Black North at

http://www.***.com/ ~briain

--



Fri, 21 Jan 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Blood types (Celtic/Norman/etc)

[ Article crossposted from soc.culture.irish ]
[ Author was CANDOCOP ]
[ Posted on 4 Aug 1997 11:29:23 GMT ]


Quote:
Davis) writes:

>Hi,

>This is not a Kook question. I am looking for the latest
>scientific evidence on this.

>Has anyone any references on efforts to track
>population through hair colour, {*filter*} type
>and other genetic features.

>I'm sure that there was a lot of bad work done
>in the 1800s on "breeds" of people. But I have
>heard vocally that the British isles still contains
>a large degree of regional differences which reflect
>different populations. I once saw a map which posited three
>groups:

>1) Celtic {*filter*} type (forget which)

>2) Anglo-Saxon-Frankish (broader than this name but
>basically those who moved onto the isles from the
>continent from 500AD onwards)

>3) Aborginal (pre-celts). I am told that this group
>is most numerous in Wales and parts of Scotland and
>Ireland but Wales particularily. The {*filter*} group
>associated with these people is O positive and thats
>what I am. I am also told that this group is genetically
>prone to {*filter*}ism and all sorts of health problems.(This
>could be bullshit).

>I would love to see any evidence which refutes or confirms
>this.

>Can anyone help.

>Gareth

Sounds like someone got a government grant to study something and avoid
getting a job. The UK has all the {*filter*} types same as every where else and
in the same ratios. Good question though.
Dave M.

--



Fri, 21 Jan 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Blood types (Celtic/Norman/etc)

[ Article crossposted from soc.culture.irish ]
[ Author was Smgallag ]
[ Posted on 4 Aug 1997 02:45:47 GMT ]


Quote:

>He stated categorically that the present Irish population yieded NO TRACE
of
>Celtic origins (seriously). There is apparently a massive amount of
>evidence of  Viking genetic origins  around, though.

So, what constitutes Celtic origins, according to this person's studies?
Are we talking Pict, which is small & dark in its origin, or what?  Your
response is vague, leaving much to speculate.
--Gallagher

--



Fri, 21 Jan 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Blood types (Celtic/Norman/etc)

[ Article crossposted from soc.culture.irish,soc.culture.celtic ]
[ Author was Paul Linehan ]
[ Posted on Mon, 04 Aug 1997 12:10:40 GMT ]


Quote:
> Hi,
> This is not a Kook question. I am looking for the latest
> scientific evidence on this.
> Has anyone any references on efforts to track
> population through hair colour, {*filter*} type
> and other genetic features.

I've forgotten lots of stuff about this, but you could try a book on
{*filter*} types by a chap called Mourant called something like "{*filter*}
types" originally enough.

Quote:
> I'm sure that there was a lot of bad work done
> in the 1800s on "breeds" of people. But I have
> heard vocally that the British isles still contains
> a large degree of regional differences which reflect
> different populations. I once saw a map which posited three
> groups:
> 1) Celtic {*filter*} type (forget which)

"O"

Quote:
> 2) Anglo-Saxon-Frankish (broader than this name but
> basically those who moved onto the isles from the
> continent from 500AD onwards)

prob. "A"

Quote:
> 3) Aborginal (pre-celts). I am told that this group
> is most numerous in Wales and parts of Scotland and
> Ireland but Wales particularily. The {*filter*} group
> associated with these people is O positive and thats
> what I am. I am also told that this group is genetically
> prone to {*filter*}ism and all sorts of health problems.(This
> could be bullshit).

"O" is associated with the Celts in general. I don't recall ever
having seen anything about the Tuatha de Danaan or the Beakers or
anything like that.

It does appear that the Celts do have a susceptibility for {*filter*},
but then most ethnic groups have various genetic "defects" associated
with them.

In fact, for example, it is just possible that the "defect"
responsible for increased susceptibility to {*filter*} actually
originated to help in the production of heat in cold climates - or
something - i.e. the phenomenon that we see may have nothing to do
with any possible function.

Quote:
> I would love to see any evidence which refutes or confirms
> this.

Search through Medline and stuff like that. Lots has been written
about it.

However, the {*filter*} types are not good determinants of "ethnicity" -
your own "O" {*filter*} type is an example. You might be interested to
learn that my own is "A" - so I'm a Hun!

Quote:
> Can anyone help.

Hope this is a start.

Paul...

Quote:
> Gareth
> --

--


Fri, 21 Jan 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Blood types (Celtic/Norman/etc)

[ Article crossposted from soc.culture.irish,soc.culture.celtic ]
[ Author was Neil Alasdair McEwan ]
[ Posted on 4 Aug 1997 14:00:31 GMT ]


: Hi,

: This is not a Kook question. I am looking for the latest
: scientific evidence on this.

: Has anyone any references on efforts to track
: population through hair colour, {*filter*} type
: and other genetic features.

     Interestingly, there was somebody on soc.culture.scottish some months
back claiming that Celtic people had bigger feet than the Anglo-Saxons.

slainte

Neil
--

--



Fri, 21 Jan 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Blood types (Celtic/Norman/etc)

[ Article crossposted from soc.culture.irish,soc.culture.celtic ]
[ Author was Paul Linehan ]
[ Posted on Mon, 04 Aug 1997 12:10:40 GMT ]


Quote:
> Hi,
> This is not a Kook question. I am looking for the latest
> scientific evidence on this.
> Has anyone any references on efforts to track
> population through hair colour, {*filter*} type
> and other genetic features.

I've forgotten lots of stuff about this, but you could try a book on
{*filter*} types by a chap called Mourant called something like "{*filter*}
types" originally enough.

Quote:
> I'm sure that there was a lot of bad work done
> in the 1800s on "breeds" of people. But I have
> heard vocally that the British isles still contains
> a large degree of regional differences which reflect
> different populations. I once saw a map which posited three
> groups:
> 1) Celtic {*filter*} type (forget which)

"O"

Quote:
> 2) Anglo-Saxon-Frankish (broader than this name but
> basically those who moved onto the isles from the
> continent from 500AD onwards)

prob. "A"

Quote:
> 3) Aborginal (pre-celts). I am told that this group
> is most numerous in Wales and parts of Scotland and
> Ireland but Wales particularily. The {*filter*} group
> associated with these people is O positive and thats
> what I am. I am also told that this group is genetically
> prone to {*filter*}ism and all sorts of health problems.(This
> could be bullshit).

"O" is associated with the Celts in general. I don't recall ever
having seen anything about the Tuatha de Danaan or the Beakers or
anything like that.

It does appear that the Celts do have a susceptibility for {*filter*},
but then most ethnic groups have various genetic "defects" associated
with them.

In fact, for example, it is just possible that the "defect"
responsible for increased susceptibility to {*filter*} actually
originated to help in the production of heat in cold climates - or
something - i.e. the phenomenon that we see may have nothing to do
with any possible function.

Quote:
> I would love to see any evidence which refutes or confirms
> this.

Search through Medline and stuff like that. Lots has been written
about it.

However, the {*filter*} types are not good determinants of "ethnicity" -
your own "O" {*filter*} type is an example. You might be interested to
learn that my own is "A" - so I'm a Hun!

Quote:
> Can anyone help.

Hope this is a start.

Paul...

Quote:
> Gareth
> --

--


Fri, 21 Jan 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Blood types (Celtic/Norman/etc)


Quote:

> > > I'm sure that there was a lot of bad work done
> > > in the 1800s on "breeds" of people. But I have
> > > heard vocally that the British isles still contains
> > > a large degree of regional differences which reflect
> > > different populations. I once saw a map which posited three
> > > groups:

> > > 1) Celtic {*filter*} type (forget which)

> > "O"

> Almost certainly "B" or "AB", which is the classic case of a localised
> {*filter*} group in Great Britain.  These groups are remanants of the Celtic
> or "British" population that was pushed back into Wales after the
> Anglo-Saxon invasion.  The {*filter*} group perists in high proportions in
> parts of rural Wales yet is rare outside these areas.  

I am also interested in {*filter*} type distributions due to an interest in
genealogy.  I read somewhere that there is a small population in Scotland
who are Rh-; the article went on to state that the Rh- was due to the fact
that Spanish sailors who shipwrecked on their shores later intermarried and
introduced the negative Rh factor.  

Will some kind person direct me to any publications which might discuss
{*filter*} type distributions - worldwide - in depth?   Please post a reply to
the newsgroup.  Thanks to all.



Thu, 27 Jan 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Blood types (Celtic/Norman/etc)

Quote:

> I am also interested in {*filter*} type distributions
> due to an interest in
> genealogy.  I read somewhere that there is a
> small population in Scotland
> who are Rh-; the article went on to state that
> the Rh- was due to the fact
> that Spanish sailors who shipwrecked on their
> shores later intermarried and
> introduced the negative Rh factor.

> Will some kind person direct me to any
> publications which might discuss
> {*filter*} type distributions - worldwide - in
> depth?   Please post a reply to
> the newsgroup.  Thanks to all.

Try "The History & Geography of Human Genes,"  by
L. L.Cavalli-Sforza (Prof. of Genetics, Stanford
Univ.), P. Menozzi (Prof. of Ecology, Univ.. of
Parma), & A. Piazza (Prof. of Human Genetics,
Medical School of Turin).  It was published in
1994 by Princeton University Press.  It's about as
comprehensive on this subject as you could
possibly want.  Maps galore, too - worldwide.

respectfully submitted,


:::My employer is not responsible for my opinions,
not matter how sensible they are.:::



Fri, 28 Jan 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 Blood types (Celtic/Norman/etc)

I don't recall the publication, but the Max Plank Institute in Germany
has a lot of information on this topic.

Here is one:
Prokop, O. and Uhlenbruek, G.  Human {*filter*} and Serum Groups,
Maclaren and Sons, London, 1969.



Mon, 31 Jan 2000 03:00:00 GMT
 
 [ 11 post ] 

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